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hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted April 22nd, 2010 07:11 AM   IP              
The animated HBO show "The Life and Times of Tim" has it's moments - some episodes are hilarious, others spotty. If you've seen it, you know the intro song, I got a kick out of discovering that I have the record.



   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted April 22nd, 2010 10:26 AM   IP              
"Robinhood", that's one I'd normally flip right past if looking at a stack of 45's. Would be a mistake, though - two really nice soul sides.





   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 22nd, 2010 03:37 PM   IP              
Dunno about no HBO jazz, but that Hank is one of my faves of his (the record of his on the charts at the time of his death!) and that sounded amazing. Thank you!
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted April 22nd, 2010 03:41 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
(the record of his on the charts at the time of his death!)

So he was right!

Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
and that sounded amazing.

Has some scuffs and I didn't even scrub it in the sink first, but it's still got that "tone", huh?
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 22nd, 2010 03:45 PM   IP              
I dunno, there is SOMETHING indefinable, some haunting quality, in Hank's voice that I haven't heard any other place than from your 78s. Something lost on every LP/CD from him that I've heard. It is so affecting I can't take too much of it at once, know what I mean?
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted April 22nd, 2010 04:00 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
I dunno, there is SOMETHING indefinable, some haunting quality, in Hank's voice that I haven't heard any other place than from your 78s. Something lost on every LP/CD from him that I've heard. It is so affecting I can't take too much of it at once, know what I mean?


MGM pressed some of the best 78s, period, and you know all about the dynamics from the faster spins and wider grooves. But I know what you mean, it's always a "Holy shit, I forgot about this!" all over again when you put one on and Hank makes your hair stand on end; his voice is so "in the room" that you feel like if you crank the volume he'll be spitting on you a little while he sings. Almost creepy, but good creepy!
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 22nd, 2010 04:12 PM   IP              
Absolutely right. What astounds me though is that that feeling communicates even through the needledrops. That makes me really suspicious of the methods of "reproduction" used when transferring recordings from that early era.
   
Jeff Mason
The Nitrate Bandit

Posts: 20814
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 22nd, 2010 04:19 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
I dunno, there is SOMETHING indefinable, some haunting quality, in Hank's voice that I haven't heard any other place than from your 78s.


I am still recovering from "Your Cheatin' Heart".
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted April 29th, 2010 08:50 PM   IP              


In 1987 Mattel issued "California Dream Barbie" and included a 5" blue flexi-disc with a song called "Living Doll". Labeled as the Beach Boys, but purely and solely Brian, it's a rewrite of the Wilson/Usher song "Christine". Notice how Landy and Landy's girlfriend get co-writing credits here. When asked in an interview why he did something so commercial, Brian said "because it might add some happiness to a little kid's life."


   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 29th, 2010 08:52 PM   IP              
Awesome. I love that track, actually.
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted April 30th, 2010 09:32 PM   IP              
Found this one among a stack today. Tough find, but not super-valuable (though it should be or could be, I think). Sherman Nesbary was a Chicago singer/songwriter who recorded under several names, including Verble Domino and Little Sherman & The Mod Swingers. He also wrote the second (and final) a-side that the nascent Jackson Five recorded for Steeltown in 1968, "We Don't Have To Be Over 21". This Little Sherman 45 was cut in '69. No pics of Sherman out there, not that I can find anyway.



(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted May 9th, 2010 01:37 AM   IP              
Just got a thick stack of 45s in trade for some albums. They're all Canadian pressings, and minty; guy I got them from scored them from a widow who hadn't touched them in 20 years. Canadian 45s are typically good quality, though collectors generally prefer American and British releases. I'm definitely diggin' on the labels and sleeves as I wade through them. Here's just a few, some common and some not so.




Not a Motown label you see too often.



Both sides of Bobby Fuller...oh, yeah.






Goofy stuff, but always loved it.



Stuck on goofy, and it doesn't get any more so than this - another one I'm a sucker for.




These guys were great and from, say...'67. AKA "The Five Empressions". Both sides here, I love the flip.






Pretty sure that Grapefruit was a Canadian band.



The star of this lot is the little batch of Beetles 45s; Canadian Capitol swirls and Canadian Apples, all in outstanding shape. Here's a pic of them:


I guess now we're all getting "used to" the remasters, and I do believe they're pretty awesome. But my Beetles listening experience totally flip-flopped about ten years ago - prior to that, anytime I heard a song of theirs played, it sounded the way I expected it to; since then, nothing sounds "normal" anymore. The turning point probably started when I bought my son a CD of Magical Mystery Tour and couldn't believe the weird phasing going on. But the disconnect is all-encompassing now, it extends even to the stuff I grew up on; there's probably no reason that an original Capitol "Baby You're A Rich Man" should sound odd to me, but everything about it sounds a little...different.


   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted May 10th, 2010 09:15 AM   IP              
In 1970 The Turtles were working on an album, Shell Shock, that might have turned out to be their best LP yet. Unfortunately, White Whale didn't care much for quality, they just wanted hits. Reluctantly, Kaylan and Volman agreed to White Whale's request to record, with some Memphis studio musicians, a pop song called "Who Would Ever Think That I Would Marry Margaret", and have it released as a single. Despite the typically great vocal delivery, it's a really awful pop song, and I include it here for two reasons - to get to the b-side, and to display what probaby was, more than anything else, the death knell of the band (they figured that if White Whale wanted this kind of crap, then just screw the whole thing). The Turtles "disowned" this song immediately (the single didn't chart ). The b-side is an entirely different thing, one of their best songs (and this one would have been on Shell Shock). Serviceable anti-Vietnam protest lyrics, but in terms of vocals and arrangement - just fantastic. Both of these songs showed up as "bonus tracks" on the 80's CD release of the Turtles final, and posthumous, '70 album of b-sides, "Wooden Head"; I'm pretty sure that the songwriting credit to "Who Would Ever Think" is credited to Kaylan and Volman on the CD, which I'm sure pisses them off no end. So...a-side - rank display of how a record company can humiliate their artists, b-side - a truly great Turtles song.






   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted May 11th, 2010 10:53 AM   IP              
Had to do new needledrops on these three, which I found weren't in my divshare base - I've had two computers go bust on me in the last couple of years, and must have had these songs on mediafire instead of divshare (for some reason, mediafire files don't successfully make the trip back to my hard drive and then out to divshare). So, anyway, if you've seen these before it's because they've been posted previously, though not for a while. Next up - doo wop.

Cix Bits is one obscure little outfit, they have another single (like, Haze 005 instead of my Haze 003) that is big on the soul circuit. This one is bluesy, gritty funk, and the clip is both sides (parts 1 and 2).



Some of the greatest garage ever was pressed on Dave Kalmbach's Fenton label, out of Sparta, Michigan. Kalmbach would often let the artists come up with their own label name, as was done here (list of Fenton 45s here, though I doubt it's completely comprehensive). Classic garage cut.





One of my favorite records. Terry Pilittere had been in a Rochester, NY band called Wee Four, there was one or two singles released (also on Nu Sound). After they split, and just before Terry was drafted into Vietnam, he cut this single. He was seventeen. He never recorded again after returning home from the war, no info on why, strictly a fill-in-the-blanks thing. Nu Sounds was part of Fine Records, and the story of how an Australian excavated it's remains is downright fascinating. Anyway, the song - "youthful", yes, but there's a seductive melancholy that transcends age or experience.





(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted May 13th, 2010 02:43 PM   IP              
The earliest forms of doo wop can be found in the vocal harmonies of late '30s and early 40s Ink Spots 78s. The style, developed and practiced on urban street corners, reached it's peak for African-American groups in the 50s. From the late 50s and up until doo wop "died", in 1964, many Italians got involved as well; like the black groups, the members were usually poor and urban, kids from the Bronx or Philly. Italians, of course, did a lot of singing themselves, mostly in church. The period of 1960 through 1964 found several multi-racial groups, sometimes formed that way from the outset, sometimes white groups that picked up a couple of black members or vice versa.

Many people find doo wop "funny" sounding, too dated for their tastes. I couldn't agree less, I love the "duhhh-duhhhh" baritones, the exaggerated tenors, the harmonies - and it is funny, in a way, the message is usually all-out love and devotion without any pesky subtlety - Zappa, of course, dug this a lot. I'm going through the doo wop boxes now, and that's what I'll be putting up for a good while - maybe kind of alphabetically, maybe not - "common" names all the way to virtually unknown groups. If you like the genre, you'll hear some good songs you haven't heard before; if you absolutely can't stand doo wop, check back in a couple of months, maybe I'll have moved on to Industrial Dance by then.

No big news that you can't believe everything you read on the net. This first single is on Fine - up above you'll see mention of how Terry Pilettere's NuSounds garage single was also cut at the Fine studios in Rochester, NY (linked to in that post). At the site's Fine discography can be found this about the following single:
Quote:
THE FOUR COUNTS - fanny mae / graduation
Fine FI-7M2562 - (picture sleeve) a-side decent 50's style rocker, b-side ballad
unknown quantity ordered, July 2nd, 1956. Vocal Phil Trunzo with the Tomlinson Sisters

We know this is wrong for two reasons, one intuitive and one concrete; intuitively, we can tell that "Graduation" (which is actually the a-side) just doesn't sound like 50's doo wop (and we kind of suspect that a guy named Phil Trunzo might be Italian). Our concrete proof, though, is that we know that Buster Brown didn't write the b-side, "Fanny Mae", until 1959. I'd guess that this record is 1962, maybe I'll let the keeper of the site know. Anyway, when he says "unknown quantity ordered", we can make a pretty good guess that it was either 250 or 500 copies - who knows how many are still walking around? This is an obscure record from an obscure group; just a footnote in doo wop, but all the requisite elements of the genre are present, and I rather like both sides, and here they are.








Slightly less obscure are the Five Discs, a Brooklyn group originally founded in 1954 as the Lovebirds. Originally all-white; this single (1961) probably has the personnel pictured above. The Five Discs recorded for a whole bunch of different labels, always looking to score a break-out that never happened. Like the Four Counts 45, this is a tough piece of wax to run across; two good sides, and I prefer the "b".





   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted May 14th, 2010 12:04 AM   IP              
Two great labels here, Apollo and Savoy. Apollo was a crucial 50's R&B label out of New York City, and had among it's artists The 5 Royales (upthread somewhere), Solomon Burke, The Cellos, Willis Jackson. Savoy got started in New Jersey in the 40's, and was a pioneer in bebop 78s, featuring Charlie Parker, Mingus, Coltrane, Miles...they also recorded blues artists like Nappy Brown and Big Maybelle. Savoy was founded and owned by a guy named Herman Lubinsky and, as per the wiki,

Quote:
African American artists never liked Herman Lubinsky, who they believed grossly underpaid them for their work. Tiny Price, a journalist for the black newspaper The Newark Herald News said of Savoy and Lubinsky.

"There's no doubt everybody hated Herman Lubinsky. If he messed with you, you were messed. At the same time, some of those people — many of them Newark's top singers and musicians — would never have been exposed to records if he didn't do what he did. Except for Lubinsky, all the hot little numbers, like Buddy Johnson's 'Cherry' would have been lost. The man may have been hated, but he saved a lot of our history — for us and for future generations."


So Lubinsky was sort of a white forerunner to Berry Gordy, I guess.

There's really no photos of these artists to be found, and scarce bio information (as with many of the older groups, even the personnel is unknown and/or disputed). These two singles were both cut in 1955, and both feature some great singing. I posted the a-side of the Carnations single earlier in the thread, this b-side is great too. Four great sides (if nothing else, give a listen to the Carnations "Night Time is the Right Time").












(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted May 15th, 2010 09:47 AM   IP              


If you're looking for youth, you're looking for longevity, just take a dose of rock 'n' roll—it keeps you going. Just like the caffeine in your coffee, rock 'n' roll is good for the soul, for the well being, for the psyche, for your everything. I love it. I can't even picture being without rock 'n'roll. — Hank Ballard

Annie, please don't cheat. Give me all my meat. Let's get it while the getting is good.
- "Work With Me Annie"

The Midnighters are, loosely, called "doo wop" because of the harmonies and the era they were in. Indeed, even though they actually do sing "doo wop doo wop" in a few of their songs (and, don't forget, the term "doo wop" to describe the genre would only come along later as an afterthought), they're really more of a straight-up R&B or even proto-rock group. Anyway, who cares about labels - Hank Ballard is one of the trailblazers of modern music, and that's all that's important. "Work With Me Annie" (below) and it's two "answer songs", "Annie Had A Baby" (also below) and "Annie's Aunt Fanny" (damn, don't seem to have that one) were all banned by the FCC for suggestive lyrics. Didn't matter, "Work With Me" was #1 on the R&B charts, and got good mainstream exposure as well - all three singles sold more than a million copies despite the ban. The song was "covered" by Georgia Gibbs as "Dance With Me Henry" and by Etta James as "Roll With Me Henry", with extensive lyric changes, so that white radio stations had something they could play.

Hank Ballard worked with the Midnighters, then later as a solo act, for Federal, which became King. He'd work with label-mate James Brown also, and really kept at it right up through the 90's (he passed away in 2003). The flip of Ballard's 1958 single "Teardrops on Your Letter" was "The Twist", which Ballard wrote, and which Dick Clark liked so much that he convinced one Ernest Evans (aka Chubby Checker) to re-record, which turned out to be a pretty good idea. Hank was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990, I've got a bunch of Midnighters and Hank Ballard singles, but here I've put up the a-sides of five early 45s, all from 1954 and 1955.






















(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted May 16th, 2010 08:32 AM   IP              


Formed in 1948, originally as the Vibra-Naires, this Baltimore group changed their name to honor their state bird - they started the trend of "bird names" for doo wop groups (Cardinals, Crows, Flamingos, Larks, Penguins, Wrens, Ravens). Credited as the first vocal group in the R&B genre. Their first hit, "It's Too Soon To Know", penned by their manager Deborah Chessler, sold 30,000 copies in it's first week, placing it at #1 on the R&B charts, and reached #13 on the pop charts, being one of the first black singles to "cross over" - the song was covered by Ella Fitzgerald and Dinah Washington, among others. I don't have "It's Too Soon To Know", but Val Shively told me an interesting story of how the song came about. Chessler, an aspiring but unpublished songwriter, had written a poem about a Russian man she'd met who'd proposed; she felt she hadn't known him long enough, and wrote the poem as a response to his proposal. Told by a friend that the poem could be a song, she wondered how it would sound put to music. The friend knew the Orioles, got them the lyrics, they arranged it, and sang it to Chessler over the telephone. She was floored, and the relationship began.

Sonny Til was a Sinatra-level hearthrob, with girls fainting and crying at concerts. From 1948 to 1954 the Orioles cut over 100 45s, for both Jubilee and Natural. Besides the Orioles, Jubilee cut records for Harry Belafonte, Brownie McGhee, the Five Sharps, Billy Ward and the Dominoes and, towards the end of their run as a label, Mary Wells. "Crying In The Chapel" turned out to be their biggest hit; here's that a couple of other songs appropriate for a Sunday, all released in '53 and '54.







   
hrtshpdbox
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Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted May 17th, 2010 08:25 AM   IP              
There's very little information on the net about The Legends, except for on a site put together by long-time doo wop historian Marv Goldberg. His entry on the group is pretty interesting (I think so, anyway) and so, instead of paraphrasing it, I'll just give it to you straight:
Quote:

The Legends were one of the hundreds of New York City groups that were competing for a hit record in the heyday of the Rock 'n Roll era. The high tenor lead that they employed was a direct reaction to the success of Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers.

The members of the Legends met in 1955 at Manhattan's Industrial Arts High School. Unlike most groups, which formed in a specific neighborhood, the Legends were from three different boroughs (the large subdivisions of New York). This was because Industrial Arts accepted students from all over the city. Thus, lead tenor Marshall Samples came from Harlem (in upper Manhattan); baritone Ron Warwell, tenor Bobby Weinstein, and pianist Dominick Fleres were from Brooklyn; tenor Richard "Chico" Brunson called the Bronx his home, and so did bass Sampson Reese. They were all 15-16 at the time.

The members met in the school chorus, and practiced in the hallways and bathrooms "annoying all the people," as Ron puts it.

Marshall chose the name "Legends," but Ron doesn't remember why. Deciding to make the New York City Transit Authority rich, they rotated practicing at each others' houses, as well as at school. Their influences were the Flamingos, the Teenagers, Little Anthony, the Harptones, the Turbans, the Heartbeats, and the Willows. They practiced the hits of the day, as well as a lot of original tunes. The guys found it easy to write songs, since they had a habit of talking in harmony. (If one would see a pretty girl, for example, he'd point her out with the beginnings of some lyrics, and the others would take up a background chant.)

The Legends entered the Apollo Theater amateur show one Wednesday night and walked away with the top prize, which was a booking to do some shows. They then repeated that feat a second time, some months later, in 1955.

Around June of 1956, the guys decided the time was right for getting the Legends sound down on wax. They just walked in to Morty Craft's Melba label (at 1674 Broadway) and auditioned for him. (At the time, Melba's big attraction was the Willows, who had just had a tremendous hit with "Church Bells May Ring." It was also the time when Morty Craft was about to buy out his partner, Ray Maxwell, to become the sole owner of Melba.)

Craft was impressed and set up a session, under the direction of saxist and bandleader Cherokee Conyers ("The Little Man With The Big Horn"). The Legends were dismayed when Conyers entirely changed around their arrangements. At the same time, they picked up a manager, Norman Marsalis, whose sister Marshall was dating.

Their only Melba session produced two songs, both led by the high falsetto of Marshall Samples. The ballad side was "The Eyes Of An Angel" and the up-tempo flip was "I'll Never Fall In Love Again." Both songs were very short, with the former a shade over two minutes and the latter only a minute and three-quarters.

Melba released the record around September 1956, and it doesn't seem to have been reviewed. Its competition was: Lavern Baker's "I Can't Love You Enough," the Teen Queens' "Red Top," the Hearts' "He Drives Me Crazy," the Penguins' Mercury re-cut of "Earth Angel," the Vocaltones' "My Version Of Love," the Pyramids' "Okay Baby," the Keynotes' "Now I Know," Chuck Berry's "Brown-Eyed Handsome Man," the Sophomores' "Linda," the Turbans' "It Was A Night Like This," the Monarchs' "Pretty Little Girl," the Harptones' "Three Wishes," the Platters' "It Isn't Right," the Dells' "Oh What A Night," the Chestnuts' "Forever I Vow," the Teenagers' "The ABC's Of Love," the Clovers' "From The Bottom Of My Heart," and the Jayhawks' "Love Train."

The Legends played the Empire Theater in Brooklyn, backed by Cherokee and His Band, as well as some shows with WWRL's Tommy "Dr. Jive" Smalls and WOV's Jack Walker, "The Pear-Shaped Talker." Most of their appearances, however, were at house parties (on some occasions they ended up getting chased out of the neighborhoods by groups that weren't appreciative of them coming there and impressing their girls). Around 1956, they did a show with the Platters and Little Anthony.

Eventually, their relationship with both Morty Craft and Norman Marsalis soured. Craft told them that there was no royalty money due them, but then they got a call from some girls in their fan club, who told them that the record was a big hit in Connecticut. They got mad at Marsalis because he didn't even know they had a fan club! The result of the confrontation was that Ron got into a fist fight with Marsalis, and when the dust had settled, they had no more manager. After this, they managed themselves.

In late 56, the Legends were fooling around with an arrangement of Harry Belafonte's calypso song "Day-O." They made a demo, which found its way to Glory Records. Next thing they knew, the Tarriers had appropriated their arrangement, and released it as "The Banana Boat Song." (While Belafonte's version of the song hit the charts after the Tarriers', it was something he'd been singing long before he recorded it.)

In late 1957, they had another go at recording. This time, they went down the block from Melba, to Hull Records, at 1595 Broadway. Again they walked in cold, and auditioned for Bea Caslon (owner of Hull, along with Billy Dawn Smith and William Henry Miller). Bea signed them on the spot.

At Hull, the Legends recorded another two songs: "The Legend Of Love" was the ballad, and "Now I'm Telling You" upped the tempo. The former was led by Marshall, and the latter by Bobby Weinstein, with Ron Warwell on the bridge. Interestingly, the beginning of "Now I'm Telling You" has a distinct resemblance to parts of Dion & Belmonts' "I Wonder Why"; however, "Now I'm Telling You" was recorded first. While the Legends did their own arranging, once again the session musicians changed most of it around.

The record was released around November 1957 and wasn't reviewed. It went up against the Dells' "Pain In My Heart," Noble (Thin Man) Watts' "Hard Times (The Slop)," the Drifters' "Yodee Yakee," the Bobbettes' "Speedy," the Coasters' "Sweet Georgia Brown," the Valiants' "This Is The Night," Little Joe's "The Echoes Keep Calling Me," Lee Andrews & the Hearts' "Tear Drops," the Superiors' "Don't Say Goodbye," the Jayhawks' "Everyone Should Know," the Ravens' "Lazy Mule," the Solitaires' "Thrill Of Love," the Plants' "Dear I Swear," the Metronomes' "Dear Don," and Sam Cooke's "I'll Come Running Back To You."

The record sold moderately well ("Now I'm Telling You" doing well in Chicago and "The Legend Of Love" selling in New York), and all was seemingly bright. Amazingly, Hull was paying them royalties.

Then they were told that, since they were an integrated group, they'd have a hard time getting better bookings; because of this, Bobby and Dominick eventually dropped out. Bobby was replaced by a guy nicknamed "Tinker," who was a friend of Richard Brunson.

Then Sampson Reese met a girl, started spending more time with her than with the group, and the guys became jealous. This served to break up the Legends (but at least Sampson married her!).

When it was all over, Ron became a jazz drummer, fronting his own band on weekends. He also returned to his art training (which he picked up at Industrial Arts High School) and became an Art Director for several record companies (turning out packaging for albums). Sampson opened an engraving company in Manhattan; he ended up singing Country & Western music. Bobby Weinstein now works at BMI. Marshall cut a solo record entitled "Mama Don't Make Spaghetti Like That."

MELBA
109 The Eyes Of An Angel (MS)/I'll Never Fall In Love Again (MS) - ca. 9/56

HULL
727 The Legend Of Love (MS)/Now I'm Telling You (BW/RW) - late '57


So...'57 - early for an integrated group. 17 and 18 years old when they recorded this single, even younger when they recorded the one for Melba. Just some kids who could sing, and were hoping to make something happen; the mighty hand of fate assured that nothing did, but the record is really good. The stock numbers on the label show that the intended a-side was "Now I'm Telling You" (the side that got some notice in Chicago); based on the label grafitti on the b-side, I'm guessing this copy was owned by a New Yorker. Hull Records, in their lifetime stretching from '55 to '65, also cut records for The Heartbeats, The Avons, The Monotones, Shep and the Limelites. Here's both sides of The Legends, record books for around 100 bucks:







You'd think that there'd be info available about an MGM artist, but no way - all I know is that it's 1955 and out of Philly. And that the Hide-A-Ways, like The Legends, only had one other record, and they're both rare as hell (this one books for 550-650, the other, on Ronni, for 4 to 6 thousand). MGM must have floated a few copies to see if anything happened (pressing was probably about 200 copies). I also know that this is one very sweet doo wop record, really right up there. Oh, meant to mention, couldn't find a picture of either The Legends or the Hide-A-Ways. Enjoy.




   
hrtshpdbox
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Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted May 18th, 2010 05:44 AM   IP              
The Lamplighters were an early-to-mid 50's R&B group from South Central Los Angeles, most notable as being Thurston Harris's first group; Harris would later have a hit with a cover of Bobby Day's "Itty Bitty Pretty One". The Lamplighters would evolve into The Sharps, and the Sharps 45 below also featured Harris; later the Sharps, sans Harris, would evolve into The Rivingtons, of "Papa-Oom-Mow-Mow" fame. These Federal releases are 1954 (Federal stopped using the "silver top" design right after this) and 1955, and the Aladdin single is 1957.












Also in '57, Aladdin released this unusual monologue version of "Glory of Love" by the Velvetones (there were seven groups that recorded as the Velvetones between 1945 and 1967 - this is the one led by a guy named Tommy Hudson). The song, written in 1936 by Billy Hill and a #1 pop hit that year for Benny Goodman, would go on to be revived by The 5 Keys in 1951, and subsequently covered by everyone from Dean Martin to Otis Redding to Bette Midler.






Back to Federal, one of their earliest songs to "cross over" to white audiences was the decidedly risque "Sixty-Minute Man" by the Dominoes; the song was #1 for 14 straight weeks on the R&B charts, and reached #17 on the pop charts. Though the Domonies front man was usually Clyde McPhatter, this song was sung by Bill Brown. Credited to the Dominoes manager, pianist and songwriter Billy Ward, there were many direct inflences for the song, and bragging about sexual prowess in general goes back to19th century minstrel songs, as does the reference to "Dan" (Dan's usually the "back door man"). The song, naturally, was banned by most radio stations, but found it's audience anyway. That this 45 doesn't have the silver top indicates it's a 2d issue, probably pressed around '57.

Quote:
There'll be fifteen minutes of kissin'
Then you'll holler "Please don't stop" (Don't stop!)
There'll be fifteen minutes of teasin'
Fifteen minutes of squeezin'
And fifteen minutes of blowin' my top







(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
hrtshpdbox
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Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted May 20th, 2010 12:08 PM   IP              
These three, if you see them at the Goodwill, definitely grab 'em. This one starts really quietly, you'll want to turn the volume up to hear it properly and savor the subtleties.




Haha, I love that song; OK, back to doo wop. Out of Ohio, pure beauty, not much info on the group, not many copies to be found.



This Madison Brothers is beautiful Philly doo wop, no bio info available. Like Johnny & The Thunderbirds, also an extremely hard record to find - and also a green label (my favorite!).




   
hrtshpdbox
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 Posted May 22nd, 2010 01:37 AM   IP              
A kid in high school, "Prez" Tyus, wrote this song (he wrote the flip, too) about a girl he had a crush on. He gave it to a group of classmates who had a group named D'Italians (yep, that was their name, and a downright odd choice for four black kids). When Checker picked the group up and recorded this 45 in 1958 (after they changed the group's name to The Students), everyone in the group was 16 years-old, and got their homework assignments mailed in from wherever they were on the road. "I'm So Young" didn't do much for Checker, but became a hit a few years later when released on Argo. The Students only recorded one other 45.

Deep Purple is a 1933 song that's been covered by many artists; this Dominoes version was cut in 1957.

Not to belabor the obvious, but Brian Wilson is a common denominator with these two songs.






(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
hrtshpdbox
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 Posted May 23rd, 2010 03:26 PM   IP              
A quick breakaway to soul, though the doo wop component in this song is also undeniable. Patti Drew was a pop singer, and this 1968 song was long ago picked up by the Northern Soul community. And, while Patti's great, the doo wop baritone is what makes it work, the perfect contrast to the lead vocals and the horns. Great track.


   
hrtshpdbox
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 Posted May 27th, 2010 07:32 AM   IP              
I'm not big into LPs, but I had to jump at a chance to pick up this amazing one for a song. The Cadillacs, a Harlem group, had most of their hits on Josie records between 1954 and 1957, then Jubilee picked them up to finally give them an album. There's three versions of this, a blue label (1957), this flat black label (1959), and a glossy black label (1960) - they're all pricey when they're in good shape. "Speedo", I'm reading, was used somewhere in Goodfellas, and though I've seen that film probably 30 times I can't remember precisely where. I love this cover photo.
Zoom

Speedo





   
hrtshpdbox
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 Posted May 29th, 2010 01:19 AM   IP              
The Fabulous Idols lone effort was this 1960 track on New York City's Kenco label; sweet track, too.





Larry Chance grew up in Philly and went to high school with Chubby Checker and Frankie Avalon, but it wasn't until he moved to the Bronx in 1957 that he formed his own group. They were “discovered” singing outside a subway station by the owner of Rome Records, who took them into the studio for some tracks in 1960, including this one. “Life Is But A Dream” was a hit for other groups as well, and the most familiar version might be the Harptones' ballad.




The Mellokings, another New York City group, had a middling hit with Tonite-Tonite (#77), their first release, in 1957, but the song has gone on to be an enduring doo wop standard. Herald pressed about 1,000 copies with the group name as the Mellotones, before they realized there was another group with that name and renamed the group.




Randy & The Rainbows was out of Queens, New York, and recorded this, their only hit, in 1963. Believe it or not, the group is still kickin', and they've toured with just about everyone at some point (including the Beach Boys), and the group last released an album in 2001. This song was, of course, picked up by Blondie.




The Cleftones were also from Queens, and this 45 was cut in 1956. This is the b-side, the a (Why Can't We Be Sweethearts) was used in Goodfellas; I'll get around to that one sometime, I guess, but I like Neki-Hokey – which pre-dates and appears to have absolutely nothing to do with the Cajun song recorded by Bobbie Gentry, Aretha Franklin, P.J. Proby, and others.




There's a few Dynamics out there, this is definitely the group I've pictured, and “Someone” is from 1958. Don't have a lot more to go on that that; good song, though.




The Castaleers were from Providence, Rhode Island, and this 1960 record was Planet's first release. The group did not enjoy any substantial success, but they penned this song, and I think it's terrific.



(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
thefunK
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 Posted May 29th, 2010 09:13 AM   IP              
Just been browsing through this thread and you guys are listening to some seriously good shit. Hell, I am impressed to see the likes of Bobby Garrett, Earl King, Syl Johnson, Marva Whitney, Baby Huey, Magic Sam, Buster Brown, Howard Tate, Esquires.........
Reason for the post is to say that I never knew that Gino Washington recorded on Ric Tic so you are never too old to learn something. He is still going strong, saw him last year in a concert featuring Jimmy James and PP Arnold. JJ is starting to run out of gas but PP was the star of the show and sounds better than ever.
I have Ric Tic Relics Vol 1&2. If anyone is interested I can arrange an upload sometime.
  
hrtshpdbox
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 Posted May 29th, 2010 09:55 AM   IP              
Quote:
thefunK wrote:
Reason for the post is to say that I never knew that Gino Washington recorded on Ric Tic so you are never too old to learn something. He is still going strong, saw him last year in a concert featuring Jimmy James and PP Arnold.


That's Geno, with an "e", the Ram Jam guy. He's from Indiana, Gino's from Detroit. Gino's still alive, but doesn't appear to be active musically any longer.
   
thefunK
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 Posted May 29th, 2010 10:20 AM   IP              
Quote:
hrtshpdbox wrote:That's Geno, with an "e", the Ram Jam guy. He's from Indiana, Gino's from Detroit. Gino's still alive, but doesn't appear to be active musically any longer.


Ah. there's two of them, makes more sense now!*!
  
hrtshpdbox
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 Posted May 29th, 2010 10:40 AM   IP              
Quote:
thefunK wrote:
Ah. there's two of them, makes more sense now!*!


Yeah, some discographies mix their stuff together (they were born just a couple years apart, to muddy it up further). Btw, glad you liked some of the stuff you saw (and the mention of Earl King as well, I was starting to think I was the only person on the planet who digs "Trick Bag" - fine song, tho).
   
thefunK
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 Posted May 29th, 2010 12:20 PM   IP              
You are well informed man.

Regards Earl King he is one of those New Orleans guys who create really listenable music, often with humorous lyrics. I cant say Im a huge fan but I know of him and like what Ive heard.
  



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