The Record Room / The Rubber Room / Archives / 07-08-2011 / Everything I Needed to Know, I Learned on Freak Out!

Topie: Everything I Needed to Know, I Learned on Freak Out! Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
December 3rd, 2010 01:11 PM
Jon
Quote:
Beckner wrote:
Zappa found out in the mid Eighties that his birth certificate read "Frank" and not "Francis" like his father, so he changed it for the reissue.

(Look at me, acting smart, after reading a Wiki.)


But of course, we want the original for our iTunes because we're completists like that.

December 3rd, 2010 01:13 PM
Jon I swear, I am not sabotaging this thread. This stuff is all just to enhance Ian's amazing writing. And while he's preparing the next segment, I'm gonna keep posting these -- you're gonna need 'em.

UPGRADE on this one. WAY upgrade from anything I've yet seen.



edit: turns out, the version that circulates was someone's lame attempt to recreate the cover. I found a clear photo of the actual Capitol label from an 8-track -- so replaced all the cover elements. The fonts aren't exact matches, but they're close.



USE THIS ONE. I swear, I'm done upgrading this one.
(Edited by Jon)
December 3rd, 2010 01:37 PM
Jon And now I'm just getting ahead of myself. But this is a repro of the VERY RARE Australian vinyl issue of "We're Only In It For The Money." Has the Sgt. Pepper parody cover on the *front*, the way Zappa intended. Only in Australia (well, and Korea or something) did it come out that way.


December 3rd, 2010 02:09 PM
Leo K Thanks Jon!!! These are great!!!
December 3rd, 2010 02:14 PM
halleluwah
Quote:
Jon wrote:
I swear, I am not sabotaging this thread. This stuff is all just to enhance Ian's amazing writing. And while he's preparing the next segment, I'm gonna keep posting these -- you're gonna need 'em.

UPGRADE on this one. WAY upgrade from anything I've yet seen.



edit: turns out, the version that circulates was someone's lame attempt to recreate the cover. I found a clear photo of the actual Capitol label from an 8-track -- so replaced all the cover elements. The fonts aren't exact matches, but they're close.



USE THIS ONE. I swear, I'm done upgrading this one.
(Edited by Jon)



:D

Right the fuck on. Great job with all of those. It's comforting to know there's someone else here as anal about getting typefaces and logos and shit accurate for stuff like this as I am. I used to do a kind of recreation like that for the cover every time I burned a CD. Of course, that was before I realized that putting every damn burned CD I have into a jewel case with artwork was taking up way too damn much space in my home...I've got shelves full of the things.

Don't point and laugh. It's a hobby, dammit.
December 3rd, 2010 02:27 PM
Jon HA! Yeah, I used to do that too!! I mean, to the point where if my Beatles CDs didn't have the white border around the cover where the slick sits on the white back cover thing, and that little half-circle in the upper right, I'd get upset about it.

Now I just do it for iTunes. Same compulsion, different end!!

The Zappa stuff is weird because when Ryko and the Zappa family reissued this stuff, they kind of half-assed the cover art. Messed around with it, frequently reduced the sizes, etc. It's...FINE and all...but if you love his cover art as much as I do (and I do) it's entirely impossible to find quality reproductions of this stuff on the webs, because the originals they're pulling from are already compromised.
December 3rd, 2010 02:36 PM
Andy B This thread is turning into one serious piece of work. The writing, the music and now the cover art. Sweet Jesus, it's really all too much. This weekened is dedicated to Zappa so i can have chance to catch up on it all. Absolutely amazing.

Regards the Bobby Jameson tracks a few pages back. The Reconsider Baby single was properly released - the copy i have is a promo (i don't know if it ever really made into the shops) on Penthouse. Strangely the credits show that it was produced by Norm Ratner, but arranged by Norm with Ken Handler. No mention of Zappa. Though of course Jameson in his own blog said that Zappa worked on that one as well, so who knows?? The b-side is Lowdown Funky Blues which is just Jameson and his guitar.

The Roogalator single also credits the production to Norm Ratner, but this time definitely credits Zappa as arranger.

Also there is a possibility that some Mothers (not necessarily Zappa) ended up on the single by Vito & The Hands. This is a Kim Fowley produced job from sometime in 66, with some folks saying the assorted Mothers helped out. But again who knows for sure?
December 3rd, 2010 02:56 PM
Beckner I don't think it's any secret that I've taken extreme baby steps with Zappa over the course of the past decade (or more? idk.) Anyway, jeez, I just did a comparison between the Ryko Freak Out and the original (MOFO) mix. What the shit? The Ryko version is terrible.
December 3rd, 2010 02:56 PM
Jon Again, getting ahead of myself, but it's slow at work today. Lovingly restored from someone's ring-wear-laden vinyl scan and a couple of other sources:


December 3rd, 2010 02:58 PM
Jon
Quote:
Beckner wrote:
I don't think it's any secret that I've taken extreme baby steps with Zappa over the course of the past decade (or more? idk.) Anyway, jeez, I just did a comparison between the Ryko Freak Out and the original (MOFO) mix. What the shit? The Ryko version is terrible.


Well, don't blame Ryko. Those remixes were all done by Zappa himself in a fit of insanity. If you REALLY wanna make yourself insane, A/B the Lumpy Money "We're Only In It" with the original Ryko version with *re-recorded bass and drums.* Ha.
December 3rd, 2010 03:08 PM
Beckner Yeah, sucks, I've been listening to the Ryko version for a decade!

I'm listening to *a* copy of "Money" currently, that I had already, not sure of its vintage. It never made too much sense, and I didn't like it much, but right now it sounds a bit genius. I'll get "Lumpy Money" like, right now.
December 3rd, 2010 03:09 PM
Jon
Quote:
Beckner wrote:
Yeah, sucks, I've been listening to the Ryko version for a decade!

I'm listening to *a* copy of "Money" currently, that I had already, not sure of its vintage. It never made too much sense, and I didn't like it much, but right now it sounds a bit genius. I'll get "Lumpy Money" like, right now.


It's totally worth having, but I bet Ian's chronological handling of that portion will contain some kind of needledrop of some kind (just guessing). Was there a mono "Money?"
December 3rd, 2010 03:18 PM
Beckner BTW this is why Baltimore is better than everywhere:



December 3rd, 2010 03:31 PM
Jon Meat, from 3 different image sources, with all the original logos/cover elements. The CD version is HEAVILY cropped from the vinyl. I left off the huge "MOTHERS" sticker.


December 3rd, 2010 03:36 PM
MoogDroog Wow, that's a hell of an album cover! Never seen that before at all
December 3rd, 2010 03:46 PM
Jon
Quote:
MoogDroog wrote:
Wow, that's a hell of an album cover! Never seen that before at all


Isn't that awesome? The genius of Cal Schenkel.
December 3rd, 2010 03:55 PM
Jon RZZZZZ! Again from 2 separate image sources! By the great Neon Park:



December 3rd, 2010 03:56 PM
Leo K I just got that Uncle Meat on vinyl, and the cover is glorious!

My favorite--so far-- is probably the Ruben and the Jets cover, but Hot Rats is up there too.



December 3rd, 2010 04:05 PM
Chris D.
Quote:
Beckner wrote:
Yeah, sucks, I've been listening to the Ryko version for a decade!

I'm listening to *a* copy of "Money" currently, that I had already, not sure of its vintage. It never made too much sense, and I didn't like it much, but right now it sounds a bit genius. I'll get "Lumpy Money" like, right now.


Nice! Isn't Money great? It's like if Smile was actually finished, and then some.

I actually like Zappa's reworkings. Not in place of the originals, but I think they're cool. You've gotta hear the 80s Money at least once to hear the uncensored lines. And I do like his 80s remix of Freak Out!.
December 3rd, 2010 04:07 PM
Chris D.
Quote:
Jon wrote:


It's totally worth having, but I bet Ian's chronological handling of that portion will contain some kind of needledrop of some kind (just guessing). Was there a mono "Money?"


That's what's on Lumpy Money. You've got the 80s version, then the 90s single CD (which is the 60s stereo), and the 60s mono mix on Lumpy Money.
December 3rd, 2010 04:10 PM
Jon

Here's Weeny -- sorry it's only 400x400, but I wanted to find a source that didn't crop half an inch around the entire image like the stupid CD.
December 3rd, 2010 04:20 PM
halleluwah Anybody ever seen one of these in the flesh? I just had to Google it to find out what it even looked like.



In the original liners for Freak Out, there was an offer to send away for these, but I've never actually seen a real one.


Also, if you go here, you can see some high-quality scans of the Absolutely Free libretto, which I had also never seen before.
December 3rd, 2010 04:59 PM
Jon You know how you take a photo of a photo, and you lose quality? Yeah, that's what they did for the official Hot Rats reissue.

THEIRS:



MINE (lovingly restored from a hi-res scan of actual vinyl, with tons of ringwear):



Look at all the information you lost on the official issue!
December 3rd, 2010 05:00 PM
Jon ...and now I must go home and beat the snow. I'll let Ian catch up with the images now!
December 3rd, 2010 05:18 PM
the captain
Quote:
Jon wrote:
...and now I must go home and beat the snow. I'll let Ian catch up with the images now!
Man, it's been snowing since like 12:45, so you didn't beat it! Good luck though.
December 3rd, 2010 05:29 PM
IanWagner Chronology 1967 Part 2

http://www.sendspace.com/file/3rgazo


When the original Capitol version of Lumpy Gravy was scheduled to finally see official release on the archival set The Lumpy Money Project/Object, it was assumed by collectors that the same version that had appeared on the bootleg market would be used.
But in fact, the Lumpy Money release contained a slightly different assembly of the material, resulting in yet another unique version of Lumpy Gravy.
With the "final" version in place, the album was scheduled for release on the Capitol label, credited to Frank Zappa as a solo artist, in August.
Only a week after the Gravy sessions, Zappa and The Mothers left Los Angeles in a semi-permanent fashion. They had received an offer to undertake a residency at New York City's Garrick Theater. Zappa decided to move the group there indefinitely. It is to his group's credit that they uprooted themselves, so far from friends and family, to follow Zappa's muse.
A major reason for the relocation was that, simply, there was no work for The Mothers in Hollywood in early 1967. The Sunset Strip youth vs. police riots had forced the closing of most rock clubs, and in the case of the Whisky A-Go-Go, the club's focus became soul music. The Mothers depended upon money from stage work, so the New York move was partly made out of financial desperation. The Garrick residency wouldn't pay much, but it was at least a regular paycheck. Also, there was a familiarity factor with LA audiences and the group. The recent Balloon Farm engagement in New York was the first Mothers appearance that had garnered true excitement, in recent memory.
But perhaps the most important factor for Zappa was that he had become entirely disenchanted with the West Coast counterculture. LA had become a haven for bus-arriving dropouts and weekend tourists, nowhere near the aware, subversive force for social change that Frank had envisioned on the Freak Out album. And even though The Mothers had a big following in San Francisco, that city's culture nauseated Zappa utterly.
In New York, there was a serious arts community, and Zappa hoped he would gain respect and attention from that world.
The Garrick residency, which stretched on-and-off from late March through early September, is without a doubt the most legendary live engagement Zappa and The Mothers ever played. Part of the reason for this, besides the legends, tall tales and undoubtedly, great shows played, is that remarkably, no audio evidence of the performances has come to light. Considering Zappa's past and future obsessiveness in capturing documentary recordings, this seems fairly astounding. And absence builds legends.
Thankfully, one audience member, closet freak ad-agency animator Ed Seeman, blown away by the group, decided to document at least two shows by making his own colour silent super-8 films at the Garrick. Pieces of this footage have appeared in a few official Zappa projects, as well as posthumous documentaries. Seeman was also allowed to film a few other very important moments in this crucial Mothers era.
Stories about the Garrick shows are too numerous to mention in detail, and some will be told by Zappa himself in audio interviews.
But a few small anecdotes: Zappa's taunting of audiences became a true artform during the Garrick shows, with Frank greeting the suburban-tourist-gawker weekend crowds with a cheery "Hello, pigs!".
With their equipment set up in a semi-permanent fashion, the group could employ more elaborate props and sets. A clothesline was strung up from the stage to the lighting booth, and surprise objects would be sent down the line, including vegetables, raw meat, toys, etc.
One toy that assumed a totemistic ritual status was a large toy giraffe. The giraffe was rigged with a tube between its legs, that was filled with whipped cream. At a certain point in the show, the giraffe would be held up in front of the audience, who would then be squirted with the cream.
One regular stage piece was enitled Dead Air, where the group would suddenly stop playing, and commence to behave in a domestic fashion, sitting down in lawn chairs and performing various menial tasks. This would continue until the audience became violently upset.
On an infamous occasion, a few GI's on leave from Vietnam came in during the soundcheck for the night's show. The Mothers crew were worried, until it was revealed that the servicemen were big Mothers fans. Zappa quickly came up with a plan, enlisting the man on his own subversive maneuvers. Near the end of the show, he brought the men up to scream nonsense into a microphone. Then, he produced a baby doll and handed it to them, telling them "show us what you'd do with a gook baby!". The men proceeded to rip the doll to pieces and stomp it to dust. Zappa then cued the lightman to turn off the lights, and the show was over. One of Zappa's most chilling pieces of social commentary passed into lore.
The Mothers at the Garrick became such a reliable attraction, spread through word-of-mouth, that they became a type of art installation. Of course, what many people came for was the antics, not the music.
But some did come for the music, and would become trusted friends of the band, and even band members. One of these was Ian Underwood, a type of prodigy genius, who could play horns and keyboards. Approaching Zappa to tell him he would like to be a Mother, Frank auditioned and then hired him on the spot. Underwood would become an invaluable addition to Zappa's music.
Ruth Komanoff, a truly astounding marimbist-percussionist, saw the band several times and Zappa eventually found about about her talent as a musician. She was invited to sit in on a few occasions, would play on some studio sessions, and would eventually marry Underwood and become one of the most fondly-regarded Mothers of all.
Booked as an opening act for some of the shows was singer-songwriter Sandy Hurvitz, who specialised in very idiosyncratic, though beautiful, piano-vocal compositions.
Zappa was very impressed by her, and invited her to take part in some of the shows as well. Zappa declared her to be Uncle Meat, a moniker recently dreamed up by Ray Collins at a rehearsal.
Zappa even managed to get Hurvitz signed to Verve, and intended to produce her debut himself. But after just one day, the psychologically erratic and difficult artist proved too difficult to work with, and Zappa passed the job over to Underwood.
This would eventually result in an album released on Verve, which quickly became an obscurity. Hurvitz would eventually marry record producer Frazier Mohawk (nee Barry Friedman) and change her name to Essra Mohawk, recording two album for Reprise, including the critically acclaimed Primordial Lovers.
But Hurvitz' greatest gift to The Mothers was the introduction to Zappa of her former boyfriend, visual artist Cal Schenkel. This was the man who would become Zappa's greatest visual collaborator, providing a very distinct artistic identity for many Zappa album covers.
Records by The Mothers continued to be issued by Verve through the spring and early summer, including the Big Leg Emma/Why Don'tcha Do Me Right 45, a commercial bomb, and Absolutely Free, a surprising commercial success that managed to just miss the LP chart Top 40 by one notch.
Zappa found a new studio base at Mayfair Studios, which was run a very overworked, though talented engineer, Gary Kellgren. Mayfair had been previously utilised by Jimi Hendrix and, yes, The Velvet Underground, who would record their second album at the same time as Zappa's upcoming project.
Frank had been creating a song cycle and concept for the next Mothers album, based upon his anger towards the falsities of the hippie counterculture, and of course, parental-governmental neglect and hypocrisy, mixed in with a few personal reminiscences.
The visual linchpin for the project came when The Beatles' immediately-enshrined Sgt. Pepper was released at the beginning of June. Zappa did notice the influence of Freak Out's approach on Sgt. Pepper, but was slightly mystified by the amount of serious attention it garnered, while his own work was ghettoised as "comedy music".
He decided to both beat 'em and join 'em at the same time, by creating a Mothers version of the Pepper cover. And for a title, he came up with the catchy, confrontational and thought-provoking phrase We're Only In It For The Money.
Documentation regarding exact dates of the New York sessions is frustratingly shadowy. For instance, it is known that the cover of Money was shot on July 18th, and this predated the first known session dates for the album's musical contents. This cannot be the case, but for the purposes of this overview, we will go with the established dates known as of this writing.
For the cover, Zappa made the important decision to enlist Schenkel to create the collage elements and dummy-figures to stand alongside the group. The process of creating and shooting the cover was filmed by both Ed Seeman and Schenkel. The pictures themselves were taken by fashion photographer Jerry Schatzberg, who would later become an acclaimed director of cult films.
Jimi Hendrix happened to be in town, and Zappa invited him to stand for the cover shots, which Hendrix accepted. The Mothers were dressed in drag, with Zappa as a little girl in pigtails, with his heavily pregnant "pumpkin" Gail right beside him. Although he wasn't producing the album, Tom WIlson was also in the picture at far right, in a high school sweater. The Mothers' name was not spelled out in flowers ala Beatles but, naturally, in fruits and vegetables. The background collage of faces, including such notorious faces as Lee Harvey Oswald in the process of being shot by Jack Ruby, was pasted in after the fact, unlike The Beatles' full-size cutout approach. Other faces that can be spotted include a few of Zappa's favourite composers, as well as Eric Burdon, Nancy Sinatra, David Crosby, Elvis, Ed Wynn, Theda Bara and Jack Ruby. For the inside gatefold, a posed portrait of the group (now including Ian Underwood) against a yellow background, another satire of Pepper's design, was taken.
The result was a wicked and on-the-button satiric conception of what was then considered absolutely sacrosanct in the world of modern pop culture and even art, but it would cause Zappa much trouble with MGM, the third cover design in a row to do so.
The first track recorded at Mayfair that we have a distinct tracking date for is Valerie, a cover of one of Zappa's all-time favourite R&B singles by Jackie & The Starlites. A perfect showcase for singer Ray Collins and the Pachuco-falsetto of Roy Estrada, this extremely faithful performance is a gem.
It is also important in that it shows that the eventual concept for the Cruising With Ruben And The Jets project was originally part of the Money concept. When Money took on its own final form, Valerie was shelved, and surprisingly not resurrected for Jets. Zappa would record the song gain in 1969 with a later Mothers lineup, and this would be included on the Burnt Weeny Sandwich album. The 1967 take would go unissued until the 21st-century archival collection spotlighting Jets, Greasy Love Songs.
Further spotlighting the original tenuous definition of the Money and Jets projects is the next track with a defined recording date, Stuff Up The Cracks. This Zappa composition was a truly mutant take on the doo-wop and death-rock genres, with the typical lovelorn teenage protagonist of the 50's ballad moved to threaten suicide if his girlfriend leaves him.
Another perfect showcase for the velvety vocals of Ray Collins, this song eventually takes off into progressive musical territory, with Zappa taking a blazing, fierce wah-wah guitar solo that took the song past the 6-minute mark.
When the track was eventually issued as the closer of the Ruben And The Jets LP, this schizoid cut seemed to lead out of the old-school Jets concept back into a more contemporary Mothers musical approach. But with the recording date now known, it can in fact be seen as a progression-regression into the Jets concept.
The original conception of the song can be heard in two forms, a 6-minute mix eventually released on Greasy Love Songs, and also in a four-minute mix of just the guitar-solo finale. This latter version made it to collectors' circles as part of a work acetate of rough Money mixes, misleadingly "released" under the title Money Demos. This inclusion shows that the song was at least briefly considered as part of the Money album.
The fact that the vocal section was removed from this mix perhaps reflects a major, shocking development from the end of July, when Ray Collins abruptly left The Mothers, returning to the West Coast.
Collins would return to the band before the summer was out, but in the interim, the entire next Mothers LP would be recorded without him, rendering him in effect as a non-essential component of the group.
Also during this time, MGM finally stepped in on the eve of Capitol's release of Lumpy Gravy. They declared that Zappa's talents as an artist were exclusively contracted to them, lock stock and barrel. After reading the fine print of their contract, Zappa, manager Herb Cohen and Capitol had no choice but to agree, and the album was pulled, but not before a few copies made it to stores in the 8-track cartridge format.
Zappa and Cohen eventually managed to persuade MGM to pay out Capitol's investment in Gravy, and the masters were turned over to Frank, presumably for release on Verve. But by then, Frank's studio approach had radically changed, and he decided on a totally new conception of the piece, which would be enacted in the fall of 1967.
Sometime during the summer, Frank did a live interview with Matty Biberfeld, broadcast on progressive FM station WRVR. Four excerpts from this interview were later released on The MOFO Project/Object collection, as they had direct bearing upon the Freak Out era. In "Dope Fiend Music", he talks about MGM's censorship and the hidden expletive in The Return of The Son Of Monster Magnet. In "Poop Rock", he discusses current musical trends and what he feels to be the influence of Freak Out on The Beatles' Lovely Rita. In "Machinery", the overseas popularity of Freak Out is discussed. In "Psychedelic Money" he declares that as far as he is concened, he owns the phrase and concept "freak out" (onto the end of this is grafted a 1993 interview snippet discussing Who Are The Brain Police).
Mothers fan, documentarian and ad-animator Ed Seeman somehow managed to get Zappa some work providing jingles for a couple of his clients that summer.
One of the resulting jingles that proved too weird for the clients to actually utilise was an ad for Remington Electric Razor (this was likely recorded later on back in LA during the Uncle Meat era, but is placed here for "conceptual continuity"). For this crazed minute of sound, Zappa utilised his own varispeeded voice for the narration, and the music was also heavily treated as well. For the perky female voice on the main jingle, Zappa called upon Linda Ronstadt, then lead singer of The Stone Poneys. What probably kept the jingle from being used was the closing narration, which states "Cleans you, thrills you, may even keep you from getting busted!". This delightful track was eventually leaked by someone within the Zappa circle on a bootleg album where it served as the title track.
One of Zappa and Seeman's collaborations did make it to television screens, an ad for Luden's Cough Drops. Not only was this televised, it even won the Best Score award at the advertising world's equvialent of The Oscars, The Clio Awards. This 45-second varispeeded vocal-vibes creation, broken up with coughs and snorks, was entitled The Big Squeeze and eventually released on the archival collection The Lost Episodes.
The main sessions for the bulk of We're Only In It For The Money are dated as taking place from August 2nd through the 9th at Mayfair, and luckily Ed Seeman and Cal Schenkel's cameras captured some footage of the working process. As this studio was much cheaper to rent than any LA studio, Zappa was able to return to the style of audio-verite and experimental recording he had been fond of in the late 50's and early 60's.
He conducted a lot of avant-musical tape constructions during this era, and some of this would be included on the next album releases. These spacy works contained chopped-up bits of instrumental noodling, various sound effects and samples, as well as snorks by road manager Dick Barber panned across the stereo soundstage, all sped up and slowed-down to varying degrees.
One of these pieces was later combined with the "piano" chatter recorded during the final Lumpy Gravy sessions to form a construction entitled Dense Slight.
He recorded much spoken-word material during this time as well, and some of it would find its way onto Money, Lumpy Gravy and Uncle Meat.
During one of these occasions, he recorded engineer Gary Kellgren's demented and exhausted whispering monologue that would later make it onto Money in partial form. In this, the engineer complains about his lack of money, even though he has two hit records on the charts. He wearily delclares that he will be recording Zappa day after day, at the same time as he is working with The Velvet Underground, who he declares to be "as shitty a group as Frank Zappa's group". He also mentions that Zappa is turning knobs, because producers love to turn knobs, as "they think it is the way they can create".
Perhaps the most famous spoken bit from this era however is The Mothers drummer's cheery announcement "Hi boys and girls, I'm Jimmy Carl Black and I'm the Indian of the group!", followed by a "cheesy" laugh.
These two pieces were intercut and topped with a snork, for a working piece Zappa entitled Intelligent Design, later released on The Lumpy Money Project.
The "straightest" song in Zappa's new bag of songs to be recorded was Lonely Little Girl, likely meant as another bid for accessible single release. But though it may have been fairly accessible for Zappa, it was still a very complicated mini-symphony in itself. An initial instrumental version of the song was recorded, with dizzying time and signature changes but a lovely, bittersweet feeling in the melodies. This was eventually issued (subtitled Original Composition - Take 24) on The Lumpy Money Project.
A similarly ambitious and striking composition was Absolutely Free, which had already been tried at the Big Leg Emma singles session. The basic track of this work was released on Lumpy Money. Without the many overdubs heard on the original Money LP release, the true beauty of this composition can be heard. Zappa's rare usage of acoustic guitar, the martial drum rhythms, Don Preston's stately piano and harpsichord work are to the fore.
A goofy bit of spoken-word monologue from Roy Estrada, dubbed Hamburgers Make Me Sleepy and likely from this period, had made it to collectors' circles.
The brief but deadly accurate critique of Middle American sexual mores, Harry You're A Beast, was originally composed in musical form, with the lyrics added at a later stage. In the backing track heard on Lumpy Money, we hear an opening, florid piano improvisation by Don Preston, cutting into the main theme which, without the lyrics, is one of Zappa's cheeriest pieces of music. It can also be heard, with vocals added, on the rough mix acetate of Money material.
Here, Zappa's ingenuity in creating the vocal identity of the Money album should be discussed. Zappa clearly intended this to be a vocal-oriented project, and many of the songs were among his most melodic. The problem was that Ray Collins, the singer utilised on almost all of Zappa's more melodic compositions to that point, had just left the group.
Zappa solved this though the magic of varispeeded vocal harmony. He would record a main vocal, usually above his comfortable low range, and mask the inherent shakiness and any pitch variation by speeding up the result, then layering it with another vocal, sometimes up to four tracks of his own voice, all given varying levels of pitch and speed variation.
What resulted was a very distinct and unique vocal identity that many listeners do not even recognise as Zappa's own distinctive voice. This was one of the most impressive, though least remarked-upon, artistic victories of the Money project.
On the rough acetate, we hear a mix which is noticeably less sped-up than the final master. Also, one can hear the "Don't come in me, in me" refrain which would later be turned backwards for the master at the insistence of MGM.
What's The Ugliest Part Of Your Body was another of Zappa's angriest lyrical attacks on the American straight adult world. Musically, it was a twisted R&B ballad variation led by the standard piano triplets and some nice guitar work later buried on the final master. It is broken up by a fast, classical-influenced midsection. On the full backing track heard on Lumpy Money, we hear the song's full arrangement, where the tape is gradually sped up until the song's chaotic collapse.
For the Money album, the song was split into two parts, the main section appearing on the first side, a reprise of the man theme appearing on the second. This was in place from an early stage, as rough mixes of both parts of this conception, with sped-up lead vocals and a fine Mothers backup choir, as well as the small part of the midsection and concluding musical movement cut for the final master, appear on the Money acetate.
The Idiot Bastard Son, one of Zappa's finest songs, written about his old friend Kenny Williams, was one of the great products of the Money sessions. A snippet of tomfoolery during the vocal session for the song was included on Lumpy Money, under the title Idiot Bastard Snoop. Also heard on that collection is the backing track for the song, where many layered elements of instrumentation buried in the final master can be heard. There is acoustic guitar, slowed-down military drums, Bunk Gardner's beautiful woodwinds work, a surprising usage of sitar, an undertow of fuzz-guitar and an overall sense of grandeur.
The rough acetate mix of Son features a Zappa vocal much less reliant on varispeed effects (check out the falsetto on the bridge!), and a greater amount of sitar compared to the final master, as well as a total lack of spoken-word cut-ins.
Besides Hendrix, Zappa was able to lure yet another guitar hero into taking part in the Money project. This was Eric Clapton, who Zappa recorded undertaking a few spoken-word pieces, two of which would be heard at key points in the Money album. One unused comic snippet, dubbed "The World Will Be A Far Happier Place", was released on The Lumpy Money Project.
The final form of Lonely Little Girl, now given a nearly acid-blues slant with the heavy usage of fuzz guitar, appears in first-movement backing-track form on Lumpy Money, showcasing many previously-buried musical elements including concert tympani and acoustic guitar, the latter of which is deftly varispeeded for the finale.
The acetate rough mix of the track has no vocals, suggesting lyrics were a very late addition to the song. This contains the second movement of the song, as well orchestral cut-ins from the Lumpy Gravy session version of the Oh No theme.
The most dead serious work on Money was the utterly chilling critique of the parents of counterculture children being beaten and killed at the hands of the police, Mom And Dad. The beautiful melody of this piece, and the finely-recorded backing track (featurning many layers of intricate guitar work) are well spotlighted on the instrumental mix heard on Lumpy Money.
The acetate rough mix of Mom And Dad is preceded, just as it would be on Money, by the vaudeville-style brief parental comic jab Bow Tie Daddy. The Mom And Dad mix has the main verse vocals, perhaps Zappa's most heartfelt vocal performance, but the long first break section is still in instrumental form.
The next track recorded would be the first "song" heard on the Money album, and just as perfect a scene-setter as Hungry Freaks Daddy and Plastic People had been for the first two Mothers albums.
December 3rd, 2010 05:30 PM
IanWagner
Quote:
Jon wrote:
You know how you take a photo of a photo, and you lose quality? Yeah, that's what they did for the official Hot Rats reissue.

THEIRS:



MINE (lovingly restored from a hi-res scan of actual vinyl, with tons of ringwear):



Look at all the information you lost on the official issue!



Aww, look at Christine!
December 3rd, 2010 05:55 PM
andy rooney i'm through disc 3 and all caught up on the reading, looking forward to 1967 part 2.

the music.....really fun stuff to listen to. grunion run blew me out of my sunburned skin. opus 5, jesus. listened to the whole concert last night, sun going down over the ocean. beer and smoke out on the veranda and the hair on my goddamn neck was standing up. quite an experience.

just gotta say, ian. reading your stuff is a blast as always. and the listening has been superb. wish i could listen faster!

zappa's nuts like a fox. aloha!

ahh, and here's part 2!

Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
Chronology 1967 Part 2

http://www.sendspace.com/file/3rgazo


When the original Capitol version of Lumpy Gravy was scheduled to finally see official release on the archival set The Lumpy Money Project/Object, it was assumed by collectors that the same version that had appeared on the bootleg market would be used.
But in fact, the Lumpy Money release contained a slightly different assembly of the material, resulting in yet another unique version of Lumpy Gravy.
With the "final" version in place, the album was scheduled for release on the Capitol label, credited to Frank Zappa as a solo artist, in August.
Only a week after the Gravy sessions, Zappa and The Mothers left Los Angeles in a semi-permanent fashion. They had received an offer to undertake a residency at New York City's Garrick Theater. Zappa decided to move the group there indefinitely. It is to his group's credit that they uprooted themselves, so far from friends and family, to follow Zappa's muse.
A major reason for the relocation was that, simply, there was no work for The Mothers in Hollywood in early 1967. The Sunset Strip youth vs. police riots had forced the closing of most rock clubs, and in the case of the Whisky A-Go-Go, the club's focus became soul music. The Mothers depended upon money from stage work, so the New York move was partly made out of financial desperation. The Garrick residency wouldn't pay much, but it was at least a regular paycheck. Also, there was a familiarity factor with LA audiences and the group. The recent Balloon Farm engagement in New York was the first Mothers appearance that had garnered true excitement, in recent memory.
But perhaps the most important factor for Zappa was that he had become entirely disenchanted with the West Coast counterculture. LA had become a haven for bus-arriving dropouts and weekend tourists, nowhere near the aware, subversive force for social change that Frank had envisioned on the Freak Out album. And even though The Mothers had a big following in San Francisco, that city's culture nauseated Zappa utterly.
In New York, there was a serious arts community, and Zappa hoped he would gain respect and attention from that world.
The Garrick residency, which stretched on-and-off from late March through early September, is without a doubt the most legendary live engagement Zappa and The Mothers ever played. Part of the reason for this, besides the legends, tall tales and undoubtedly, great shows played, is that remarkably, no audio evidence of the performances has come to light. Considering Zappa's past and future obsessiveness in capturing documentary recordings, this seems fairly astounding. And absence builds legends.
Thankfully, one audience member, closet freak ad-agency animator Ed Seeman, blown away by the group, decided to document at least two shows by making his own colour silent super-8 films at the Garrick. Pieces of this footage have appeared in a few official Zappa projects, as well as posthumous documentaries. Seeman was also allowed to film a few other very important moments in this crucial Mothers era.
Stories about the Garrick shows are too numerous to mention in detail, and some will be told by Zappa himself in audio interviews.
But a few small anecdotes: Zappa's taunting of audiences became a true artform during the Garrick shows, with Frank greeting the suburban-tourist-gawker weekend crowds with a cheery "Hello, pigs!".
With their equipment set up in a semi-permanent fashion, the group could employ more elaborate props and sets. A clothesline was strung up from the stage to the lighting booth, and surprise objects would be sent down the line, including vegetables, raw meat, toys, etc.
One toy that assumed a totemistic ritual status was a large toy giraffe. The giraffe was rigged with a tube between its legs, that was filled with whipped cream. At a certain point in the show, the giraffe would be held up in front of the audience, who would then be squirted with the cream.
One regular stage piece was enitled Dead Air, where the group would suddenly stop playing, and commence to behave in a domestic fashion, sitting down in lawn chairs and performing various menial tasks. This would continue until the audience became violently upset.
On an infamous occasion, a few GI's on leave from Vietnam came in during the soundcheck for the night's show. The Mothers crew were worried, until it was revealed that the servicemen were big Mothers fans. Zappa quickly came up with a plan, enlisting the man on his own subversive maneuvers. Near the end of the show, he brought the men up to scream nonsense into a microphone. Then, he produced a baby doll and handed it to them, telling them "show us what you'd do with a gook baby!". The men proceeded to rip the doll to pieces and stomp it to dust. Zappa then cued the lightman to turn off the lights, and the show was over. One of Zappa's most chilling pieces of social commentary passed into lore.
The Mothers at the Garrick became such a reliable attraction, spread through word-of-mouth, that they became a type of art installation. Of course, what many people came for was the antics, not the music.
But some did come for the music, and would become trusted friends of the band, and even band members. One of these was Ian Underwood, a type of prodigy genius, who could play horns and keyboards. Approaching Zappa to tell him he would like to be a Mother, Frank auditioned and then hired him on the spot. Underwood would become an invaluable addition to Zappa's music.
Ruth Komanoff, a truly astounding marimbist-percussionist, saw the band several times and Zappa eventually found about about her talent as a musician. She was invited to sit in on a few occasions, would play on some studio sessions, and would eventually marry Underwood and become one of the most fondly-regarded Mothers of all.
Booked as an opening act for some of the shows was singer-songwriter Sandy Hurvitz, who specialised in very idiosyncratic, though beautiful, piano-vocal compositions.
Zappa was very impressed by her, and invited her to take part in some of the shows as well. Zappa declared her to be Uncle Meat, a moniker recently dreamed up by Ray Collins at a rehearsal.
Zappa even managed to get Hurvitz signed to Verve, and intended to produce her debut himself. But after just one day, the psychologically erratic and difficult artist proved too difficult to work with, and Zappa passed the job over to Underwood.
This would eventually result in an album released on Verve, which quickly became an obscurity. Hurvitz would eventually marry record producer Frazier Mohawk (nee Barry Friedman) and change her name to Essra Mohawk, recording two album for Reprise, including the critically acclaimed Primordial Lovers.
But Hurvitz' greatest gift to The Mothers was the introduction to Zappa of her former boyfriend, visual artist Cal Schenkel. This was the man who would become Zappa's greatest visual collaborator, providing a very distinct artistic identity for many Zappa album covers.
Records by The Mothers continued to be issued by Verve through the spring and early summer, including the Big Leg Emma/Why Don'tcha Do Me Right 45, a commercial bomb, and Absolutely Free, a surprising commercial success that managed to just miss the LP chart Top 40 by one notch.
Zappa found a new studio base at Mayfair Studios, which was run a very overworked, though talented engineer, Gary Kellgren. Mayfair had been previously utilised by Jimi Hendrix and, yes, The Velvet Underground, who would record their second album at the same time as Zappa's upcoming project.
Frank had been creating a song cycle and concept for the next Mothers album, based upon his anger towards the falsities of the hippie counterculture, and of course, parental-governmental neglect and hypocrisy, mixed in with a few personal reminiscences.
The visual linchpin for the project came when The Beatles' immediately-enshrined Sgt. Pepper was released at the beginning of June. Zappa did notice the influence of Freak Out's approach on Sgt. Pepper, but was slightly mystified by the amount of serious attention it garnered, while his own work was ghettoised as "comedy music".
He decided to both beat 'em and join 'em at the same time, by creating a Mothers version of the Pepper cover. And for a title, he came up with the catchy, confrontational and thought-provoking phrase We're Only In It For The Money.
Documentation regarding exact dates of the New York sessions is frustratingly shadowy. For instance, it is known that the cover of Money was shot on July 18th, and this predated the first known session dates for the album's musical contents. This cannot be the case, but for the purposes of this overview, we will go with the established dates known as of this writing.
For the cover, Zappa made the important decision to enlist Schenkel to create the collage elements and dummy-figures to stand alongside the group. The process of creating and shooting the cover was filmed by both Ed Seeman and Schenkel. The pictures themselves were taken by fashion photographer Jerry Schatzberg, who would later become an acclaimed director of cult films.
Jimi Hendrix happened to be in town, and Zappa invited him to stand for the cover shots, which Hendrix accepted. The Mothers were dressed in drag, with Zappa as a little girl in pigtails, with his heavily pregnant "pumpkin" Gail right beside him. Although he wasn't producing the album, Tom WIlson was also in the picture at far right, in a high school sweater. The Mothers' name was not spelled out in flowers ala Beatles but, naturally, in fruits and vegetables. The background collage of faces, including such notorious faces as Lee Harvey Oswald in the process of being shot by Jack Ruby, was pasted in after the fact, unlike The Beatles' full-size cutout approach. Other faces that can be spotted include a few of Zappa's favourite composers, as well as Eric Burdon, Nancy Sinatra, David Crosby, Elvis, Ed Wynn, Theda Bara and Jack Ruby. For the inside gatefold, a posed portrait of the group (now including Ian Underwood) against a yellow background, another satire of Pepper's design, was taken.
The result was a wicked and on-the-button satiric conception of what was then considered absolutely sacrosanct in the world of modern pop culture and even art, but it would cause Zappa much trouble with MGM, the third cover design in a row to do so.
The first track recorded at Mayfair that we have a distinct tracking date for is Valerie, a cover of one of Zappa's all-time favourite R&B singles by Jackie & The Starlites. A perfect showcase for singer Ray Collins and the Pachuco-falsetto of Roy Estrada, this extremely faithful performance is a gem.
It is also important in that it shows that the eventual concept for the Cruising With Ruben And The Jets project was originally part of the Money concept. When Money took on its own final form, Valerie was shelved, and surprisingly not resurrected for Jets. Zappa would record the song gain in 1969 with a later Mothers lineup, and this would be included on the Burnt Weeny Sandwich album. The 1967 take would go unissued until the 21st-century archival collection spotlighting Jets, Greasy Love Songs.
Further spotlighting the original tenuous definition of the Money and Jets projects is the next track with a defined recording date, Stuff Up The Cracks. This Zappa composition was a truly mutant take on the doo-wop and death-rock genres, with the typical lovelorn teenage protagonist of the 50's ballad moved to threaten suicide if his girlfriend leaves him.
Another perfect showcase for the velvety vocals of Ray Collins, this song eventually takes off into progressive musical territory, with Zappa taking a blazing, fierce wah-wah guitar solo that took the song past the 6-minute mark.
When the track was eventually issued as the closer of the Ruben And The Jets LP, this schizoid cut seemed to lead out of the old-school Jets concept back into a more contemporary Mothers musical approach. But with the recording date now known, it can in fact be seen as a progression-regression into the Jets concept.
The original conception of the song can be heard in two forms, a 6-minute mix eventually released on Greasy Love Songs, and also in a four-minute mix of just the guitar-solo finale. This latter version made it to collectors' circles as part of a work acetate of rough Money mixes, misleadingly "released" under the title Money Demos. This inclusion shows that the song was at least briefly considered as part of the Money album.
The fact that the vocal section was removed from this mix perhaps reflects a major, shocking development from the end of July, when Ray Collins abruptly left The Mothers, returning to the West Coast.
Collins would return to the band before the summer was out, but in the interim, the entire next Mothers LP would be recorded without him, rendering him in effect as a non-essential component of the group.
Also during this time, MGM finally stepped in on the eve of Capitol's release of Lumpy Gravy. They declared that Zappa's talents as an artist were exclusively contracted to them, lock stock and barrel. After reading the fine print of their contract, Zappa, manager Herb Cohen and Capitol had no choice but to agree, and the album was pulled, but not before a few copies made it to stores in the 8-track cartridge format.
Zappa and Cohen eventually managed to persuade MGM to pay out Capitol's investment in Gravy, and the masters were turned over to Frank, presumably for release on Verve. But by then, Frank's studio approach had radically changed, and he decided on a totally new conception of the piece, which would be enacted in the fall of 1967.
Sometime during the summer, Frank did a live interview with Matty Biberfeld, broadcast on progressive FM station WRVR. Four excerpts from this interview were later released on The MOFO Project/Object collection, as they had direct bearing upon the Freak Out era. In "Dope Fiend Music", he talks about MGM's censorship and the hidden expletive in The Return of The Son Of Monster Magnet. In "Poop Rock", he discusses current musical trends and what he feels to be the influence of Freak Out on The Beatles' Lovely Rita. In "Machinery", the overseas popularity of Freak Out is discussed. In "Psychedelic Money" he declares that as far as he is concened, he owns the phrase and concept "freak out" (onto the end of this is grafted a 1993 interview snippet discussing Who Are The Brain Police).
Mothers fan, documentarian and ad-animator Ed Seeman somehow managed to get Zappa some work providing jingles for a couple of his clients that summer.
One of the resulting jingles that proved too weird for the clients to actually utilise was an ad for Remington Electric Razor (this was likely recorded later on back in LA during the Uncle Meat era, but is placed here for "conceptual continuity"). For this crazed minute of sound, Zappa utilised his own varispeeded voice for the narration, and the music was also heavily treated as well. For the perky female voice on the main jingle, Zappa called upon Linda Ronstadt, then lead singer of The Stone Poneys. What probably kept the jingle from being used was the closing narration, which states "Cleans you, thrills you, may even keep you from getting busted!". This delightful track was eventually leaked by someone within the Zappa circle on a bootleg album where it served as the title track.
One of Zappa and Seeman's collaborations did make it to television screens, an ad for Luden's Cough Drops. Not only was this televised, it even won the Best Score award at the advertising world's equvialent of The Oscars, The Clio Awards. This 45-second varispeeded vocal-vibes creation, broken up with coughs and snorks, was entitled The Big Squeeze and eventually released on the archival collection The Lost Episodes.
The main sessions for the bulk of We're Only In It For The Money are dated as taking place from August 2nd through the 9th at Mayfair, and luckily Ed Seeman and Cal Schenkel's cameras captured some footage of the working process. As this studio was much cheaper to rent than any LA studio, Zappa was able to return to the style of audio-verite and experimental recording he had been fond of in the late 50's and early 60's.
He conducted a lot of avant-musical tape constructions during this era, and some of this would be included on the next album releases. These spacy works contained chopped-up bits of instrumental noodling, various sound effects and samples, as well as snorks by road manager Dick Barber panned across the stereo soundstage, all sped up and slowed-down to varying degrees.
One of these pieces was later combined with the "piano" chatter recorded during the final Lumpy Gravy sessions to form a construction entitled Dense Slight.
He recorded much spoken-word material during this time as well, and some of it would find its way onto Money, Lumpy Gravy and Uncle Meat.
During one of these occasions, he recorded engineer Gary Kellgren's demented and exhausted whispering monologue that would later make it onto Money in partial form. In this, the engineer complains about his lack of money, even though he has two hit records on the charts. He wearily delclares that he will be recording Zappa day after day, at the same time as he is working with The Velvet Underground, who he declares to be "as shitty a group as Frank Zappa's group". He also mentions that Zappa is turning knobs, because producers love to turn knobs, as "they think it is the way they can create".
Perhaps the most famous spoken bit from this era however is The Mothers drummer's cheery announcement "Hi boys and girls, I'm Jimmy Carl Black and I'm the Indian of the group!", followed by a "cheesy" laugh.
These two pieces were intercut and topped with a snork, for a working piece Zappa entitled Intelligent Design, later released on The Lumpy Money Project.
The "straightest" song in Zappa's new bag of songs to be recorded was Lonely Little Girl, likely meant as another bid for accessible single release. But though it may have been fairly accessible for Zappa, it was still a very complicated mini-symphony in itself. An initial instrumental version of the song was recorded, with dizzying time and signature changes but a lovely, bittersweet feeling in the melodies. This was eventually issued (subtitled Original Composition - Take 24) on The Lumpy Money Project.
A similarly ambitious and striking composition was Absolutely Free, which had already been tried at the Big Leg Emma singles session. The basic track of this work was released on Lumpy Money. Without the many overdubs heard on the original Money LP release, the true beauty of this composition can be heard. Zappa's rare usage of acoustic guitar, the martial drum rhythms, Don Preston's stately piano and harpsichord work are to the fore.
A goofy bit of spoken-word monologue from Roy Estrada, dubbed Hamburgers Make Me Sleepy and likely from this period, had made it to collectors' circles.
The brief but deadly accurate critique of Middle American sexual mores, Harry You're A Beast, was originally composed in musical form, with the lyrics added at a later stage. In the backing track heard on Lumpy Money, we hear an opening, florid piano improvisation by Don Preston, cutting into the main theme which, without the lyrics, is one of Zappa's cheeriest pieces of music. It can also be heard, with vocals added, on the rough mix acetate of Money material.
Here, Zappa's ingenuity in creating the vocal identity of the Money album should be discussed. Zappa clearly intended this to be a vocal-oriented project, and many of the songs were among his most melodic. The problem was that Ray Collins, the singer utilised on almost all of Zappa's more melodic compositions to that point, had just left the group.
Zappa solved this though the magic of varispeeded vocal harmony. He would record a main vocal, usually above his comfortable low range, and mask the inherent shakiness and any pitch variation by speeding up the result, then layering it with another vocal, sometimes up to four tracks of his own voice, all given varying levels of pitch and speed variation.
What resulted was a very distinct and unique vocal identity that many listeners do not even recognise as Zappa's own distinctive voice. This was one of the most impressive, though least remarked-upon, artistic victories of the Money project.
On the rough acetate, we hear a mix which is noticeably less sped-up than the final master. Also, one can hear the "Don't come in me, in me" refrain which would later be turned backwards for the master at the insistence of MGM.
What's The Ugliest Part Of Your Body was another of Zappa's angriest lyrical attacks on the American straight adult world. Musically, it was a twisted R&B ballad variation led by the standard piano triplets and some nice guitar work later buried on the final master. It is broken up by a fast, classical-influenced midsection. On the full backing track heard on Lumpy Money, we hear the song's full arrangement, where the tape is gradually sped up until the song's chaotic collapse.
For the Money album, the song was split into two parts, the main section appearing on the first side, a reprise of the man theme appearing on the second. This was in place from an early stage, as rough mixes of both parts of this conception, with sped-up lead vocals and a fine Mothers backup choir, as well as the small part of the midsection and concluding musical movement cut for the final master, appear on the Money acetate.
The Idiot Bastard Son, one of Zappa's finest songs, written about his old friend Kenny Williams, was one of the great products of the Money sessions. A snippet of tomfoolery during the vocal session for the song was included on Lumpy Money, under the title Idiot Bastard Snoop. Also heard on that collection is the backing track for the song, where many layered elements of instrumentation buried in the final master can be heard. There is acoustic guitar, slowed-down military drums, Bunk Gardner's beautiful woodwinds work, a surprising usage of sitar, an undertow of fuzz-guitar and an overall sense of grandeur.
The rough acetate mix of Son features a Zappa vocal much less reliant on varispeed effects (check out the falsetto on the bridge!), and a greater amount of sitar compared to the final master, as well as a total lack of spoken-word cut-ins.
Besides Hendrix, Zappa was able to lure yet another guitar hero into taking part in the Money project. This was Eric Clapton, who Zappa recorded undertaking a few spoken-word pieces, two of which would be heard at key points in the Money album. One unused comic snippet, dubbed "The World Will Be A Far Happier Place", was released on The Lumpy Money Project.
The final form of Lonely Little Girl, now given a nearly acid-blues slant with the heavy usage of fuzz guitar, appears in first-movement backing-track form on Lumpy Money, showcasing many previously-buried musical elements including concert tympani and acoustic guitar, the latter of which is deftly varispeeded for the finale.
The acetate rough mix of the track has no vocals, suggesting lyrics were a very late addition to the song. This contains the second movement of the song, as well orchestral cut-ins from the Lumpy Gravy session version of the Oh No theme.
The most dead serious work on Money was the utterly chilling critique of the parents of counterculture children being beaten and killed at the hands of the police, Mom And Dad. The beautiful melody of this piece, and the finely-recorded backing track (featurning many layers of intricate guitar work) are well spotlighted on the instrumental mix heard on Lumpy Money.
The acetate rough mix of Mom And Dad is preceded, just as it would be on Money, by the vaudeville-style brief parental comic jab Bow Tie Daddy. The Mom And Dad mix has the main verse vocals, perhaps Zappa's most heartfelt vocal performance, but the long first break section is still in instrumental form.
The next track recorded would be the first "song" heard on the Money album, and just as perfect a scene-setter as Hungry Freaks Daddy and Plastic People had been for the first two Mothers albums.
December 3rd, 2010 05:59 PM
IanWagner Take yr time, Hawaii Andy, it'll be here! Thanks for the words and much thanks for listening and commenting. Rock the Grunion.
December 3rd, 2010 06:00 PM
IanWagner Oh yeah, for those just checking in, new entry at the end of the previous page.
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