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hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 23rd, 2010 11:52 AM   IP              
Quote:
Nick wrote:
Jerry---you still doin' good?

Hey, Nicky. Am I doin' good? Well, life is a carnival; too frequently, though, it's the kind of carnival where you get hallucinations from eating a spoiled corn dog and end up spending three hours in the House of Mirrors sobbing quietly, begging passers by for help, only to wake up the next day in a mud puddle behind the roller coaster, pantsless. How's wif you?

Everybody knows The Horse, even if you don't think you do. I'm not typically that big into instrumentals (unless they're surf or something), but this groove is undeniable. The song is actually the flip of this '68 single (Love Is All Right), and it's the straight instrumental version of that song. And since Cliff Nobles is a singer, that means he's got nothing to do with this track at all; in fact, it's just MFSB doin' their thing. And although Cliff's vocal doesn't exactly detract from the instro, it's The Horse that got the airplay and led to this 45 selling a million copies in 1968.






   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 23rd, 2010 01:19 PM   IP              


Gave this a listen the other day, figured it sounded good so I'd load it up here. Four years after Autobahn, but still credited with getting "electro" started as a genre. This, the 45, is still the best of many, many mixes, imo, including the slightly longer club version and the execrable Patrick Cowley (sp?) mix that got played out all the time. In '77, by the way, I was only going to see punk bands and wouldn't be caught dead in a disco except out at a summer house on Fire Island that I shared with some co-workers and friends - there, the only bars were makeshift "discos" and they were full of girls drinking and dancing with wild abandon. So I played along! Anyway, back to I Feel Love; it still sounds great, and creating it absolves Giorgio Moroder of all other sins. My copy plays well enough, and so it's worth it to include a .wav download if anyone wants it:
http://www.divshare.com/download/13550742-8bb




   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 23rd, 2010 03:59 PM   IP              


Tommie Young is a gospel singer from Dallas who made a brief appearance on the "deep soul" scene in the early 70s - then went straight back to singing at her local church. Bobby Patterson, who co-owned the Soul Power label and produced Ted Taylor, Chuck Jackson, Fontella Bass, and Albert King (as well as releasing his own records), discovered Tommie and put out her one LP, and several 45s. And this is one of her best, from 1973 - the lady can sing. Plays a little rough, so this is more for getting the general idea than for downloading.



   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 23rd, 2010 05:18 PM   IP              


Nina's great answer to Ray's Hit The Road, Jack. Popular on the Northern and "Popcorn" circuits. 1961.



   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted December 23rd, 2010 07:31 PM   IP              
All those are great, but the last one is crazed. Produced by Stu Phillips, but of course.
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 24th, 2010 07:29 AM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
Produced by Stu Phillips, but of course.


Yep, and besides everything else he was doing, Colpix was his baby.



I had this record lying around for years, and finally did something about it. On the plain white sleeve someone had written "Northern, skips". Trini Lopez as Northern Soul? When I spun it, I agreed - it's got the beat, and it skipped. In fact, it's got just about the nastiest "feelable" scratch all the way across the record, check it out:


So I glued it, which means applying Elmer's Wood Carpenter in a thick coating, spreading it on evenly with a business card, and then letting it dry for a day. It peels off in one piece that almost looks like it could be played itself. The chemical compound of the wood glue does something magical to vinyl, it has some weird healing powers. Anyway, skip was gone, I played it for a while and then sold it on Ebay - got 57 bucks for it, which is about half what a clean copy would be worth, but I'm not complaining. Plays with "pops" towards the middle and ending, but still not bad.



   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 24th, 2010 05:24 PM   IP              


An incredible jump blues number by saxophonist Jimmy Coe, circa 1953.





   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted December 24th, 2010 05:28 PM   IP              
Quote:
hrtshpdbox wrote:

I had this record lying around for years, and finally did something about it. On the plain white sleeve someone had written "Northern, skips". Trini Lopez as Northern Soul? When I spun it, I agreed - it's got the beat, and it skipped. In fact, it's got just about the nastiest "feelable" scratch all the way across the record, check it out:


So I glued it, which means applying Elmer's Wood Carpenter in a thick coating, spreading it on evenly with a business card, and then letting it dry for a day. It peels off in one piece that almost looks like it could be played itself. The chemical compound of the wood glue does something magical to vinyl, it has some weird healing powers. Anyway, skip was gone, I played it for a while and then sold it on Ebay - got 57 bucks for it, which is about half what a clean copy would be worth, but I'm not complaining. Plays with "pops" towards the middle and ending, but still not bad.






Written by Shel Talmy, interesting! Good record.

   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 25th, 2010 08:41 PM   IP              


Bobby Moore, not to be confused with the New Orleans Bobby Moore who played saxophone for the Rhythm Aces, knocked around the Newark, New Jersey area in the late 50s and early 60s with groups like the Four Most and the Fiestas. 1964's "It Was A Lie" (reissued here by Red Bird in '66) is just flat-out fantastic R&B, impeccable in every respect - and virtually unknown. A favorite of mine.



   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 26th, 2010 03:20 PM   IP              
Could have sworn I'd put up at least one Etta James song in this thread but, unless I"m missing it, apparently not. This Argo record came out in 1963.




   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 30th, 2010 11:58 AM   IP              


Covered by many, here's the '66 original. Syndicate of Sound never had another hit. Point of interest
on the label - Bell, and their subsidiaries, painted the labels right onto the wax, there's no paper
involved (and it's very common for the print to wear away over time, as you can see starting to happen in this case).




   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 30th, 2010 12:31 PM   IP              


I've always like the Guess Who song, and Jr Walker apparently saw just what a good showcase piece it would be for him. Sweet stuff.



   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 31st, 2010 11:58 AM   IP              
Plays pretty clean, mono.







   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 31st, 2010 12:14 PM   IP              
Tossed out of Television for being lazy and difficult, but infinitely more "punk" than Verlaine, Richard Hell was the man; perfect voice for the genre, good songwriter. By some accounts he started spiking his hair and ripping his clothes before anybody else. Still knockin around, and still underappreciated - "Blank Generation" is one of the best punk LPs and songs. Just realized today that the drummer from the first pre-Television ensemble, the Neon Boys, was a guy named Billy Ficca - and that I knew him when he later drummed for the Waitresses (kind weird, since he seemed way too douchey to be hangin' with that crowd).











   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 31st, 2010 08:02 PM   IP              
Non-album versions of Blank Generation and Another World were released in '76, a year before the LP came out, on this U.K. Stiff 45. They're both a little less "polished" than the LP versions, but still great. On the flip of the sleeve, in the middle, you can see that it's a "limited edition" printing of 5,000 copies, and this one is # 3270. 5,000 is really not all that "limited", quite a few of the 45s I've put up here had runs of 500 or less, but it's still pretty uncommon (it's worth maybe 40 or 50 dollars, compared to the numbered press of 1,000 Nirvana "Love Buzz" 45s that bring in $2,000 + these days). With U.K. singles, if someone has popped out that center section to play it with a U.S. 45 adapter, the value drops quite a bit.











   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted December 31st, 2010 08:26 PM   IP              
Patti's first single, or damn close to it; I'm not sure if the live My Generation ever made an album - probably not. Dig Arista's warning about offensive language on the sleeve's flip. I recorded these last eight songs (from the Doors on) as wav files as well, and here's the flac link for them:
EDIT: LInk fixed Jan 03:
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=9O202KCF










(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted January 5th, 2011 12:45 PM   IP              
Jerry--I'm good, but sounds like the circus stunk for you! Sorry to hear that, but glad to see you back. And you brought good stuff--thanks! I actually got some LPs and 78s for free from my grandfather over the holiday, I'l post some pics. Sadly, I still don't have a record player but I thought these would be worth holding on to for when I do get one.
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted January 5th, 2011 07:14 PM   IP              
Quote:
Nick wrote:
Sadly, I still don't have a record player ...


I could send you a working turntable for the cost of postage but it wouldn't have 78 speed on it - sounds like you'll definitely want to check out those.

Recorded in mid '62, shown to the Tornadoes at the end of that year, but finally released in '64. Both sides produced by Zappa, and recorded at the same PAL studio where Memories Of El Monte (way upthread) was recorded. Heavies is sampled in Nasal Retentive Calliope Music from We're Only In It For The Money, and it's the only bit of music on the album not written by Zappa (both sides of this 45 written by Zappa collaborators Dave Aerni and Paul Buff).














(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted January 7th, 2011 03:47 PM   IP              
That's very nice of you to offer Jerry! But yeah, I want one that will handle 78s. It's also a matter of space--I had a player before I moved last (and two moves before that a broken stand-up victrola that my garandfather had shipped up from Texas!) but I had to leave it behind. Someday...
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted January 7th, 2011 04:34 PM   IP              
VERY cool Zappa rip.
   
MoogDroog
Michael Bolton's mullet

Posts: 8501
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted February 23rd, 2011 06:38 AM   IP              
Quote:
hrtshpdbox wrote:


Tommie Young is a gospel singer from Dallas who made a brief appearance on the "deep soul" scene in the early 70s - then went straight back to singing at her local church. Bobby Patterson, who co-owned the Soul Power label and produced Ted Taylor, Chuck Jackson, Fontella Bass, and Albert King (as well as releasing his own records), discovered Tommie and put out her one LP, and several 45s. And this is one of her best, from 1973 - the lady can sing. Plays a little rough, so this is more for getting the general idea than for downloading.




I got the "general idea" of this one, alright! Seems to go on longer than it should, but in a good way.

Laid-up at my gf's with a bad back so these Divshare links are a blessing to me, and this stuff still hits hard, even through laptop speakers.

"The other thing is that the quality of the mp3's I listen to varies especially as some of the music from the likes of Led Zeppelin is old, even with re-mastering still isnt up to the quality of the likes of Def Leppard."
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted February 25th, 2011 10:53 AM   IP              
Quote:
MoogDroog wrote:
Laid-up at my gf's with a bad back ...

Wow, hope you feel better, Tom, I can only imagine; my sole experience with back problems came from a freaky sciatic nerve attack a few years ago that made it extremely painful to even, say, stand up from a sitting position. Glad that you're digging the needledrops, though, and that the links are still working (most of 'em, anyway).
____________________________

It's interesting to look at how Tommy Navarro's "I Cried My Life Away" became a Northern Soul standard; it provides a good example for understanding that old "What makes this Northern, anyway?" thing that you hear. In general, although most of the music played in their clubs is American, the British own the term, it's theirs to decide - if the Northern crowd will dance to it, then it's Northern. But just as Brit DJs came to the U.S. in the 70s and 80s to record-dig in hopes of finding good and previously unheralded soul, so can any record hunter listen to an obscure find and say "Hey, this sounds Northern to me". In the 60s and 70s, so many limited-issue records became standards on the British dance floor that it was almost assumed that everything good had been found; when Stafford's Top Of The World club got going in the mid-80's, it was already 20 years since Manchester's Twisted Wheel had begun their all-nighters, and Lancashire's Wigan Casino had been closed for several years. Nevertheless, the DJs at Stafford had the universal urge to distinguish themselves by uncovering gems, and the list of "Stafford Classics" turns out to be just as long and commendable as anything from the previous eras. It's unquestionable that records that earn the Northern label can be widely diverse; youtube the Dynatone's "Fife Piper" to hear an odd yet beloved track that admittedly stretches the envelope on definition - it's not really soul, though it does have a beat. But the Latin influence, or rather the influence from some Latin songs, had always been part of the Northern scene; the Trini Lopez I posted above, for instance, and also tracks by Cal Tjader, Ray Barretto, Bobby Valentin, and Tony Middleton. I can't tell you when Tommy Navarro's song was recorded (I'd guess around '63 or '64), but I doubt very much that anyone had ever noticed the record until 1984, when it saw its debut at Stafford. And it was a "cover-up", with its label concealed with a paste-over of white paper so that no one could see who the artist was (the better for the DJ to make sure only he got to play it, while also perhaps hoping to dig up some further copies). The record was introduced as "Cry, Cry Every Night" by "Tony Gallo & The Showmen". Needless to say, the club-goers loved it - it's a bossa nova, but there's back-up singers, there's horns. And it's a great song, which helps rather immensely. I really have no bio info on Tommy Navarro, not even a picture, but I can tell you that Doug Morris, who wrote the song, also wrote "Sweet Talkin' Guy" for the Chiffons in 1966. Long Island's De Jac Records didn't press many copies of the record, at the most 1000 copies, though perhaps just 250 or 500; consequently, even lesser-grade copies (like mine, unfortunately) are worth a few bucks. It was repro'ed in England in the 80s, with an exact label reproduction but with the tri-center middle (which some enterprising collectors try to saw off in such a way that the three tell-tale center-hole depressions aren't apparent - the deadwax inscription, of course, still wouldn't match the original's).





(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted March 16th, 2011 12:17 PM   IP              


Arlester Christian, the godfather of funk? Well, sure, definitely. At least partially, and here's why. Because Dyke (Christian was given the nickname as a toddler) wrote and sang the very funky "Funky Broadway", the first hit with "funk" in the title (some radio stations wouldn't play it, as the word "funk" had mostly unpleasant connotations up to that point). Because that song, as covered by Wilson Pickett (the Blazers version is much funkier), became a #1 hit that James Brown readily admitted was an influence; After releasing "Cold Sweat" (erroneously credited by some as the "first funk song", but it followed "Funky Broadway" by several months), Brown said of Dyke and Pickett, "before I'd let them get ahead of me, I'd make them break out in a cold sweat". Because Rick James, after seeing Dyke perform in his hometown of Buffalo, NY, said of "Funky Broadway", "the world was stunned. It was revolutionary as far as what the music was saying, revolutionary as far as its sound,"

I've got copies of these around, but you probably know them already, so for reference sakes just check out James Brown's last single before Dyke's "Funky Broadway","Papa's Got a Brand New Bag". Then listen to"Funky Broadway", then to "Cold Sweat". As someone above my station in musical knowledge notes, on one of those youtube links, the difference in those two JB songs is that "Brown went from using one drummer and Fender guitars to Dyke's style of two drummers and Gibson Es 335"s". But then, Brown was just returning the compliment, as Dyke had certainly been greatly influenced by Brown as well. So, then, Dyke Christian....

...born in '43 on the rough side of Buffalo, NY, got his start in '60 playing bass in clubs with "Carl LaRue and his Crew", who recorded one single locally. The band, after getting a call from DJ Eddie O'Jay, went out to Phoenix, AZ to back the O'Jays on tour (the O'Jays had named themselves in tribute to Eddie O'Jay, who was a Cleveland DJ when they started out in Ohio). Carl LaRue and his crew subsequently got stranded in Phoenix when there was no money to send them back home, so they started playing Arizona clubs, with LaRue going back to Buffalo and Dyke taking over at the microphone. It took about ten months for the band to really refine "Funky Broadway", and by the time a talent scout heard them playing it in a bar and rushed them into the studio, it was mid-1966; 250 copies were pressed, on the "Artco" label, and they're worth a few hundred dollars when they show up. The song was picked up by Art Laboe's Original Sound (for whom Dyke and the Blazers would record seven 45s, and they all charted), and it reached #17 on the soul charts, but that's a bit misleading as it was a "rolling release" that charted successively in different soul markets around the country.

Most of Dyke's songs were expansions on "Broadway", but you can't do funk all the time, and Dyke gives more evidence of his talents and influence on this 1970 b-side that I present to you today, the last record he would record. When listening to the vocal stylings here, bear in mind that this is a full year before Al Green's break-out single, "Let's Stay Together". Pretty uncanny, I'd say. A few months after this record's release, Dyke was shot and killed outside a Phoenix bar, apparently after confronting a drug dealer about a dispute. Dyke was, of course, 27 years old. The odd thing, though, is that the police said Dyke exhibited "old and inactive scars along the veins in both arms", and there was no narcotics and alcohol in his system. He'd cleaned up; indeed, he'd just worked out a deal for Barry White to produce him, and he was planning a European tour. If he'd made it over the 27-hump and was around today, he'd probably be saying that he essentially coined the genre "funk", that he was there first to name it, and play it - and he'd probably be right.



   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted April 4th, 2011 04:02 PM   IP              
I'm doing these in wav as well, and will link to a flac when I have 20 songs or so, starting at this point.
______________________________



Harvey Fuqua, who founded the Moonglows in the 50s, who distributed the first Motown hit, Barrett Strong's "Money", who introduced Marvin Gaye to his sister-in-law, Anna Gordy, who also brought Tammi Terrell to the label and suggested she try some duets with Marvin, and who recorded this great track on his own label, Tri-Phi, in 1962.








Who's Mamie Galore? In the song she tell you, "I'm a Special Agent, baby, name of Mamie Galore". Besides that, she was Mamie Davis from Mississippi, who broke out of the Ike & Tina Turner Revue to record a few singles - and then wound up back in Mississippi, where she continued performing live for years.






This guy has done some living. James McEachin, who wrote this song, born in 1930, earned a Silver Star and Purple Heart in the Korean War, then founded Mack IV records and managed (and performed with?) several bands (pretty soon, I'll put up another, earlier song of his on the label, with a doo wop group named the Lions). Then, despite being a pretty big mover and shaker in the R&B world, he quit the biz (oh, yeah, he went by "Jimmy Mack", like it says on this label for the production credit, and when Martha & the Vandellas wonder "Jimmy Mack, when are you coming back?", some say they're talking about McEachin, though there's controversy on that point). Post-music, he went into acting, becoming a regular on "Perry Mason" and even starring in a short-lived cop show in the early 70s named "Tenafly". After the acting gigs died down, he became a best-selling and highly lauded novelist. These days he works as an advocate for soldiers' issues. And I'm just listening to his songs, but that's cool too. One last thing - there's a $1,000+ Northern Soul record done by a Jimmy Mack, on Palmer records (and the singing is exceptional), and nobody's sure if it's this guy or not!






Willie Mitchell, who ran Hi Records, seems almost as an afterthought to be riffing offa the Stone's "Satisfaction" on this stomping 1965 single.

Photobucket


(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
MoogDroog
Michael Bolton's mullet

Posts: 8501
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 5th, 2011 07:16 AM   IP              
Quote:
hrtshpdbox wrote:
I'm doing these in wav as well, and will link to a flac when I have 20 songs or so, starting at this point.
______________________________



Fantastic news - i'll check these later tonight, thanks!

"The other thing is that the quality of the mp3's I listen to varies especially as some of the music from the likes of Led Zeppelin is old, even with re-mastering still isnt up to the quality of the likes of Def Leppard."
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted April 5th, 2011 08:40 AM   IP              
Fawns, 60s, Philly. Ramsey Lewis, 1968, nice instro that gets played in clubs (it even appears at #155 on Kev Roberts "Top 500 Northern" list). Bobby Taylor, 1971, post-Vancouvers, sweet track; usually it's a cinch that any time you see a Sunflower 45 it's a record by Daddy Dewdrop. Charmettes, 1963, we heard a different record by them upthread; this is the better of the two. Patti Austin, 1971, all the elements are here. Cozy Cole, 1963; like the Ramsey Lewis track, jazz that people find a way to dance to. Odds & Ends, should be around '71-'72, arranged by Thom Bell - listen to this one a few times and it'll worm right in.























(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 508
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted April 7th, 2011 10:55 AM   IP              


Ted Taylor was a member of the Cadets in the 50s (under his real name, Austin Taylor), Here he is in 1973, channeling the Stylistics.








Arthur Adams, now 68 and going strong, is a blues guitarist, singer and songwriter who has worked with everybody - Nina Simone, Gene Allison, B.B. King, Chuck Berry, Lightnin' Hopkins. In the 70s he took a break from the blues and went through a soul phase, which can't be a bad thing.







Timi Yuro, '61, her debut year; where "Hurt" a few months before had risen to #4 on the charts, "She Really Loves You" got only as high as #93. Very nice track, regardless.







Joe Stubbs, brother of Four Tops singer Levi Stubbs, came out of the incredibly talent-rich Falcons ("You're So Fine" upthread). Post-Falcons (and, then, pre-Contours, where Stubbs would replace founder Billy Gordon) he did a couple of singles for Detroit's Lu-Pine label. This is the b-side of a '62 record, love it a lot but wish they hadn't used a fade-out.


   
MoogDroog
Michael Bolton's mullet

Posts: 8501
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 7th, 2011 07:11 PM   IP              
I'd only ever heard Funky Broadway mentioned in other songs, not heard the original. Cheers for the link to that

The Dyke song you posted, I'm So Alone, is reeaally nice. I love the slow-build of it. I can see why you referenced Al Green - his vocals on this are like a more desperate, less contented precursor to Al's 70s stuff. There's certainly a rawness, in with the smooth

"The other thing is that the quality of the mp3's I listen to varies especially as some of the music from the likes of Led Zeppelin is old, even with re-mastering still isnt up to the quality of the likes of Def Leppard."
   
MoogDroog
Michael Bolton's mullet

Posts: 8501
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 7th, 2011 07:30 PM   IP              
Hey, i really like that Willie Mitchell tune that uses the Satisfaction riff - wonder if Otis Redding heard that before doing his version? That riff works great with horns

Harvey Fuqua crops up in the Etta James autobiog a few times (re-reading it at the moment - hell of a story) so it was cool to hear something from him. Have any Moonglows records passed through the Jerry household?

I love anything that uses anything resembling the Peter Gunn riff so that Mamie track was a lot of fun

"The other thing is that the quality of the mp3's I listen to varies especially as some of the music from the likes of Led Zeppelin is old, even with re-mastering still isnt up to the quality of the likes of Def Leppard."
   
MoogDroog
Michael Bolton's mullet

Posts: 8501
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 7th, 2011 07:44 PM   IP              
Yes! Another version of Wade In The Water! Cracking tune, works surpsisingly well as an instrumental given that the main thing i like about Marlena Shaw's version is the relentless vocal


"The other thing is that the quality of the mp3's I listen to varies especially as some of the music from the likes of Led Zeppelin is old, even with re-mastering still isnt up to the quality of the likes of Def Leppard."
   



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