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amoshaun
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 Posted September 30th, 2009 03:19 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Question here that really will expose my ignorance, but here we go....
I recently read somewhere about not being scared to using a higher ISO. I have not had good results with trying that trick myself. My question is...if using a high ISO...say any thing above 800 should I be getting grainy photos? They look fine on the camera and on the computer until I zoom them in and then you can see lots of grain/black splotchy spots. I am wondering if I am doing something wrong or if some cameras just do not function well with using a high ISO. ??? Here are photo details....can any of you tell me if or what I am doing wrong?

Canon Rebel XT
apeture: f5.6
ISO: 1600
exposure time: 1/40
no flash

-the picture was taken in the evening and it was getting semi-dusk.
I might try to post it if I can figure out how.

(Edited by amoshaun)

Shaunda

Mommy to Angeline, Nicholas, Joshua, Christopher and Cassandra
   
HappyMusser
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 Posted September 30th, 2009 08:07 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Yes Shaunda, you are seeing correctly. The higher you go w/ your ISO, the grainier your image is going to be. While 800 might be okay reproduced in a 4x6, it will look grainy if you blew it up to a huge enlargement.

High ISO in your camera is the same as buying that type of film. In film, the higher ISO number the film is, the larger the crystals in the film are . The larger crystals are able to pick up more light, hence you can use it in much dimmer situations, but then that is the grain you see in your image. The finer the crystals in the film, the finer the clarity of the image. Somehow it all works the same in digital.

Like I said, It prly won't be too noticeable in a 4x6, but it sure would in a blow-up. I hope it made sense what I just said. I'm relaying it as my husband explains it to me:-)
  
twofus
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 Posted September 30th, 2009 10:48 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
And different cameras handle noise differently. Also, to avoid noise you could open up your aperture, so that you could bring your ISO down. Do you have an external flash?

BTW, a good guide for shutter speed is not to go lower than your focal length. Example: 55mm>shutter speed should be at least 55, and if there are people involved, try to stay at 100 or higher.


   
amoshaun
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 Posted October 1st, 2009 08:35 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
makes sense, ladies. Thanks. But I still ask, why then does my camera even allow for an ISO of 1600 if it is going to produce a noisy/grainy photo? You do not have to go into great length here, but I am wondering if there are methods/tricks to using a higher ISO that I do not know about??

No, Christy, I do not have an external flash but I do want to get one. Any advice on what to get? I did talk to a guy at a local photography shop here in town and he advised me not to spend the money on a Canon flash because my Rebel won't even be able to access all the features on it. Would you agree with that?

I am doing a friends wedding this weekend. Don't ask me who is crazier...her for trusting me or me for trying!!!!??? Anyway....does anyone have a few quick pointers that you would say are "must knows" for doing a wedding? I am planning to do as much as possible outdoors because I have much better results with my camera with outdoor lighting. Sorry. I feel like a real sponge here, trying to get everything I can from y'all!

Shaunda

Mommy to Angeline, Nicholas, Joshua, Christopher and Cassandra
   
ewaldro
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 Posted October 1st, 2009 05:29 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Shaunda, sometimes the trick to getting good high ISO is making sure the photo is exposed well. If you have to lighten the photo, it gets noisier. If I'm shooting in high ISO situations, I try to err on the side of slightly over-exposing.

In general, the more professional the camera, the better it handles high ISO, although that isn't true for every camera. The reason your camera allows for it is that it may be fine for a 4x6 print, as Thelma said. What size are you looking at it on the computer? Some high ISO shots also look great in black and white, while they don't in color. I use a noise reduction plug-in that helps, too.

Mom of two
   
twofus
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 Posted October 2nd, 2009 11:24 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Quote:
amoshaun wrote:
makes sense, ladies. Thanks. But I still ask, why then does my camera even allow for an ISO of 1600 if it is going to produce a noisy/grainy photo? You do not have to go into great length here, but I am wondering if there are methods/tricks to using a higher ISO that I do not know about??


Maybe for the same reason that your camera allows you to take a picture a shutter speed so slow you get motion blur. Works for certain situations. I like the old film look of black and white w/ a little grain.

Quote:
amoshaun wrote:
No, Christy, I do not have an external flash but I do want to get one. Any advice on what to get? I did talk to a guy at a local photography shop here in town and he advised me not to spend the money on a Canon flash because my Rebel won't even be able to access all the features on it. Would you agree with that?


I don't know. I haven't heard that, but not saying it's not true. Did you ask him what features you would want to use that wouldn't be compatible?


   
smilesbymiles
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 Posted October 2nd, 2009 03:59 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Buy the canon in case you ever upgrade your camera body. Back when David shot a Minolta film camera, his flash went bad. He went in to purchase and bought the less expensive one b/c his 5-6 yr old camera body wouldn't be able to use all the features. Wouldn't you know, less then two months later his body started malfunctioning and he bought the brand new one and wished for all the world he'd have gotten the other flash.
On the flip side, less then one year later he decided he was DONE with photography and we now have quite a LOT of dollars worth of camera / lens / flash sitting here that no one uses.
Moral of the story: You never know.

Michelle, mommy to Adam & Liam
   
ewaldro
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 Posted October 2nd, 2009 04:55 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Shaunda, I asked my husband what the salesman was talking about, since he is very much a camera geek (good kind of geeky). He said that Rebels don't allow wireless flash. But in your situation, you would be using it on-camera so it wouldn't make a difference. I would not recommend doing a wedding without having either an external flash or 2.8 or greater aperture lens. Lots of churches have really terrible lighting.

Michelle, have you ever tried selling any of that stuff online? There might be some Sony owners out there who would like the lens or flash, depending what they are. We basically got rid of our SLR film camera at a yard sale, then later saw people asking for them in an online forum we frequent and we could've gotten at least $100 out of it. I guess there are still a few people out there who like film. :-)

Mom of two
   
twofus
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 Posted October 2nd, 2009 05:24 PM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
Quote:
ewaldro wrote:
I would not recommend doing a wedding without having either an external flash or 2.8 or greater aperture lens. Lots of churches have really terrible lighting.


AMEN!!! As well as reception areas.


   
amoshaun
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 Posted October 5th, 2009 08:06 AM   IP           Reply with quote Edit Post Delete post
ewaldro wrote:
Quote:

I would not recommend doing a wedding without having either an external flash or 2.8 or greater aperture lens. Lots of churches have really terrible lighting.



AMEN!!! As well as reception areas.

I couldn't agree with you more! The fact that we did all the pictures outdoors except for the actual ceremony was in my favor big time. I told the bride that I did not expect to get good quality pictures during the ceremony with my gear and that I really just do not have the money to spend on more gear at this point. She still wanted me to do it, so I feel ok with the quality considering the fact that I was very realistic with her about what I could/couldn't do. I think that she will be happy with them, even though I personally would not be. I do not think that I would agree to do another wedding without an external flash though....because, even if the bride and groom are ok with it, I do not want to set my own personal standard that low.

Shaunda

Mommy to Angeline, Nicholas, Joshua, Christopher and Cassandra
   



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