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hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 1st, 2010 03:24 PM   IP              
Can't say I know a while lot about the Chanels, except that "The Reason" is the song they're known for, and that it was released in 1958. Torchy stuff, a little unusual but not bad.





Add an "n" to Chanels and you get Channels. A New York group formed in 1955, this is the seond of four 45s they did for Whirlin' Disc, an influential label that nevertheless produced a total of just 10 singles. Whirlin' Disc was just one of the doo wop labels created by producer Bobby Robinson; others included Red Robin, Fury, Fire, and Enjoy. Robinson went on to produce big hits for everyone from Gladys Knight, the Shirelles, Elmore James - right up to Grandmaster Flash, Spoonie Gee, and Kool Moe Dee. Anyway, back to the Channels...good song.



   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 2nd, 2010 11:14 AM   IP              
Three gentle tracks.

Ebonaires, 1959.



Peacock was a terrific Houston label that released R&B and gospel sides from 1950 through 1970. I saw a site on the net that identified this particular 1960 record as the Uniques that Joe Stampley recorded with in the mid-60s; I very much doubt that's the case.




(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 3rd, 2010 01:41 PM   IP              

The Valentines had a big New York following, never had a national hit. Formed in Harlem in 1952, they got their start the same way so many of their contemporaries did - singing on street corners, in subway stations, at parties. This single, despite the "I'm-a-jerk-with-a-black-marker" inscription, was cut in 1957.




Before working at Motown, before co-founding the legendary soul label Shrine, Eddie Singleton cut this track for Brunswick in 1958.





From Kentucky, of all places, the Moonglows are one of the most important vocal groups ever, with a long history of hits (and personnel changes). Signed in 1952 by Alan Freed to his Champagne label, they moved on to Chance and then Chess. This R&B track is from '56.




(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 6th, 2010 06:31 AM   IP              


Formed in Harlem in 1955, and influenced by high school classmates the Crests and the Keynotes, the Cellos received most of their acclaim from this 1957 cut, their first of four singles on Apollo. The first pressing of the record, titled just "Rang Tang Ding Dong", unexpectedly sold out almost overnight; the opening question/answer in the song was immediately popular with New Yorkers. Since Apollo distributors weren't being asked for copies of "Rang Tang Ding Dong" but were being besieged with requests for "The Japanese Sandman" (and, since that title was unavailable as it was the name of a Django Rheinhart record cut in the 1920s), Apollo did a compromise and the song was reissued, as below, with the Japanese Sandman subtitle. Even though both pressings were done in '57, a copy without the subtitle is worth about five times as much as one with it. The song wound up getting quite a bit of national airplay but the Cellos, despite doing Alan Freed tours with the likes of The Coasters and The Five Satins, petered out within just a couple of years. This is a great doo wop record, and how a group this talented (and with a debut hit) didn't go on to more success is just one of those mysteries of management and fate.



   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 8th, 2010 07:23 PM   IP              


Lots more doo wop to go - El Capris, Five Satins, Paragons, Sh-Booms...really a bunch. But taking a break, at least for this record. This is a "house find", noticed it this morning in a stack that I figure I must have been through at least once before. Philips is one of those labels you have to be careful about, all sorts of unremarkable looking stuff that's nevertheless incredible. Had no clue who Kenni Woods was, was blown away when I heard the a-side, blown away to the 10th power when I turned it over and listened to the b. So, reading up on her, discovered that she's Sandi Sheldon, who got her start when Van McCoy moved into the house next door to her in New Jersey. And that she toured as one of the Shirelles; it's pretty cool, read about her here. This is her first effort, 1963; both sides are fine, but "Can't He Take A Hint" (which plays a little less well, naturally and unfortunately) is sublime.






   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 18th, 2010 05:11 AM   IP              


Otis Williams, of the Temptations, was born in 1941. Otis Williams, of the Charms, was born five years earlier, in '36. It always blows my mind how many people think they're the same person - they ain't. Recording solely for Syd Nathan's King subsidiary DeLuxe, the Charms had quite a few hits, but "Hearts of Stone" was their first and their biggest - it was #1 on the R&B charts in 1954, and also reached #15 on the Pop charts. Nathan, who was alert to the L.A. group the Jewels, who actually wrote it, hand-picked the song for the Charms to cover. The original by the Jewels (and I have one of theirs around somewhere) didn't go anywhere, and the Jewels toiled forever in obscurity; on a few occasions the Jewels toured with the Charms, and it was the Charms that got to play "Hearts of Stone" - you know that had to hurt.






The Chords had a big hit with Sh-Boom in 1954, on both the R&B and Pop charts. In 1955 they were sued by an already-existing group of the same name, and ended up changing their name to ... the Sh-Booms. There's no label change here, really - Cat was a subsidiary of Atlantic to start with. Gotta love that Cat label design ("Cat music" was a Southern term for R&B), pity about the label tear on my copy.





The Del-Vikings (sometimes the Dell-Vikings, and sometimes without a hyphen with either spelling) were one of the few integrated 50's groups. Their '57 hit "Come Go With Me" on Pittsburgh's Fee Bee label sold over a million copies; from a collecting standpoint, the copy I have is the sought after one - with the picture of the bee (later they went to plain block letters), and with the horizontal lines all the same thickness (indicating a first press, later presses had two thin and two thick lines). The Del-Vikings lasted less than a year in their original carnation (they re-formed in 1970), putting out four singles for Fee Bee; the break-up was a mess, with members who had signed the Fee Bee contract as minors bolting to Mercury, and other members still bound to Fee Bee (for awhile there were two Dell-Vikings, with neither one actually getting any recording done while competing managers fought over rights). Meanwhile, fledgling label Luniverse bought some accapella demos from Fee Bee, recorded backing tracks, and released them on their own label.






   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 19th, 2010 02:15 AM   IP              
From Chicago, this group had knocked around since the early 50s, finally got a track on wax here in '61. Singer is a guy named Eddie Williams, who was drafted soon after this, rendering the Ideals kaput (there was a different Ideals who did tracks like "Knee Socks" and "Don Juan"). This record's a bit crackly, but I think it's worthy enough to bother.



   
MoogDroog
Michael Bolton's mullet

Posts: 8501
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 20th, 2010 05:31 AM   IP              
I'm a bit behind, so i'm starting at the top of this page.

I like The Reason by The Chanels because it keeps threatening to turn into Unchained Melody.
Stars In The Sky is a bit more like it - more memorable than The Chanels with one 'n'. To be honest though, are there actually bad doo wop songs? If there are, i haven't heard them. It's such an brilliant, exuberant form of music that i'd think even a bad song would be rescued purely by the form.

Ebonaires / Johnny / Uniques threesome is soothing my aching, hungover head. Doo wop may very well become a Sunday morning staple of the Moog household.

"The other thing is that the quality of the mp3's I listen to varies especially as some of the music from the likes of Led Zeppelin is old, even with re-mastering still isnt up to the quality of the likes of Def Leppard."
   
MoogDroog
Michael Bolton's mullet

Posts: 8501
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 20th, 2010 05:32 AM   IP              
* If anyone doesn't know, you can either listen to these by clicking on the Play button, or you can download the mp3 by clicking where it says DivShare. I'd recommend doing that, but set up an account (takes 20 seconds) to avoid a 15 second wait for each download *
"The other thing is that the quality of the mp3's I listen to varies especially as some of the music from the likes of Led Zeppelin is old, even with re-mastering still isnt up to the quality of the likes of Def Leppard."
   
MoogDroog
Michael Bolton's mullet

Posts: 8501
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 20th, 2010 07:35 AM   IP              
Quote:
hrtshpdbox wrote:


Formed in Harlem in 1955, and influenced by high school classmates the Crests and the Keynotes, the Cellos received most of their acclaim from this 1957 cut, their first of four singles on Apollo. The first pressing of the record, titled just "Rang Tang Ding Dong", unexpectedly sold out almost overnight; the opening question/answer in the song was immediately popular with New Yorkers. Since Apollo distributors weren't being asked for copies of "Rang Tang Ding Dong" but were being besieged with requests for "The Japanese Sandman" (and, since that title was unavailable as it was the name of a Django Rheinhart record cut in the 1920s), Apollo did a compromise and the song was reissued, as below, with the Japanese Sandman subtitle. Even though both pressings were done in '57, a copy without the subtitle is worth about five times as much as one with it. The song wound up getting quite a bit of national airplay but the Cellos, despite doing Alan Freed tours with the likes of The Coasters and The Five Satins, petered out within just a couple of years. This is a great doo wop record, and how a group this talented (and with a debut hit) didn't go on to more success is just one of those mysteries of management and fate.







This is a firm favourite so far. It's pretty oddball but it's so good that you couldn't write it off as just a novelty record - what a joy to listen to!

Oh and hey, I've heard one of these already! Sh-Boom under the name of The Chords on a great Atlantic R&B box. Always loved that one. Sounds tons better from your record

"The other thing is that the quality of the mp3's I listen to varies especially as some of the music from the likes of Led Zeppelin is old, even with re-mastering still isnt up to the quality of the likes of Def Leppard."
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 21st, 2010 08:00 AM   IP              
Quote:
MoogDroog wrote:
It's such an brilliant, exuberant form of music that i'd think even a bad song would be rescued purely by the form.


That's exactly the way I feel, I pretty much like it all. One of the interesting things about doo wop is that it's most certainly "dead" - whereas there's nothing odd about a new group releasing some original blues or rockabilly songs, or classically structured R&B or soul songs, it's very unlikely that there will be new doo wop; the genre seems encased in amethyst, strictly for trips down memory lane. Think of how odd this is - at Woodstock, in '68, Sha Na Na was a "nostalgia" band performing songs that were at the top of the charts just seven years before! Here's the much better original of a song Sha Na Na liked to play - came out in '58 but didn't hit the charts until '61:




Imagine a nostalgia act today that plays songs that were popular in 2003. Unlikely, because not that much has changed in culture or music since '03, while the period between '61 and '68 saw the rise of the counterculture, the Beetles, Vietnam, acid, pretty much everything. Doo wop, despite being great and, as you say, exuberant music, already seemed like something from a black-and-white world to '68 ears, and that perception still persists. Anyway, another fun one, from '58:



If somebody told you this was a snippet left off of the Hawthorne album, and wanted to know if you thought it was Carl or Brian, which would you guess?


But it's neither, of course, it's the Shells, from '57.


   
Marion
George Michael's earring

Posts: 12
Registered: Jun 2010
 Posted June 21st, 2010 08:04 AM   IP              
Quote:
MoogDroog wrote:
* If anyone doesn't know, you can either listen to these by clicking on the Play button, or you can download the mp3 by clicking where it says DivShare. I'd recommend doing that, but set up an account (takes 20 seconds) to avoid a 15 second wait for each download *


Thank you! I was one of the ones who did not know this.
   
MoogDroog
Michael Bolton's mullet

Posts: 8501
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 21st, 2010 09:06 AM   IP              
Cool, dig in - this thread is a goldmine!
"The other thing is that the quality of the mp3's I listen to varies especially as some of the music from the likes of Led Zeppelin is old, even with re-mastering still isnt up to the quality of the likes of Def Leppard."
   
artie
has Beach Boy blood in their veins

Posts: 1364
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 21st, 2010 08:24 PM   IP              
Great thread Jerry. Thanks alot, enjoying alot of the stuff now.
"This one...is this one"
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 21st, 2010 10:57 PM   IP              
Thanks, artie, glad you're diggin' it.



Adam Jackson had one helluva tenor. The Jesters formed at their Harlem high school in 1955. Influenced by the Cadillacs, Valentines, Moonglows, whom are all covered a bit upthread. They had several releases on Winley into the early 60s (this one, below, is their second record), and hung together, with a few personnel changes, right up into the late 70s. Although doo wop is definitely a medium suited for 45s (very few of the groups actually got to put out an LP), there's an exception here - "Paragons Meet The Jesters" was a 1959 album of those two New York groups giving it their all. Playing both sides of this one; although "I'm Fallin In Love" was pressed as the b-side, it got more radio play (on the strength of Jackson's lead vocal, I'd say) and became the de facto a-side; label honchos regularly got it wrong when it came to figuring out which side would spark the most interest.






   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 24th, 2010 07:36 AM   IP              
Breaking far afield from old R&B genres for a minute. Was flipping through 45s and noticed this '74 single was produced by David Gilmour. Not a big Floyd fan myself, I was still curious to hear what Gilmour's side projects sounded like, so gave it a spin, then another for Audacity. British folk/rock, with what seems like Poco and Burrito Bros influence; I like the track and I'm a little surprised I hadn't heard of Unicorn before.


   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 26th, 2010 08:57 AM   IP              


Bobby Smith and Henry Fambrough formed the Domingoes in 1954, changed the name of the act to the Spinners in 1961, and never stopped - they performed last month in Louisiana, they have a gig scheduled next month in West Virginia (two others who were there at the outset of the Domingos, Billy Henderson and Pervis Jackson, and who stayed for the long run, passed away over the last few years). At 56 years and running, I'd have to guess that Bobby and Henry's creative partnership is one of the longest-lived ever. The big hits, of course, "Could It Be I'm Falling In Love" and "I'll Be Around" among them, came in the 70's; this is the first Spinners 45 (1961) and also the first 45 on Harvey Fuqua's Tri-Phi label.



   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 26th, 2010 11:19 AM   IP              
Marvin Gaye plays drums on that, and it was later used on the first Motown Spinners LP, as well as one of the A Collection Of 16 Motown Hits albums. The cowriter is Gwen Gordy, Harvey's paramour, Berry's sister. Also, it made the pop Top 40 and the R&B Top 5.
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 26th, 2010 12:15 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
Also, it made the pop Top 40 ......

Yep, #27 to be precise, which is why a near mint copy is only worth about 15 bucks. Good info.
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 26th, 2010 12:22 PM   IP              
That label is an outrageously cool design.
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 26th, 2010 10:10 PM   IP              
Just going through some stuff, really liked this b-side (the a-side is an OK doo wop) - it's weird and it's got a nice break. A song that you don't hear every day, or any day; 1959, that's just about all I know about this Lee and the Sounds record.




   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 28th, 2010 12:29 AM   IP              
It's hard to tell from the pictures, but this record is beat up pretty badly, lots of scratches and wear. It grades at roughly VG minus, and you can probably hear better clips on youtube (if someone's ever posted it). Not much known about The Selections (there's almost certainly no photo of them) - they were white, from L.A., and this, their only record, is from '58; not an easy 45 to find, and these same two songs were also released on a label named Antone - that one is even tougher to run across Two great sides; what really gets to me is the "yip yip yip" 12 seconds into "Soft and Sweet"....just a nonchalant, matter-of-fact, spoken "yip yip yip", there for no apparent reason (I mean, WTF?). I could listen to that doo wop moment over and over (I have), it's such splendid nonsense.











(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted June 28th, 2010 09:13 PM   IP              


The Shirelles first single, released on Decca in 1958. They wrote the song early in the year and performed it (as "The Porquellos") at their high school's talent show. Two subsequent singles for Decca failed to chart, and they were picked up by Scepter in 1960.


   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
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 Posted June 30th, 2010 09:52 PM   IP              


It's hard to give you the full picture of the Flamingos using my records, as their early Chance and Parrot 45s can be worth thousands, and I don't have any. I've not used any reissues on the thread (I've got plenty of them, but that would be too easy), but I've made one exception here, the multicolored Parrot below; it's still a "real" Parrot, just a 70s reissue - the original 1953 Parrot of this 45 books at $7000. in near mint (I very much doubt that more than a couple exist in that shape, maybe none at all).

With their tight, minor key harmonies, the Flamingos have a sound unlike that of any other group; there's an almost other-worldly thing going on, and it's distinct and unforgettable (check out "Lovers Never Say Goodbye" below) They didn't write too many of their songs, but they owned them just the same. All South Side Chicago neighborhood kids, they got to know each other from singing at church and just kept running with it, practicing constantly. Below are five songs from the group, including their most well known one, 1959's "I Only Have Eyes For You". I should mention - co-founder J.C. Carey is still alive and, of course, still performing - he's 87.















(Edited by hrtshpdbox)
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

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Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted July 5th, 2010 01:39 AM   IP              
Free-for-all independence type thing.




As to be expected, Sam Cooke takes on the Red Rooster with style.



Ray Charles sounds great here doing a song written by Jimmy Holiday (we've heard him upthread). This is the flip to "Yesterday".



Mac Curtis has done seven rockabilly singles for King, this one's from '58.




Read the wiki about The Cake (not to be confused with Cake) if you're interested, a lot of notables crossed their path.



Linda Worster was probably a student at Rutgers when she did two LPs, with extremely small pressings, and then apparently quit the game. Both sides of this 45 are good, but I'm just putting up the "b" today. Reminds me a lot of the McGarrigle sisters. There's a category for this type of song, it's called "loner folk", that's how sellers list it. It's also "xian", or at least the LPs are. Xian, roughly, is any religious music where there's something quirky or interesting enough to appeal to collectors - some of it goes for big bucks.



Major Lance does a great send-up of a Curtis Mayfield tune on a nice old Okeh.



The Hi-Lites.



Here's a great doo wopper, though the label is a bit beat up.



First you think it sound like the Mamas and the Papas, then you see that it was produced by Mama Cass, then you notice that it was written by Bruce Cockburn (in 1968). Innerestin'.



I posted a different, much less upbeat, track by James Ray a while ago.



You know the song.



"Bobby...Bobby...Bobby Fripp - stop listening to those weird records and go to bed, you've got school in the morning"!.



Canada's London label is the best-looking of all.



The dog actually cried, I swear it's true.



Been on a Spinner's jag since posting one of 'em the other day. This is some sublime stuff here.


   
sugar2sweet
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 Posted July 5th, 2010 11:08 AM   IP              
This thread is a veritable mine of GOLD.



Gonna round up everything in it -- I've missed some sides I need to download -- into one folder and make a playlist of it tonight.



Thanks tons for all the tunes, label shots, etc. I need to get me a copy of that Parrot-colored Flamingos 45...that's some *PRETTY* vinyl.
  
Leo K
Larry Blackmon's codpiece

Posts: 4741
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 5th, 2010 11:15 AM   IP              
This thead is incredible indeed! I'm making a playlist too...so much unknown (for me) amazing stuff.


Check out my blog...new stuff everyday: http://tevanbuskirk.wordpress.com/
   
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted July 5th, 2010 11:31 AM   IP              
Really cool that you're enjoying it, Sebastian, thanks. I was alarmed to find that the links to one of the records on an earlier page have gone dead; I checked Divshare and, sure enough, they're still listed but just won't play (if Divshare fails I'm screwed). Parrot really knew how to do a reissue, that's for sure; there's a lot of color variations, too, even with the same 45 number, probably done to encourage collectors to snap 'em all up.

Edit: Thanks, Todd, and glad you're finding something new along the way too; there's so much great music out there that we haven't heard, the "discovery" can be very satisfying, even meaningful on a personal level.
   
sugar2sweet
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 Posted July 5th, 2010 12:00 PM   IP              
I probably have the one that went down...I'll round all the files up, attach the art and catalogue numbers and release years, and upload as a folder in one batch as an overview of the music featured so far, when I get a chance.


Really is an awesome thread, one of the board's best, unique and lovingly done.
  
hrtshpdbox
Campbell's mug shot

Posts: 509
Registered: Apr 2010
 Posted July 8th, 2010 09:07 PM   IP              


Wynonie Harris was a jump blues and R&B singer/shouter who is generally credited with helping to lead jazz and blues into rock n' roll. Much more than a footnote, he was cited as a major influence by many artists including Elvis Presley. He had a slew of R&B hits in the 40s and early 50s, many of them with suggestive lyrics, and did some of his best work for Syd Nathan's King label. Harris walked the walk, too; he was a hard-chargin' drinker, gambler, and ladies man, who left dozens of scattered offspring in his wake. I've got to apologize for the sound quality of this somewhat battered 45, but it's all I have (probably); definitely take a look at some youtube clips if you like what you hear below the clicks and pops. I didn't notice the colored vinyl until I was in the middle of cleaning it; King did up some green, red, blue, and brown wax 45s in 1951 and 1952, and they're very rare (and Wynonie Harris 45s are rare in any case, as most records were still being pressed as 78s at the time). Couldn't really get the "green" with a standard photo, so I'm including a second one where I just hold the darn thing up to the light.





   



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