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Poll
How do you attach your riser to your pot
Alumina/Glue 18% [9/49]
EPK/Glue 51% [25/49]
EPK/Alumina/Glue 18% [9/49]
Biscuit Mix 4% [2/49]
Other - Explain 8% [4/49]

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glennwoods
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Posts: 464
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted December 13th, 2009 03:53 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Holly and Phil,

I also used Alumina HYDRATE and found the results to be less than what I get with the EPK mixture. And Koz, I did grind and polish the surface of the footring and top of pedistal with a diamond wheel before I put them together. They were CLEAN and TIGHT but held on for dear life when I tried to separate them. What am I doing wrong? I am willing to give it another try now that I am past my Christmas rush. Guide me gently onto the path of success . . . ok, I crossed the line but I DO need help.

Glenn Woods
4 am and dreaming about crysalline pots
   
Koz
Clay Wizard/Court Jester

Posts: 1961
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted December 15th, 2009 04:06 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Glenn,
Well shucky darn.

In bone dry greenware I sand the foot ring and the pedestal, then scuff them against each other in a circular motion.
This mates the two pieces perfectly and give a flat to flat fit, then the diameter of either can be tuned in a bit if needed.

After the bisk firing, they usually fit perfectly, but if not I repeat the process before glueing the two together.

I am still convinced that the issue here is MOSTLY the fit of the two pieces.

If you continue to have trouble, I have to admit it could very well be your clay body, so in that case just go back to EPK.

I wish I could help you more.

What clay are you using?
Send me some and I will try it myself, if that helps you sleep at night.
Then we will both know we are not crazy, and it only seems to work for me.

Let me know.

Koz

P.S.
You're sure you didn't accidentally use 3110 instead of alumina hydrate, right?

Testify, Good People, Testify...
www.wizardofclay.com
   
glennwoods
Official Greeter

Posts: 464
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted December 15th, 2009 09:42 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Koz,

I thought Alumina Hydrate was another name for 3110 . . . I'll check my unmarked paper bags of white powder and see which one tastes most like alumina (just kidding)

I am convinced that I just put too much glue in the mixture and not enough Alumina Hydrate - If I hadn't seen how easily your pots popped off, I would just throw in the towel - I have to admit I did snap back to the EPK/glue mixture but I intend to give the Alumina Hydrate another try.

I am using a cone 6 white stoneware (Little Loafers from Highwater Clay) and fire it to 11-12. You might think that would be the problem but I also had tested the cone 10 white stoneware (Loafers Glory), their P-10 porcelain, as well as their Helios Porcelain which are all cone 10 bodies. The bodies designed for cone 10 did the same thing. We are in the process of using a stoneware for the riser/pedistal which has a slightly different shrinkage rate to see if that will enhance the ability to release.

Thanks for your help - I will keep trying on this end. Just did a kiln opening this weekend and I used the EPK/glue mixture and it seemed to be a little more difficult but each one popped off with a little more heat.

Thanks again
Glenn Woods
   
John Tilton
Artist-In-Residence

Posts: 364
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted December 15th, 2009 10:15 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Hey Glenn,

It seems to me that each clay body is going to be a little different and that there may not be an ultimate separation solution for all clay bodies. But perhaps there is.

I just glazed some manganese crystal pots and that glaze is really hard when it cools -- you can put the torch on it for a long time and it will not crack -- so after the pots came out I scored them with the diamond cut off wheel about an eighth of an inch below the seam and then used the torch. It worked.

I used a combination of EPK and Alumina and it seemed to work pretty well. No glaze was in the seam but the EPK is still hard to remove.

My idea for going forward is to consider that Alumina Hydrate is the main separation material and so Alumina and Glue will be the base. If glaze runs in I will then add something with high refractoriness and low particle size like EPK or Bentonite or V- Gum T. I have some pyrophyllite and it seems to have very small particle size too and it is refractory.

My idea for taking pots off the pedestals is to heat the pedestal and then wait until the pot just lifts off without any banging. My solution will have to do that. I find that when I lift the pot, pedestal, and catcher and bang them down, the chances for small chips goes up by 32%. That's almost 1/3.

John


   
Stephen Boehme
Artist-In-Residence

Posts: 248
Registered: Dec 2008
 Posted December 16th, 2009 09:16 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
I just had a thought this morning. The EPK is not sticking to the porcelain but the porcelain is sticking to the EPK. I have allways added a little alumina hydrate to the wax resist I use on the bottoms of my porcelain pots. What about a thin watery layer of alunina and glue than a thicker layer of Epk. The alumina would prevent the porcelain sintering to the EPK. One more step but crystalline glazers are little fussy anyway.

Have a lovely morning
steve

http://www.boehmestudioproductions.com/
   
glennwoods
Official Greeter

Posts: 464
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted December 21st, 2009 05:36 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
While I am not giving up on the alumina hydrate/elmers glue mixture. One of the things we will be trying next at the Dunedin Fine Art Center is a theory we have been discussing for a while. Wilson Page is going to throw all of his risers/pedistals out of a stoneware body that has a different shrinkage rate - the theory is that the two bodies having different shrinkage rates will produce enough tension at the point where the two pieces are joined by the Alumina Hydrate/Elmers Glue mixture that they will easily pop apart when the thermal shock produced by the tourch increases the tension in a more dramatic way. We will let you know how that goes.
Happy Holidays
Glenn Woods
   
Avi Harriman
Administrator

Posts: 1198
Registered: Dec 2008
 Posted December 21st, 2009 06:16 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
OK, well, uh, hmm, garg, hack, hack how do I say this?@#$%&*#!.

I guess I just better spit it out..... SarahLyn and I tried the wood glue/alumina hydrate mixture and I have to say that well, uh, hmm, garg, hack, hack ?@#$%&*#!

It worked (that was hard to say). They did break away clean with no residue. It is possible that when I had problems in the past I was using a different clay than I am now. I now use Colman porcelain.

I intend to try it again on the next firing.


(Edited by Avi Harriman)

Be well, do good work, and keep in touch
   
glennwoods
Official Greeter

Posts: 464
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted December 21st, 2009 11:13 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Can't afford Coleman porcelain - it is interesting to me that the EPK worked just fine with the claybody I am using but didn't dust off like the alumina hydrate. It will be worth finding a solution that works with the clay that I use AND have the release agent just dust off. un, hmm,garg,hack, hack . . . show off!
With friendly regard
Glenn Woods
   
Neil Simak
Journeyman Crystallier

Posts: 110
Registered: Jun 2009
 Posted December 22nd, 2009 12:03 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
I have been using the Alumina Hydrate/glue ever since this topic was brought up and it has dusted off and has a cleaner break than the EPK. I also switched to b-mix because it was cheaper that the Helios. With the Helios the Alumina dusted off but I noticed that it liked to chip the edge a little more? so I've converted to the Alumina (with the b-mix).

best wishes to all and happy festivus
Neil
   
Bill
Glaze Guru

Posts: 569
Registered: Dec 2008
 Posted December 22nd, 2009 09:16 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Quote:
John Tilton wrote:
Hey Glenn,

I just glazed some manganese crystal pots and that glaze is really hard when it cools -- you can put the torch on it for a long time and it will not crack -- so after the pots came out I scored them with the diamond cut off wheel about an eighth of an inch below the seam and then used the torch. It worked.

I used a combination of EPK and Alumina and it seemed to work pretty well. No glaze was in the seam but the EPK is still hard to remove.

My idea for going forward is to consider that Alumina Hydrate is the main separation material and so Alumina and Glue will be the base. If glaze runs in I will then add something with high refractoriness and low particle size like EPK or Bentonite or V- Gum T. I have some pyrophyllite and it seems to have very small particle size too and it is refractory.

My idea for taking pots off the pedestals is to heat the pedestal and then wait until the pot just lifts off without any banging. My solution will have to do that. I find that when I lift the pot, pedestal, and catcher and bang them down, the chances for small chips goes up by 32%. That's almost 1/3.

John


Back in the dark ages, I used IFB coated with kiln wash as the pedestal, always keeping my fingers crossed that the glaze wouldn't eat through the brick and cause the pot to fall over - it happened more than once.
Then David Snair's article in CM showed the method of clay pedestals using an alumina/kaolin mix. But we were still whacking the pedestals off with chisels.
Years later, having gathered a number of pots with chipped feet that I learned about making the "biscuit mix" pedestal. I continue to use this method. It does leave more **** stuck to the bottom of the pot, but it's all so soft it comes off easily at the bench grinder. Never had a chipped foot since.
It wasn't until I saw Peter Ilsley at Lattice Structures demo his torch method that I considered going back to the clay pedestal method.
I have shown my students both ways and they seem to all migrate to the biscuit method.

Here are some thoughts about separating agents:
EPK is used because of it's structure - as a clay it has flat plate-like shapes, which should aid in sealing the seam between pot & pedestal. Why then is it hard to completely remove - because it's clay, alumina & silica - it's the silica in the clay that fuses to the clay that makes up the pot.
Alumina is very refractory, but it's structure is more grain/rounded, so it will be more "open" than EPK. It will act more as a separator, unless some glaze gets between pot & pedestal.
So it would seem a mix of both might be the best compromise.
As Koz has pointed out, a good flat surface between pot & pedestal are critical. There can be no curve on the edge of the pot's foot or at the top of the pedestal that would invite the glaze the follow the surface into the seam.
I wonder if having the diameter of the pot ever so slightly larger than the pedestal might serve to keep glaze from the seam. Would the glaze flow straight down or follow the surface under the pot into the seam? What if the foot were angled up slightly from the outside edge towards the center?
How about the alumina? Has anybody tried grinding the alumina finer in a mortar and pestle?
Using the torch to separate pot/pedestal - has anybody tried using a glass cutter to score the seam, then used the torch? It would seem creating a fracture line might help in a clean separation.
I do plan on running some tests using different separation materials.
Just some things to consider.

Bill

Bill Schran
wschran at cox dot net

   
Koz
Clay Wizard/Court Jester

Posts: 1961
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted December 22nd, 2009 10:34 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Word Good People,

Couple of thoughts then I'm off to mix up some alumina hydrate and glue.

Make sure what you are using IS ACTUALLY ALUMINA HYDRATE.
If it sticks to anything at all, it isn't alumina hydrate.
Not just alumina, ALUMINA HYDRATE.

It is the finest powder I have ever incountered besides food grade amorphous silica.

It is exactly the same stuff after it is fired. Fluffy and fine and light, like an armfull of Utah powder.
If you could collect it you could re-use it.

Bill,
You mentioned a mortar and pestle treatment to get alumina finer.
If it's alumina HYDRATE, I don't think it gets finer.

I think there might be some confusion out there, possibly starting with suppliers, and it also might be a communications problem.

Make sure you are using the RIGHT STUFF everyone!

I have tried it on many many clay bodies and it ALWAYS works for me.

I'm so confident I can make work on any clay body, I'm willing to offer an opportunity to anyone who wants to take it.

If you are having trouble with your clay body and alumina hydrate, send me 10 pounds of your clay. Tell me what the clay body is, and it has to be ^10 clay.

I'll make a few things, use the alumina hydrate, then send you a piece back.

No guarantees on the exact timing (within a couple of months) or the results (could be **** crystals, but on a really nice shaped pot).

You pay the shipping both ways.

What a deal.
I get to test more clay bodies, and you get a little gem from Koz.

Koz

P.S.
I reserve the right to cancel this offer at any time, so if you are serious about it, get the stuff on a truck and get it too me pronto.
I'm a busy boy.



Testify, Good People, Testify...
www.wizardofclay.com
   
Adam MacMillan
Journeyman Crystallier

Posts: 106
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted December 22nd, 2009 12:46 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
In response to Bill's comment about making the diameter of the foot of the pot slightly larger than the pedistal...

I've tried this, what happens is the clay still flows around the foot and onto the ring, but now the glaze covering the joint is about 3+times thicker than normal. This make the pedistals even harder to get off, and then leaves you with more glaze that needs to be ground off the foot.

Adam

Adam MacMillan
   
Avi Harriman
Administrator

Posts: 1198
Registered: Dec 2008
 Posted December 22nd, 2009 01:40 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Quote:
Adam MacMillan wrote:
In response to Bill's comment about making the diameter of the foot of the pot slightly larger than the pedestal...

I've tried this, what happens is the clay still flows around the foot and onto the ring, but now the glaze covering the joint is about 3+times thicker than normal. This make the pedestals even harder to get off, and then leaves you with more glaze that needs to be ground off the foot.
Adam


Yep to what Adam said. If it can't be exact a little smaller is much better.


Be well, do good work, and keep in touch
   
Anne Rutter
Know-It-All

Posts: 27
Registered: Oct 2009
 Posted December 23rd, 2009 04:44 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Bill
You wondered if anyone used a glass cutter.I use alumina hydrate no glue.After firing I score the seam with a glass cutter and tap downwards with a hammer until they separate.If the separation is not clean then I know I didn't smooth the two sufaces well enough.
Anne
   
Koz
Clay Wizard/Court Jester

Posts: 1961
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted December 24th, 2009 10:30 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Anne,
No glue?

What do you do?

How do you glaze things?

How do you keep glaze off the foot of the pot?

Do you carefully balance the pot on the pedestal and set it in the kiln?

Put the pedestals in the kiln then put the alumina hydrate on the rim then the pot on that?

What if you need to move things around in the kiln?

I can only imagine how tedious that must be, and the time spent doing so I'm sure would completely eclipse the time spent mixing up a bit of glue.

Why don't you just glue the two together to have one movable piece?

Have you TRIED a torch?

Are you maybe only firing a few pieces at a time?

Huh?

Koz



Testify, Good People, Testify...
www.wizardofclay.com
   
Anne Rutter
Know-It-All

Posts: 27
Registered: Oct 2009
 Posted December 25th, 2009 07:06 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Koz Hi
I know about torches NOW but 25years ago when I started with this crystal thing there was no one to ask --had to reinvent the wheel.
The last 10 years up to 2004 when I had to stop potting I used an 18 cubic feet
gas kiln .
2009 I bought a small electric kiln and have started the testing again.Ialso plan to buy a torch!
P.SDon't seem to have a prob moving things around in the kiln. Anne
   
Koz
Clay Wizard/Court Jester

Posts: 1961
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted December 28th, 2009 12:15 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Good day all,

Well..........Neil took me up on my offer.
I came to work yesterday and found a Fed-Ex box on my wheel with 10 pounds of B-mix 10 in it.

I know B-mix 10 works with the alumina hydrate and glue, but Neil's B-mix is a noticeably different color than what I have.
That is a bit confusing to me, because Neil lives in Ohio, and I can only assume HIS B-mix came from the Laguna plant in Byesville Ohio, not from the West coast.

Hmmmm..........I thought to myself, I'll give it a try.

If this stuff works like it did for me back in the good ol' days, I'm going to have to give Laguna Ohio a call and see if they have some explanation for it.

Have they taken the complaints of potters seriously and decided to make all B-Mix the same?

I'll do a side by side test with Neil's B-Mix and what I have, and well just see now, won't we?

So thanks, Neil.
I gotta hand it to ya.
For a guy just starting out, you really are gunning after it.
It's the only way to get results, and like I have said before, just go for it, get some stuff good and hot and see what happens.

Give me a few weeks, and I'll have some answers and you will have a piece waiting for you on your doorstep.

I got your message, I'll get back to you when it's done.

The offer still stands, if anyone else is interested.
B-mix 10 is covered, so if you have some other clay you can't make work with alumina hydrate and glue, I'll try it out, then send you a little gem.

Time to make the donuts.

Koz

Testify, Good People, Testify...
www.wizardofclay.com
   
Phil Hamling
Everyone's Uncle

Posts: 931
Registered: Dec 2008
 Posted January 17th, 2010 09:59 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Dear Mr. Wizard,

Alumina Hydrate beat EPK hands down in my book. I want to switch my vote!

I started with the wrong material (only 20% chemical water content) and although the glaze didn't infiltrate it, it fused hard as a rock. The right material has closer to 35% chemical water. I put together this note page to help me keep it straight. Alumina Hydrate Notes

Now that I have the right stuff (Thanks a million for sending some Jeff) I see just how magical this material is.



I've used it on my last dozen or so pieces and the cleanup is amazing. Pop the catcher and clean off the dust with a sponge.

I could never figure out how somone would be happy using a bench grinder at the end to clean up the edges but now I see that all you need to do is bevel the edge where the glaze cracked and sponge off the bottom.

Phil

I want to grow up to be just like the best!

http://puttgarden.com/crystal/2007/Page.html
   
Koz
Clay Wizard/Court Jester

Posts: 1961
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted January 17th, 2010 10:04 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Uncle Phil,

Glory days, glory days!

Heck, even Avi switched!

Have you ever noticed that Avi Harriman and Alumina Hydrate have the same initials?

I wonder what Alumina Hydrate's middle name is?

Koz

Testify, Good People, Testify...
www.wizardofclay.com
   
Avi Harriman
Administrator

Posts: 1198
Registered: Dec 2008
 Posted January 17th, 2010 12:13 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Quote:
Koz wrote:
Uncle Phil,
I wonder what Alumina Hydrate's middle name is?
Koz


Ralph


Be well, do good work, and keep in touch
   
Neil Simak
Journeyman Crystallier

Posts: 110
Registered: Jun 2009
 Posted January 22nd, 2010 12:57 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Koz-

About the b-mix I sent you, I went and picked up 5 more boxes. It was odd, everything seemed to be the same until I got to the second box. The clay I sent and was using had more of a tan to yellow color to it, but now this stuff is more of a light grey/very very light tan color. I wish I had some of the original b-mix left to compare photos but you can see a major difference.

Anyway, I used some of the second box on Wednesday to make pedestals that are being bisqued at the moment and we'll see how everything works out.

Neil
   
Jeff Gieringer
Artist-In-Residence

Posts: 374
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted January 22nd, 2010 07:21 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Quote:
Phil Hamling wrote:
Dear Mr. Wizard,

Alumina Hydrate beat EPK hands down in my book. I want to switch my vote!

I started with the wrong material (only 20% chemical water content) and although the glaze didn't infiltrate it, it fused hard as a rock. The right material has closer to 35% chemical water. I put together this note page to help me keep it straight. Alumina Hydrate Notes

Now that I have the right stuff (Thanks a million for sending some Jeff) I see just how magical this material is.

I've used it on my last dozen or so pieces and the cleanup is amazing. Pop the catcher and clean off the dust with a sponge.

I could never figure out how somone would be happy using a bench grinder at the end to clean up the edges but now I see that all you need to do is bevel the edge where the glaze cracked and sponge off the bottom.

Phil


Phil,

Ain't it GREAT?!

Jeff

"If you are lucky enough to find a way of life that you love, you have to find the courage to live it." John Irving.


www.powdermillpottery.com
www.powdermillpottery.blogspot.com

   
bill powell
Journeyman Crystallier

Posts: 110
Registered: Mar 2011
 Posted March 14th, 2011 04:22 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
This is an old thread and maybe an old issue but I'll put my two bobs worth in anyway. I throw 15 mm tall rings to the size of the footring . I then use PVA glue with Alumina Hydrate to glue them together . When they can be pickup without the ring falling of [ about 10>15 minutes ] I then trail or brush slip around the join to form a gasket to prevent glaze creep. This slip is quite messy at first but if you sponge around the join you will leave only the join holding the slip. I use this method because I throw seperate trays to go under each pot.With these techniques all I do to remove the ring stand and tray is a light tap around the tray and they will invariable drop of quite clean. Little grinding left to do. At times they self seperate when the pots are unloaded................So my Vote is Alumina and Glue

Bill Powell Australia

Crystal greetings from the land of Oz
   
mohawkpiper
Glaze Guru

Posts: 659
Registered: Mar 2011
 Posted April 25th, 2011 05:54 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
also chiming in on an old thread...
Neil, you ever figure out what was with the color difference with your b-mix?

I use b-mix quite often. a little while back i got a box that was different than most. i think it was more on the yellow/tan side. (i usually buy just a box or two at a time.) i asked the supplier about it and they said it was probably b-mix with grog. but the box was unmarked as far as grog goes. i didnt even know there was a difference (bmix vs bmix w/grog) until then. I have never been asked which i wanted before, just given a box. i asked what grog was (i know now, but didnt at the time). they said it was a finer particle (they dont all know what they are talking about i guess, cuz i now know its not finer, b-mix without grog is finer.) So i was misinformed, but because of that, i was buying b-mix WITH grog for a bit. Sometimes the boxes would come marked as just b-mix, sometimes marked as b-mix with grog. but they always had grog in them. anyhow, i now know the difference, and i dont like the grog much, but there was a slight difference in color. and from that i learned the retailers dont always know what they have, are selling, or what they are talking about.

btw, my b-mix is from the west coast.

so, could it be grog vs no grog? or do you think its something else?

greg

animator by day, potter by night
   
Terry Fallon
Forum Sponser

Posts: 410
Registered: Jan 2009
 Posted April 26th, 2011 04:46 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
plastic vitroxplastic vitrox. K2O/Na2O/CaO×Al2O3×10SiO2—a plastic high-potash feldspathic ...

B mix was made with it.

Now there is none in it.

What do I win?

§terry
   
mohawkpiper
Glaze Guru

Posts: 659
Registered: Mar 2011
 Posted April 27th, 2011 04:17 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
how about the satisfaction that you have made me (and possibly others) more knowledgeable?
or if you like i can mail you a piece of red velvet cake. my wife makes killer red velvet!
or a soda, i like soda.

sorry, ill try not to get sidetracked....


animator by day, potter by night
   
Ashley B
Know-It-All

Posts: 38
Registered: Feb 2009
 Posted August 11th, 2011 01:05 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
I've been using a mix of EPK with some silica in it--mostly because it's easily accessible as the college I'm at makes that for kiln wadding, and I'm too lazy to make up my own batch of stuff each time I try a crystal fire.

That being said, it doesn't work extremely well. I'm going to try EPK/glue, and Alumina/Glue. Is it just that one ingredient mixed with the glue until it is a consistency that can be applied to the base?

And related, I cannot find for the life of me a post I once read about a green wheel that can attach to a bench grinder to clean up the edges of pots, would anybody know what I'm talking about??
   
Marie Wright
Journeyman Crystallier

Posts: 179
Registered: Jan 2010
 Posted August 11th, 2011 01:45 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Ashley,

Here is a link to it: http://www.axner.com/green-wheel.aspx

This is a wonderful tool - you get tons of bang for your buck in my humble opinion.

Marie
   
Avi Harriman
Administrator

Posts: 1198
Registered: Dec 2008
 Posted August 11th, 2011 03:18 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Ashley,

Welcome to the Never Ending Story.

Some of US use EPK and wood glue and find that it works very well.

Some of THEM use Alumina Hydrate and plain old white glue and also find that it works very well.

We think it might depend on your clay body so try both.

The one common thread is that your pot and riser must both be perfectly flat and as close to the same diameter as possible.

One dirty little secret. Occasionally one of my risers pops off while glazing and I do not want to mix up some EPK/glue for one pot. I put it back together with just wood glue and it works just fine (but don't tell anyone else).


Be well, do good work, and keep in touch
   
mohawkpiper
Glaze Guru

Posts: 659
Registered: Mar 2011
 Posted August 11th, 2011 04:22 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Avi, i also use EPK and wood glue. so that i dont have to mix up a tiny little batch if i want to attach just one pot or whatever, i mixed up a large batch a long time ago. seriously, a LARGE batch, and by a long time ago i mean ive probably only made two batches since i started doing this a year ago. i keep it in an airtight container. it hasnt gone bad yet. sometimes it gets a little dry i guess (probably from the wood glue drying out some) but when its a bit too pasty thick i just add a tiny little bit of water and its like magic! back to how it was the first time i mixed it together!

i never have to mix a new batch when i attach pedestals. its always ready to go when i want it.

animator by day, potter by night
   



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Crystalline Glaze Forum :: DISCUSSION AREA :: THE VAULT: Useful Technical Threads :: EPK/Alumina/Biscuit SmackDown
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