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.:Why I love Beat Club, and you should too.:.
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halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 12th, 2011 05:13 PM   IP              


There’s a history of rock and roll that everybody knows. You know, in the bored affluence of the postwar 1950s in America, the largest explosion of youth culture the world has ever seen gives rise to a new and dangerous music, drawing equally on budding adolescent sexual frenzy and a sheer sense of rebellion-for-the-hell-of-it. This generation of Baby Boomers goes on to spearhead one world-changing social, chemical, and musical revolution after another, vote for Reagan in ridiculous numbers, and march into retirement insisting that, with their songs, they could have stopped the war before it even started, man. Everybody’s heard this version of the story, which is extraordinarily fortunate for Peter Fonda’s career as a Time-Life infomercial pitchman.

That’s not how it went down at all in Germany, though. While those Baby Boomers in the Allied countries that had won the war grew up in relatively stable environments, their German counterparts were born into a much more turbulent and shadowy world. These were literally the sons and daughters of Nazis. And it’s not as if the former Nazi soldiers had vanished at the end of World War II; most of them returned back to private life, starting families and going to work in the country’s industries. From a musical/media standpoint, this meant that, while the rock and roll boom ran rampant throughout America and Great Britain in the 1950s and ‘60s, there was a very significant roadblock in Germany: by and large, ex-Nazis ran the music industry, the radio stations, and the television studios. It was a fact of life. And as a rule, these people were predictably not receptive to this kind of rebellion in musical form, particularly given its black American lineage. Furthermore, the country of Germany itself didn’t even exist anymore, at least not in its previous form; in its place was a socially poisonous division between the communist East Germany and the more progressively democratic West Germany. Although the German Boomers in reality had far more reason to rebel against their parents and surroundings than most of their American counterparts, they also had a hell of a lot more obstacles in the way. It is, after all, much more difficult to spearhead a youth revolution based in large part upon rock and roll music when you can’t hear, see, or buy it anywhere, and most people are more occupied with the day-to-day business of trying to keep an entire country from spinning apart at its seams.

So the widespread injection of rock and roll into West German teenage life came much later than it did in America or England. (In the still heavily oppressed East Germany, it would always remain at least somewhat illicit until the Reunification in 1990.) Initially, the only places in the country you could find rock and roll were seedy bars in rough districts of port cities like Hamburg, where bands were often imported from Great Britain to entertain the alcohol and sex-hungry sailors. Due to the fact that one of these bands turned out to be The Beatles, Germany would almost by accident make its first major contribution to the world of rock. But in these early days, rock and roll was still so heavily identified with dock-dwelling reprobates that it had yet to gain a foothold onto the country’s mainstream culture in any meaningful way. The Beatles themselves changed all that. For the German youth, Beatlemania was almost the group’s way of saying thanks to the country for giving them a place to hone their skills as performers. The phenomenon was so huge that even the straight-laced, everybody-grin-and-pretend-your-dentist-didn’t-used-to-be-a-Nazi culture of West Germany finally had to succumb. To Germans, who had missed out on most of the first decade of rock and roll’s ascendancy, The Beatles were their first liberators, serving the same function Elvis had to Americans (and to The Beatles themselves). As such, ‘rock and roll’ was never the dominant colloquial term for this music for Germans; to them, it would be definitively known as beat music.

In the wake of The Beatles’ redefinition of the German music scene, a number of homegrown bands sprang up in their image. Given the fact that they were initially based mainly on Beatles records, with absolutely no grounding in the black artists who had served as inspiration for the Fab Four, most of these bands were terrible. But to the youth of the day, ANY beat music, no matter how badly played, was a revelation, and a growing audience wanted the chance to see this music performed from their own homes. Unlike in America, where rock and roll artists had been appearing on even the most respectable mainstream television shows like Ed Sullivan for nearly ten years, none of the existing programs in Germany was willing to take a chance in showing this new music. So clearly, a new one would have to be created.



Gerhard Augustin (left) and Mike Leckenbusch (right)


Enter Gerhard (Gerd) Augustin and Mike Leckenbusch. Augustin had lived in the United States for a time during the early ‘60s, and after returning to his native Bremen, Germany, became one of the first DJs to spin rock and roll records in clubs there. He’d brought more than just records back from the U.S. with him, though. Gerd had witnessed the proliferation of pop music shows that were springing up on television in America, such as Hullabaloo and Shindig, and to him, the German market was clearly ripe for a local analog. To this end, he partnered with producer Mike Leckenbusch at the small public television network Radio Bremen to develop a new show dedicated to beat music. Leckenbusch was a former professional musician himself, having played jazz trumpet for many years before going into the television business. With Leckenbusch on hand as director and business head, and Augustin set in his initial role of creative force and host, the budding show still lacked one key element that both of them knew would be crucial: sex appeal. The awkward, somewhat nerdy Augustin was of no help in this regard, and so they recruited a 21-year-old architecture student named Uschi Nerke to act as his female on-air counterpart. Although never a major player in the show’s creative process, Uschi would become an integral part of its success. In addition to the fact that she was a frankly gorgeous woman, she had a warmth and intelligence about her that made her a particularly appealing television host, and she would become the only on-air personality to remain with the show throughout its entire seven-year run.



Uschi Nerke


Even with all the primary ingredients in place, it would take Augustin and Leckenbusch some time to convince the powers-that-be at the network to take a chance on their show. When they were finally given the green light, it was only in the most tentative possible manner: their new show would only be allowed one half-hour episode per month, shown on Saturday afternoons. While this seems like an extremely paltry ration compared to the weekly, or even daily, pop shows on American TV, it would be enough to permanently alter the state of German culture, and to eventually stake a claim as one of the greatest music-related television programs to ever exist. At 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, September 23, 1965, the first episode of Beat Club was finally aired on Radio Bremen. The public response was immediate and massive. Although much of this came from the country’s teenagers, ecstatic to now have a televised forum for their music, there was also a significant negative response from what Augustin referred to as ‘old Nazis.’ Uschi Nerke recalled one threatening letter suggesting that all those responsible for the show be sent to the gas chamber—a particularly ominous statement coming from a German of that era.

Seeing the early episodes now, it can be difficult to see what the furor was about. At the beginning, Beat Club was modest, almost unfailingly polite (the first episode even opened with an apologetic disclaimer to soften the blow for more conservative viewers), and heavily indebted to the formats of shows like American Bandstand and Shindig. Even though nobody even approaching a star came near the studio for months at a time during this early era, the show did manage to distinguish itself in a few key ways, though. Both of its creators were men who naturally lived and breathed music, and it showed. An uncommon level of attention would be paid to presenting the musical guests in as positive a light as possible, with nearly studio-quality live sound mixes, artfully shot visuals, and a diligence in archiving its episodes that shamed its overseas counterparts. While most American and British pop music television shows were considered disposable teenage dalliances by their networks, and tapes were regularly wiped for re-use, Mike Leckenbusch was nearly obsessive about making sure a complete master archive of the show was saved. Even outtake performances that never made it on air were regularly kept in the Radio Bremen vaults. So while 60s pop aficionados often find themselves frustrated at the lack of television footage that still exists from many of the legendary acts of the era, often due to tape erasure, this is never a problem with Beat Club. If an artist appeared on Beat Club, you can be sure the performance still exists, and in pristine master-quality footage. Moreover, as this is of course a product of German culture, there’s a quality of stark artiness to the presentation that sets it apart from other shows. To the eyes of a corn-fed American, this gives Beat Club performances a nearly exotic, eerie quality that other shows lack. No matter what era of the show it hails from, you can immediately recognize a clip hailing from Beat Club, even out of context.

Although Beat Club possessed this quality of distinctiveness, the style of the show continually changed throughout its run. It’s startling to realize that many of the era’s best remembered pop music shows, like Ready, Steady, Go! or Hullabaloo, were only on the air for less than two years apiece. The adaptability of Beat Club was a key factor in its relative longevity; as the musical times changed, so did the show. As such, the run of Beat Club can be roughly divided into three main eras. The first, which lasted from its inception until around the beginning of 1967, saw the show in its awkward growing stages. Initially, quality acts were difficult to come by, and although there would be increasingly frequent visits from a handful of legitimate British pop stars like The Hollies or The Walker Brothers, more often than not, episodes tended to be padded with mostly unimpressive German club bands. These bands would often perform mediocre covers of popular rock songs, and at times, the focus was as much on the audience of stiffly dancing kids as it was on the music itself. However, despite the uneven nature of many of this era’s shows, viewing them in sequence offers an undeniably fascinating glimpse into the process of building a show from a ground-level regional affair to a program capable of attracting star acts. Although from the very start, Gerd Augustin had the ambition to see this happen, he would unfortunately not be able to make the journey along with the show. Mike Leckenbusch had discovered a quicker way to bring Beat Club to international prominence—payola—and in his dealings with several high-powered British managers, the decision was made that Gerd was the wrong host for the show’s image, and he would have to go.

Although it’s cosmically unfair that Gerd should be pushed out of the show he’d co-created after only six episodes, it’s also probably true that the meteoric qualitative and commercial rise of Beat Club that followed wouldn’t have happened if he’d stayed. In early 1967, the show’s format was greatly altered, heralding the second major era, which stretched roughly to late 1969. During this time, all the homegrown elements of Beat Club would be minimized, replaced with a far more professional, almost entirely mimed, parade of British pop stars, many of whom appeared suspiciously often. German acts were no longer invited to the party. This was by and large a result of Leckenbusch’s under-the-table deals with heavy hitters of the British music industry such as Andrew Loog Oldham and Robert Wace, who were starting to realize that Germany was a vast untapped market for their acts. The show was at the same time being picked up on more networks outside of West Germany, and so a British co-host, the supremely irritating Dave Lee Travis, would be installed for added international appeal. It’s only natural to feel uneasy with the somewhat underhanded, semi-criminal business dealings that led to these developments, but it must be remembered that, particularly in this era, nearly all commercial pop music was tainted in some way by association with underworld figures. At any rate, regardless of whatever shady dealings may have led to Beat Club’s sudden ascendancy to the big leagues in 1967, few would argue with the fact that the resulting program was (Dave Lee Travis’s involvement notwithstanding) musically and visually superb, and among the most consistently brilliant pop music shows to be found anywhere in the world at that time. Month after month, some of the finest artists in Britain and America would appear, often accompanied by imaginative visual effects that would push the envelope of the way musical performances could be presented on television. Each episode became a self-contained piece of pop art.



Uschi Nerke with Dave Lee Travis, 1967


The shift to the third and final main era of Beat Club was more gradual, but the end result was no less dramatic a sea change. When the show expanded to an hour in 1968, much of the extra time would be filled with interview features, pop news, and a variety of films. Over time, the show would start to re-embrace the overtly weird German artistic culture which had spawned it, and many of these filmed features started to get odder and odder in nature. This in turn started to seep into the musical side of the equation as well. Dave Lee Travis left, bands gradually began playing live again rather than miming, and by the time Beat Club started to broadcast in color at the beginning of 1970, the show had morphed into something much more progressive, and somewhat without precedent. They’d get freaky musical guests no other show would even touch, some of whom increasingly came from Germany’s budding Krautrock scene. Performances would become almost limitlessly freewheeling. It wasn’t uncommon for a song clocking in well above the ten minute range to be shown in its entirety (on a few occasions, individual songs cracked the twenty minute mark), all the time accompanied by even more eye-popping psychedelic visuals, which sometimes threatened to overwhelm the artists themselves. These were progressive times in rock music to be sure, but the sheer level of fuck-all-commercial-concerns audacity on display during this era was something you just weren’t going to find anywhere else. These tendencies would only continue to develop until Beat Club was cancelled in December of 1972.

The story wouldn’t end there, though, as within a week, the show was replaced on Radio Bremen by a new program called Musikladen. In essence, this was merely a case of rebranding, as director Mike Leckenbusch would remain at the helm, with Uschi Nerke retained as on-air host. Although it was a bit more straightforward in appearance and lacked the same revolutionary cultural gravitas as its predecessor, Musikladen would continue to feature many classic performances during its own twelve-year duration, before the franchise was finally put to rest in 1984. But the influence continued to spread. Clips of both shows were regularly licensed out for music video programming during the early days of cable television, making many of the performances well-known throughout America for the first time. Due to the fastidiously maintained Beat Club archives, it became a favorite source of footage for musically oriented documentaries as well, introducing the show to film viewers in the process.

As an avid fan of both ‘60s pop music and early 70s rock, particularly of the exploratory German variety, I have been a Beat Club enthusiast for years. I recall first taking particular note of it when I saw the unsettling nuclear yellow-bathed clip of Can, one of my favorite bands, performing “Paperhouse” on their 2003 DVD set. I was immediately fascinated by it; what the hell kind of TV show would feature an extended live performance from a band like Can in such an early era for them, before they’d achieved anything even approaching a hit? What was the deal with the swimming psychedelic effects, and why did a list of the band members suddenly pop up onscreen halfway through, only to disappear again, while the band continued to jam on for minutes on end afterwards, far beyond the acceptable time limit for most performances on television shows? With the advent of YouTube, I was able to view a multitude of clips from other favorite bands, some of the same colorfully odd nature, and some mimed in stark black and white, and I slowly began to piece together the fact that these all originally hailed from the same television show. I eventually bought a few bootleg DVDs of Beat Club clips, hungrily devouring them despite the fact that they were often shoddily presented, with the audio and visuals heavily out of sync with each other. But when I finally got my hands on the official 24-disc Beat Club Story boxed set, I truly realized for the first time the scope of what this show had to offer, and I knew I’d have to fully immerse myself into its world from the beginning.

Finding satisfactory information online about Beat Club can be frustrating. Aside from the fact that a lot of what’s out there is written in German, a language I don’t speak a word of, there’s just not much of it, and what is there is generally fairly paltry. Online episode guides are often riddled with inaccuracies, and it’s extremely difficult to find information about many of the more obscure acts that appeared on the show. It deserves a more thorough treatment than what’s out there. That’s what I’m going to attempt to remedy with these writings, even if only for my own benefit. Aside from the fact that Beat Club was one of the most important pop shows ever to air on television, particularly in Germany, where it played a large part in shaping the rise of rock music as a cultural force, it also bears a fascinating story. Charting the history of the show is a whirlwind journey through changing fashions in music and pop culture of the era, and along the way, the stories of a parade of artists, some famous, some obscure, rise to the fore. And above all else, it’s just entertaining as hell. This is no mere museum piece; it’s an incredibly fun show to immerse yourself in, with fantastic music bounding in from all directions. Even the shittier musical moments on the show are heavy with entertainment value most of the time. My goal in these writings is to take you through each of the 83 episodes of Beat Club, breaking down each into their component parts, giving background information on each of the featured artists, and offering a bit of critical analysis along the way (since I can’t keep my damn mouth shut). When videos of performances are available on the internet, I’ll post them so that you can follow along if you’re so inclined. Seems like an enjoyable enough way to kill spare time over the next year or so.



(Edited by halleluwah)

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 12th, 2011 05:17 PM   IP              
GREAT thread, I'll be popping in some faves and telling of my first acquaintance with the show. I love Uschi too. Her skirts and boots are hotcha.
   
Justin
Charles Nelson Reilly's SHORTS!

Posts: 854
Registered: Apr 2011
 Posted August 12th, 2011 06:02 PM   IP              


I fucking love this version. I believe that Musik Laden was the same show as Beat Club, with a different name.

Our Band could be Your Life.
   
Justin
Charles Nelson Reilly's SHORTS!

Posts: 854
Registered: Apr 2011
 Posted August 12th, 2011 06:03 PM   IP              


The last one didn't show up! Should work this time....

Our Band could be Your Life.
   
andy rooney
The Indian Of The Group

Posts: 1872
Registered: Nov 2010
 Posted August 12th, 2011 06:45 PM   IP              
i hope this counts



the gather 'round the gretsch is fantastic

sexy dragon magic.
   
andy rooney
The Indian Of The Group

Posts: 1872
Registered: Nov 2010
 Posted August 12th, 2011 06:49 PM   IP              
holy crap, why have i never looked up beat club on youtube before



i gotta learn to dance like that guy

sexy dragon magic.
   
andy rooney
The Indian Of The Group

Posts: 1872
Registered: Nov 2010
 Posted August 12th, 2011 06:59 PM   IP              
ozzy rules



the hair toss at 1:15

sexy dragon magic.
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 12th, 2011 08:10 PM   IP              
Yeah! Those are great clips. I love that there's some really good original Monks footage that exists because of Beat Club.

Justin, you're right. When Beat Club ended in late '72, Radio Bremen (the German network it was on) replaced it with Musikladen, which was basically more of the same, although it returned to the no-frills, live studio audience format that Beat Club proper had abandoned a few years earlier. They even retained Uschi Nerke as host, so it really is a continuation. Unfortunately, my set doesn't follow the show into the Musikladen years, but any clips from that era are totally welcome. That Stevie Wonder clip is a classic.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 13th, 2011 03:07 AM   IP              



Beat Club episode 1
9/25/1965
All performances live

* = Jason's recommendations

1. Introduction by Wilhelm Wieben
2. The Yankees - Halbstark (with opening titles)
3. The Yankees – Tequila*
4. The Yankees - Always And Ever
5. The Yankees - Help
6. The Liverbirds - Peanut Butter
7. The Liverbirds – Interview/Why Do You Hang Around Me*
8. The Liverbirds – Bo Diddley Daddy*
9. John O'Hara & His Playboys - I'm Down
10. John O'Hara & His Playboys - We've Got To Get Out Of This Place
11. John O'Hara & His Playboys - Wooly Bully*
12. Closing Credits (Wooly Bully continues)


FULL EPISODE: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4585.html


"Good day, dear Beat friends. The time has come. In few seconds we will begin the first show on German television made especially for you. As for you Ladies and Gentlemen who do not like Beat music, we ask for your understanding: this is a live show for young people. And now we're taking off..."

This brief introductory cold open from period television presenter Wilhelm Wieben is the first thing ever shown on Beat Club. As with most dialogue that would be spoken on the show, it's in German, of course, with no subtitles, so I generally have to guess at what the hell these people are saying. Fortunately, I found a translation of this particular passage online, and it's notable that in its very first moments, the show was already acknowledging that this was something new, and that some of the more conservative viewers might not be ready for it. This statement would prove prophetic, as even this relatively tame first show would receive a response of complaints pouring into Radio Bremen. But this was just the initial springboard to a show that would eventually push the envelope of public taste as much as nearly any other of the era.

After Weibern's introduction, the first band to appear on the debut episode of Beat Club was The Yankees. Even for the standards of the first handful of Beat Club episodes, where few of the bands are still widely remembered today, this is an obscure band. I can't find a single damn thing about them on the internet, in fact. They're obviously a local German band, which makes the fact that they all dress in Union Civil War uniforms all the more bizarre. Over the opening credits, they deliver Beat Club’s first-ever musical performance, “Halbstark,” a song heavily indebted to early Beatles with German lyrics. Pay close attention at 1:10 in this clip for the birth of an early Beat Club hallmark: a hilarious closeup of a group of humorless, very white teenagers stiffly attempting to get down on the dance floor.


http://youtu.be/WqI10jWq5Yg


After this song, we’re immediately introduced to the founder of this feast, Gerd Augustin. It's immediately apparent why the decision was made to give him a co-host; his delivery is a bit awkward, and given his horn-rimmed glasses and conservative tweed suit, you'd assume him to be just some network stiff who didn't have a clue about rock and roll if you didn't know any better. However, this shot also introduces us to a very young and cute Uschi Nerke, and it's immediately obvious she was the perfect choice for the job. Whatever Gerd may lack in personal charisma, she more than makes up for.

Anyway, Die Yankees continue on for three more songs, the best of which is a spirited cover of “Tequila” (in which the title is replaced by them yelling “Yankees!” in unison), led by a Duane Eddy-esque twangy melodic guitar approach and some fine drumming.


http://youtu.be/_Bkf-bpVGDg


The Yankees play another couple of tunes, including an amusingly thick-accented version of “Help,” but come across as nothing more than a solid period club band. It is noticeable how good the sound balance is for a live TV music broadcast of the period. There are some times on this show where it’s not immediately obvious whether a performer is playing live or miming, just because of how clear the live sound is at times. Despite the modest (bordering on cheap-looking) set that is basically a brick-walled warehouse, right from the beginning you can tell this is a show that seems to care more about sonic presentation than most of its contemporaries.

Following next is The Liverbirds, an all-female rock band hailing from Liverpool. Like The Beatles before them (again, their most obvious stylistic influence), they had made the journey to the Hamburg club circuit, where they'd become a sensation at the Star Club. Unlike the Beatles, however, The Liverbirds took up more or less permanent residence in Germany, using that country as their home base, and they never attained much success in their native England. As a band, they're not exactly overladen with talent, but they’re spirited as hell, and an awful lot of fun. The drummer, who spends the entire time grinning from ear to ear as she pounds away at the basic backbeat, is especially entertaining. And it must be remembered that there were precious few all-female rock bands making it as self-contained units at the time, so there's a certain trailblazing quality to the group as well. The group opens with "Peanut Butter," a joyous dance stomper with nonsense lyrics in the proud "Woolly Bully" tradition.


http://youtu.be/-essM3zzcrY


They then do a brief interview (where their thick Liverpool accents are particularly endearing) followed by their recent single “Why Do You Hang Around Me.” This is a slightly slower tune heavily indebted to the early Merseybeat sound, and although there are a few rough spots on the vocal harmonies, it works well. It's intriguing to hear a song that sounds like this sung from a distinctively female perspective.


http://youtu.be/-C4wHH4waAk


The Liverbirds finish up their set with their greatest commercial success, an energetic version of Bo Diddley’s “Bo Diddley Daddy” that had recently reached #5 on the German charts. The crowd is obviously getting off on this tune, the most extended performance on this episode, and this clip home to some particularly comical honky-dancing shots. The Liverbirds would be a casualty of changing tastes in beat music, breaking up in 1968, but three of its four members would permanently remain in Germany afterwards. This would be their only appearance on Beat Club.


http://youtu.be/xyS8KkGyV1c


The last band featured on this show is John O’Hara and the Playboys, and again the specter of early Beatles hangs heavy over their performance, right down to their black ties/vests stage uniforms, which look like they were stolen directly from backstage at the Cavern Club. The preponderance of Mersey vibe throughout this debut episode makes a lot of sense; after all, through the presence of the Beatles and other UK bands who played abroad, the sound was developed in Germany just as much as it was in Britain in the first place, and it was obviously still popular there, even as The Beatles themselves were moving on from it. At any rate, O’Hara, who, unlike The Liverbirds, remained based out of his native Sheffield, begins appropriately enough with a cover of “I’m Down,” before moving on to “We Gotta Get Out of This Place” and “Wooly Bully.” All of these are played well, but none threaten the originals either, and “We Gotta Get Out” in particular suffers a bit from O’Hara not possessing anywhere near the weight of Eric Burdon as a vocalist. They’re alright, though.


http://youtu.be/etfSJoKwoLk


For “Wooly Bully,” an additionally surreal touch occurs when the crowd of teens starts in on this odd, organized-looking line dance that looks basically like a traditional German folk dance or something. It’s a bit of a bizarre combination, but one of the more indelible and representative images from this very early time in Beat Club's run.


http://youtu.be/58GOPZvB76Y


Over the band’s vamp on this song, Gerd and Uschi sign off (edited out of this clip for some reason), and the closing credits roll.

This debut episode of Beat Club is hardly a definitive snapshot of what the show would become; at this early date, most of what would become known as signature hallmarks are still absent. There are no video effects, nobody even approaching a pop star is present, and the focus is just as much on the dancers as it is on the performers themselves, most of whom restrict themselves to crowd-pleasing cover material. It’s clearly primarily a dance show aimed at a younger crowd, and a modest one at that. Still, even from these tentative early steps, you can tell this isn't a run-of-the-mill show. As mentioned, the sound mix is well-balanced far beyond the level that most contemporary pop shows would even aspire to, and there is an obvious artistic bent to many of the camera frame compositions. This may have been a brand new show put on buy people who had never done music on TV before, but they clearly had a vision of how they wanted to present it. This vision would continually evolve as the show went on, but presently, the focus would have to be on attracting a higher caliber of musical guest.



(Edited by halleluwah)

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Justin
Charles Nelson Reilly's SHORTS!

Posts: 854
Registered: Apr 2011
 Posted August 13th, 2011 06:03 AM   IP              
The drummer for the Liverbirds reminds me of a female version of Keith Moon. The Liverbirds really aren't that good, but you do have to admire their pep.
Our Band could be Your Life.
   
alan
Richard Thompson's G-String

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Registered: Sep 2007
 Posted August 13th, 2011 08:56 AM   IP              
Dave Lee Travis was indeed one of the biggest tools ever. He was on BBC Radio 1 for fucking years and did TOTP for most of the 60's and 70's. Possibly the 80's as well. Most of the Radio 1 DJ's (and in the UK that was the ONLY station you could listen to pop music on) were of the same ilk.

Can't remember whether its Beat Club or Music Laden but there is a clip of the MC5 which is mindblowing.

I've seen lots of clips from Beat Club over the years = as Jason says, a lot of TOTP got wiped so most of the existing tv footage of some wonderful (and not so wonderful...) bands is still around thanks to that show.
   
The Venerable Gould
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 Posted August 13th, 2011 11:36 AM   IP              
excellent thread. does anyone know what percentage of stuff is in circulation? so they kept copies of EVERY episode? That's pretty fucking amazing when you think about it. I know nobody will give a shit but an edit of an epic Quo performance from 1970 turned up on youtube recently-ish where they look absolutely bad-ass and I'd kill to see an unedited clip - the song could've been anything from 10 to 20 minutes long. Oh what I'd give to see that...
Likewise two hitherto unknown string band songs were supposed to get a dvd release and arent in circulation at the moment but dunno what's happened to that release though. goddamnit!
  
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 13th, 2011 12:11 PM   IP              
I LOVE this thread! Keep up the summaries, J!!! That is so my type of deal.
Love those Liverbirds clips.

   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 13th, 2011 12:57 PM   IP              
Quote:
The Venerable Gould wrote:
excellent thread. does anyone know what percentage of stuff is in circulation? so they kept copies of EVERY episode? That's pretty fucking amazing when you think about it. I know nobody will give a shit but an edit of an epic Quo performance from 1970 turned up on youtube recently-ish where they look absolutely bad-ass and I'd kill to see an unedited clip - the song could've been anything from 10 to 20 minutes long. Oh what I'd give to see that...
Likewise two hitherto unknown string band songs were supposed to get a dvd release and arent in circulation at the moment but dunno what's happened to that release though. goddamnit!
Yeah...basically, the whole series still exists. There are a couple of annoying exceptions, but none that are a deal-breaker for me. There were several late-60s shows that initially included The Beatles on film (the standard ones: Strawberry Fields, Paperback Writer, Something, etc). In all the cases, these videos have been edited out of the Beat Club shows, so I don't have them on my DVDs. But everybody's seen those videos anyway, and we at least know where they originally were in the episodes, so that's not a huge deal. Also, there were a few retrospective clip episodes, entirely consisting of clips from previous shows, and as far as I know, these don't circulate among collectors in and of themselves either. Again, we do know what clips were shown on these retrospectives, though, so anybody who's really interested can just look them up in sequence on YouTube.

By the way, just in case anybody's interested, the set I own is 24 discs and easily available from iOffer, so if you're into it and have an all-region DVD player, here's the link: http://www.ioffer.com/i/beat-club-s...top-q-191494172


I do know there are some outtakes that exist from the show; sometimes in the later days, bands would actually perform a whole set of songs at a taping session, and then only a few would be aired. I've seen a few DVD compilations of Beat Club outtakes from specific artists, but I'm sure there's a lot of stuff still in the can there. But as far as the properly aired episodes, as far as I know, they're all circulating.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 13th, 2011 01:04 PM   IP              
Quote:
alan wrote:
Dave Lee Travis was indeed one of the biggest tools ever. He was on BBC Radio 1 for fucking years and did TOTP for most of the 60's and 70's. Possibly the 80's as well. Most of the Radio 1 DJ's (and in the UK that was the ONLY station you could listen to pop music on) were of the same ilk.

Can't remember whether its Beat Club or Music Laden but there is a clip of the MC5 which is mindblowing.

I've seen lots of clips from Beat Club over the years = as Jason says, a lot of TOTP got wiped so most of the existing tv footage of some wonderful (and not so wonderful...) bands is still around thanks to that show.


Yeah, first time I ever saw Dave Lee Travis, it was on the Joe Boyd Hendrix movie, where he comes across like an insufferable schmuck just in his five seconds of screen time ("there you have it! REAL psychedelic songs from the JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE!"). (That clip is from a '67 Beat Club episode live from the Marquee Club that also features The Who and is awesome, by the way.) But he co-hosted this show for like three years, so I gotta get used to him, I guess...

That MC5 clip is awesome. It's right at the end of their career, but they still sound great.


Thanks for the responses, everybody. I'm really hoping I can keep up the stamina to make it all the way through the series on here. It's an addictively fun show to watch for me.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
The Venerable Gould
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Registered:
 Posted August 13th, 2011 01:24 PM   IP              
Quote:
halleluwah wrote:
Yeah...basically, the whole series still exists. There are a couple of annoying exceptions, but none that are a deal-breaker for me. There were several late-60s shows that initially included The Beatles on film (the standard ones: Strawberry Fields, Paperback Writer, Something, etc). In all the cases, these videos have been edited out of the Beat Club shows, so I don't have them on my DVDs. But everybody's seen those videos anyway, and we at least know where they originally were in the episodes, so that's not a huge deal. Also, there were a few retrospective clip episodes, entirely consisting of clips from previous shows, and as far as I know, these don't circulate among collectors in and of themselves either. Again, we do know what clips were shown on these retrospectives, though, so anybody who's really interested can just look them up in sequence on YouTube.

By the way, just in case anybody's interested, the set I own is 24 discs and easily available from iOffer, so if you're into it and have an all-region DVD player, here's the link: http://www.ioffer.com/i/beat-club-s...top-q-191494172


I do know there are some outtakes that exist from the show; sometimes in the later days, bands would actually perform a whole set of songs at a taping session, and then only a few would be aired. I've seen a few DVD compilations of Beat Club outtakes from specific artists, but I'm sure there's a lot of stuff still in the can there. But as far as the properly aired episodes, as far as I know, they're all circulating.



those dvds look great! the only problem i have with the beat club dvds is that they either get released on little dvd eps, like the byrds one that i have and i think there's a quo one too, that just dont have enough songs to warrant me gettting them. like i never sit down and watch the byrds one when i can just youtube them. and then bigger collections like that one above are just too big for me. i wish there was a way you could just download the performances you want and make your own collections. well, i expect there probably are ways of doing that on the net but i cant burn dvds cos my dvd drive is broken so i've never looked into it.

and so there were outtakes you say? i think that explains the two mystery ISB songs then as im pretty sure they were never originally broadcast.
  
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 13th, 2011 01:44 PM   IP              
Quote:
The Venerable Gould wrote:


those dvds look great! the only problem i have with the beat club dvds is that they either get released on little dvd eps, like the byrds one that i have and i think there's a quo one too, that just dont have enough songs to warrant me gettting them. like i never sit down and watch the byrds one when i can just youtube them. and then bigger collections like that one above are just too big for me. i wish there was a way you could just download the performances you want and make your own collections. well, i expect there probably are ways of doing that on the net but i cant burn dvds cos my dvd drive is broken so i've never looked into it.

and so there were outtakes you say? i think that explains the two mystery ISB songs then as im pretty sure they were never originally broadcast.


Yeah, I'd imagine that's the case with the ISB songs; I don't exactly recall, but I think they only have one or two songs aired through the entire series (I haven't watched the whole thing yet). It wouldn't be surprising if they taped some additional songs that were never shown at the time. You can see a bunch of DVDs on this page (http://www.ioffer.com/search/items/...at%20club%20dvd) for bands like MC5, The Doors, John Mayall, etc. that contain outtakes, usually three or four extra songs. I think I've seen a DVD with like six songs from the '71 version of the Jeff Beck group, only one of which actually aired. I haven't explored any of these outtakes, but I guess there are some ones out there.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

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 Posted August 13th, 2011 04:08 PM   IP              
Beat-Club episode 2
10/30/1965
All performances live

1. Opening credits: Letters sent in by viewers are shown on screen, music: "Satisfaction"
2. The Phantoms - See See Rider*
3. Gerd interviews The Phantoms
4. The Phantoms - Hang On Sloopy
5. The Phantoms - Please Mr. Postman*
6. Uschi Nerke interviews Herr Gunther/Ian & The Zodiacs - Living Loving Wreck
7. Ian & The Zodiacs - Face In The Crowd*
8. Ian & The Zodiacs - All Of Me
9. The German Blue Flames - Too Much Monkey Business
10. The German Blue Flames - You've Got Your Troubles, I've Got Mine*
11. The German Blue Flames - Sunbeams At The Sky
12. Uschi reads Hit Parade Top 10 with accompaniment by German Blue Flames*
13. The German Blue Flames - Teen Scene (with closing credits)


FULL EPISODE: http://video.mail.ru/mail/vakula196.../1971/1973.html


The second episode of Beat Club shows the program already fucking with its formula a bit, as in place of an opening title sequence, a 90-second montage of fan letters is shown, soundtracked by The Rolling Stones’ “Satisfaction.” Immediately after this, Uschi and Gerd come on, introducing the first band of the show, The Phantoms. This turns out to be another German dance band, professional but a bit thinner-sounding than those from the previous episode. Their set consists of perennial chestnuts “See See Rider,” “Hang On Sloopy,” and “Please Mr. Postman,” along with a brief interview with Gerd, in which he introduces the members. The group has two singers: an ineffectual turtlenecked cracker guy who appears to be named Bonnie(?) and a striking, severe looking woman named Tonya, both of whom sing with thick accents. Her voice has a certain powerful urgency to it not entirely dissimilar to Mariska Veres from Shocking Blue though, which sounds a little strange on the material, but works well anyway. Bonnie’s reading of “Hang On Sloopy,” however, is entirely forgettable. Only “See See Rider” appears to be currently available on YouTube.


http://youtu.be/H1Fptw2mtnQ


After this, Uschi briefly interviews some suit named Herr Gunther about some damn thing, after which Gerd introduces Ian and the Zodiacs, another Liverpool beat group of the type who already seemed outdated by this point in late 1965. It’s really getting humorous how closely so many of these bands were still sewing themselves onto the Beatles’ coattails, right down to the suits and Hofner basses. That said, as far as minor Merseybeat bands go, they really aren’t that bad, just extraordinarily unoriginal.


http://youtu.be/Y9fFuZtNrrs


The high point of Ian and the Zodiacs’ set comes with their own folk/country-tinged “Face In the Crowd,” a reasonably good song which mainly distinguishes itself by not sounding that much like The Beatles.


http://youtu.be/84opr01ZSoo


The final band of the show is The German Blue Flames, a bowtied crew who were apparently a bit of a big deal in their home country at that time. They kick off with the whitest version of “Too Much Monkey Business” you’ll ever hear. They’re not bad players, but in an attempt to mask their accents, each of the band members takes a verse in increasingly annoying silly voices, which basically kills it.


http://youtu.be/boeDZK7v6-g


Things improve a bit with the band’s high point in the set, "You've Got Your Troubles," a dreamily melodic teen crooner originally by The Fortunes. They do a pretty good job of harnessing this song’s dynamics, I think.


http://youtu.be/R7I4WotD-Ws


After a fairly unremarkable third number, The German Blue Flames assist in the debut of a feature that would remain a Beat Club standard for the next few years: a rundown of the top ten hits on the week of filming (later, this would be changed to the top seven for some reason). Strangely, it is the UK hit parade chart that would always be used for this feature, not the German one. In this unique debut edition of the list, the Flames stay onstage behind Uschi and Gerd as they read down the list, playing snippets of some of the songs, including The Hollies’ “Look Through Any Window,” Barry McGuire’s “Eve of Destruction,” and Manfred Mann’s cover of “If You Gotta Go, Go Now.” Incidentally, the #1 record in the UK that week was comedian Ken Dodd’s “Tears.” Perversely, I find this sweetly shambolic segment to be the most entertaining part of this episode; pity it’s not on YouTube. Immediately after the countdown is over, the hosts sign off, and the closing credits roll over footage of the teens dancing to an uptempo blues vamp from the German Blue Flames.


(Edited by halleluwah)

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

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 Posted August 13th, 2011 04:45 PM   IP              
This stuff is awesome!
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 13th, 2011 08:06 PM   IP              



Beat-Club Episode 3
12/4/1965
All performances live, except where noted

1. Introduction by Wilhelm Wiebern/Opening Titles: The Mushroams - Get Off Of My Cloud
2. The Mushroams - Mercy, Mercy*
3. The Mushroams & Susanne Weber - I'm Gonna Knock On Your Door
4. Sonny & Cher - I Got You Babe (On film for Hullaballoo)
5. The Rattles - Come On And Sing*
6. The Rattles - Little Queenie
7. The Rattles – She’s The One
8. The Rattles - (Stoppin’ in) Las Vegas*
9. Uschi Nerke interviews Knud Kuntze
10. Gerry & The Pacemakers - Dizzy Miss Lizzy
11. Gerry & The Pacemakers - Ferry Cross The Mersey*
12. Hit Parade - Top 10 countdown featuring photos and audio excerpts from records
13. Gerry & The Pacemakers - My Babe
14. Closing credits (My Babe continues)


FULL EPISODE PART 1: http://video.mail.ru/mail/vakula196.../1971/1974.html
FULL EPISODE PART 2: http://video.mail.ru/mail/vakula196.../1971/1975.html



The third episode of Beat Club, and the last to be broadcast in 1965, marks a few firsts for the show. For one thing, while the first two shows focused almost entirely on covers of hit songs and obscure (or almost obscure, in the case of Ian and the Zodiacs) Beatles-copycat bands, here we have a couple of legitimate pop star acts, performing major hits that they made famous themselves. It is also the first episode which features a performance that was not filmed live in the Beat Club studios. And for the first time, an American act is featured, alongside the usual British and German bands.

As with the debut episode, we cold open with Wilhelm Wiebern making a brief introductory announcement standing outside the Beat Club studios, before leading the camera inside, where a German band called The Mushroams is already in the midst of a mediocre version of “Get Off My Cloud.” The singer sounds like perhaps he doesn’t really speak English and only learned the words phonetically, because most of them are completely unintelligible. The Mushroams are, however, notable as the first band on this program to be noticeably much more oriented towards the Stones side of the equation than the Beatles. The opening Beat Club titles appear on the screen as the camera roams around the crowd of stiffly dancing teenagers.


http://youtu.be/KPYYkZVUhb0


The band continues with a take on the Stones’ cover of Don Covay’s “Mercy Mercy,” which comes off much better, with a great loud bass tone and some extremely funny dancing moments from the crowd. The singer with the Walker Brothers haircut still doesn’t sound particularly soulful, but he’s doing a decent job of trying to get the inflections down.


http://youtu.be/9C7JAYBMEqo


A pigtailed Uschi then comes on to introduce a woman named Susan Weber, who joins the Mushroams to sing a version of Eddie Hodges’ “I’m Gonna Knock On Your Door.”


http://rutube.ru/tracks/1522495.htm...b60e8f691a3f1ae


At this point, Gerd herds the studio audience around a tiny television set, and as he (presumably) explains what’s about to happen, cues up a clip of current American pop superstars Sonny and Cher that was taped on Hullaballoo, performing their smash “I Got You Babe.” They perform live vocals to a pre-recorded backing track, and from time to time a camera pans around to insert shots of the German youth watching the television. Up until this moment, Beat Club had been a purely European affair, and the bands and dancing kids had been on more or less equal footing in importance. Here, for the first time, the dancers take a break for a moment, and the focus is entirely on the performance, and a superstar performance of a hit song to boot. Even though this was only a filmed clip leased from another program, in hindsight this was where Beat Club first showed where its ambitions truly lay.


Afterwards, we go to a shot of Uschi leaning against a TV set showing Uschi leaning against a TV set etc. (dude, you just blew my mind) in what could be considered the first of the famed Beat Club visual tricks, and she introduces our next live band, The Rattles. Though hardly a household name, this German band is at least remembered enough to have its own Wikipedia page. They were a pretty big deal in their homeland, and would even cross over onto the UK charts, having a hit record with “The Witch” in 1968. They’re a fine garage band with a lot of loose power in their delivery, and if their rocking menace is a bit undercut by their blond singer’s ridiculous puffy sweater and an underwhelming cover of “Little Queenie,” they still come across really well to me. Their opening song, “Come On and Sing,” is my favorite of their four song set. There’s plenty of other vintage Rattles footage on there, though, attesting to their relative importance as one of Germany’s leading 60s bands.


Come On and Sing: http://youtu.be/ZgiztkcUIl0

Little Queenie: http://video.mail.ru/mail/barabash..../1649/1659.html


The Rattles’ set is followed by an interesting moment, in which Uschi interviews Knud Kuntze, who up until the previous year had been the bassist with The Lords, another of Germany’s leading rock bands of the era. After he quit the band, he went on (as “Lord Knud”) to become one of Germany’s most prominent DJs, but here it at least seems like they’re mainly discussing why he’d left The Lords. The Lords themselves would appear on the next episode of Beat Club.

At this point, another prominent and well-remembered band is introduced: Gerry and the Pacemakers. This band had a track record of several sizeable hits, including three consecutive British #1s, but by December 1965, their career had taken a sharp decline, and they would break up before the end of the following year. It’s interesting to note that the heavy Merseybeat influence, which had been so prominent in the first two Beat Club episodes, was only represented in this show by a once formidable band on its last legs. The times were a-changing. At any rate, the Pacemakers open with a version of “Dizzy Miss Lizzy” whose comparative politeness is no match for Lennon’s howled performance with The Beatles, before finding more stable ground with a fine reading of “Ferry ‘Cross the Mersey,” one of their last big hits. This was a band whose reputation was made more on melodic pop than on rocking ability, and it’s easy to see why here.


Dizzy Miss Lizzy: http://youtu.be/EN-9hfJ59rw

Ferry Cross the Mersey: http://youtu.be/-GWoV4r67h0


Gerd sits down to read the Top 11 Hit Parader countdown, here presented with photos of the artists and a snippet of each song playing. The list on this week contained such classics as Dylan’s “Positively Fourth Street,” The Toys’ “Lovers’ Concerto,” the Stones’ “Get Off My Cloud,” and The Who’s “My Generation,” but was topped by The Seekers’ “The Carnival Is Over.” Hmmm.

After the customary hosts’ sign-off, Gerry and the Pacemakers return to give the dancers an uptempo sendoff with “My Babe," and the end credits roll on this important transitional Beat Club episode. The next episode would not be broadcast for a full month and a half, but would introduce more firsts for the show, as well as a couple of performers who would become recurring figures.


http://rutube.ru/tracks/1526856.htm...e4d8b3144a52062



(Edited by halleluwah)

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 13th, 2011 08:19 PM   IP              
Fuck, this thread is killer. A magnum opus! TWO MORE EPISODES!
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 13th, 2011 08:45 PM   IP              
Thanks! I didn't have anything else to do today!


I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
Matinee Idyll (129)
Camp Counsellor

Posts: 8244
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 13th, 2011 08:45 PM   IP              
This is killer Jase! Amazing, I'm gonna start a rival 'Beat Beat Beat' thread!
"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 15th, 2011 02:32 AM   IP              



Beat-Club Episode 4
1/22/1966
All performances live, except where noted

1. Opening Titles (With The Lords - Shakin' All Over)
2. The Lords - Que sera, sera
3. The Remo Four - Peter Gunn*
4. The Remo Four - Like A Rolling Stone
5. Chris Andrews - Yesterday Man (mimed)/Interview w/ Gerd
6. Chris Andrews - To Whom In Concerns (mimed)
7. The Remo Four - But I Was Cool
8. The Lords - Poor Boy
9. The Lords - Wishin' And Hopin' 

10. Gerd interviews The Lords’ singer
11. The Lords - I'm A Hog For You Baby*
12. The Lords – Greensleeves
13. The Lords - Boom Boom
14. Closing Credits (Boom Boom continues)


FULL EPISODE PART 1: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4589.html
FULL EPISODE PART 2: http://video.mail.ru/mail/vakula196.../1971/1977.html


The first Beat Club episode of 1966 opens with the titles superimposed over footage of teenagers eagerly turning in their tickets at the front door, accompanied by a recording of The Lords playing “Shakin’ All Over.” The Lords themselves, the first band on our program this evening, then take the stage, and amusingly, they appear to be running their own sound, as the singer has to check his mic while turning knobs on a pre-amp to get his levels. The Lords were one of Germany’s most popular rock bands of the sixties, and would be featured heavily throughout this episode. This was a band who clearly didn’t take themselves that seriously, which becomes immediately evident as they launch into their first song, an uptempo beat version of “Que Sera Sera.” All of the members sport the same type of exaggerated Prince Valliant hairstyle (remember that Little Lord 45 sleeve that Andy used to use as his avatar a while back? They all look like that), they’re all wearing an identical outfit of tuxedos with frilly shirts and huge bowties, and the frontman engages in comical knobby-kneed dancing as he sings. He also seems to accentuate his German pronunciations more than most vocalists on this show (“quivers down ze back bone!”), which I think was probably intentional. Depending on your perspective, they’re either a lot of fun or fairly annoying, but I find them enjoyable enough. At least in small doses.


http://youtu.be/t_Hh6f7iBnk


The Lords would return for several more songs later in the show, but in the meantime, Gerd comes on to introduce a band that would become one of the show’s most popular acts in its early days: The Remo Four. This Liverpudlian combo would return for several more appearances, sometimes backing up other vocalists, to the point of being something close to a Beat Club house band at times. I think they’re an uncommonly good group of musicians, and two of them, keyboardist Tony Ashton (who would eventually go on to play with stars such as Eric Clapton and George Harrison) and drummer Roy Dyke, would return to the show yet again for a handful of appearances in 1970/71 as part of an R&B trio called Ashton, Gardner, and Dyke. Their debut performance on the show consisted of a tough instrumental workout on the Peter Gunn theme, highlighted by Dyke’s explosive drumming and guitarist Colin Manley’s hilariously shameless mugging for the camera.


http://youtu.be/NpxktaNuuuw


Uschi briefly introduces the band members, and they launch into a Manley-sung version of “Like a Rolling Stone,” the first of many Dylan covers the show would host through the years. It’s not an especially great version (nowhere NEAR the worst “Rolling Stone” cover in Beat Club history, though), truncated by a couple of verses and overly mannered, but there’s one interesting thing about this performance: for the first time, the crowd stops dancing and just stands there to watch the band playing. This would happen increasingly frequently as the focus of the show shifted away from dancing and more onto the music itself.


http://youtu.be/7SyP-L6RZUY


An even greater shift away from what we’ve seen before occurs next, as clean-cut British singer Chris Andrews gets up on a riser in the middle of the crowd with no visible band in sight and launches into his single “Yesterday Man.” Andrews thus became the first artist ever to mime a song on Beat Club, and to drive the point home, he does a fairly poor job of it, entirely missing his cue to come in on the first line of the song. From here on out, mimed performances would gradually become more commonplace on the show, until they started to take up almost all of most episodes by sometime in 1967; this practice would last until Beat Club returned to an entirely live format in 1970. In the meantime, though, miming was still a novelty for this program, and Andrews’ song is met with enthusiastic (although rhythmically challenged) clapping from the audience; “Yesterday Man” was a #1 hit in Germany for four straight weeks around this time. It’s a fairly bland pop song given a bit of lift by a then-unusual semi-reggae beat.


http://youtu.be/ltzyxSnfbpU


Gerd then briefly interviews Andrews in English before he returns to the riser to mime another similar-sounding song called “To Whom It Concerns.” Members of the crowd get up and stiffly dance alongside him, but it doesn’t do much to add excitement to an unmemorable song.


http://youtu.be/z2iF7URNoGw


Uschi then summons The Remo Four back for another number. This turns out to be a bit of a semi-comedy routine called “But I Was Cool,” which amounts to Tony Ashton coming up in beatnik clothing and hammily blooze-wailing some verses about being ‘cool’ while the band jazzily vamps behind him. While the band sounds pretty good, and it does show some range on their part, it must be said that it’s a little irritating. Although Ashton was a great keyboardist, unfortunately this wouldn’t be the last time he’d deliver a novelty performance on Beat Club that was seemingly a lot funnier to him than it was to anybody else. Even more unfortunately(?), “But I Was Cool” doesn’t seem to be on YouTube.

The remainder of the show is filled by five additional songs from The Lords. The first, “Poor Boy,” finds them channeling their inner Freddie and the Dreamers, continually engaging in a repetitive dance throughout that is so simple as to be borderline retarded (the accompanying song could, to a lesser degree, be described in the same manner). But still, I’m finding myself watching it addictively and giggling, so there’s got to be something there. It’s undeniably entertaining.


http://youtu.be/AUL5dCIqOEg


Even goofier is “I’m a Hog For You Baby,” a semi-raucous rocker that finds them engaging in bizarre squealing noises, even more retarded dancing than before, and one legitimately cool rock freak-out moment during the second guitar solo. Following directly after a brief interview with Gerd, this can generously be judged as the highlight of their set.


http://youtu.be/S1J54W95NEk


The other songs in the Lords’ set include a wincingly stiff take on “Wishin’ and Hopin’” that is painful in a nearly Golden Throats type of way, and a closing combo of “Greensleeves” (performed in a semi-garage fashion while wearing 1700’s styled clothing) and “Boom Boom” (oh God…just…no).


Greensleeves: http://youtu.be/GpVMFHXJFH4

Boom Boom: http://youtu.be/l8h3HZLLXb4


During “Boom Boom,” the closing credits start rolling, bringing the show to a merciful end. The Lords started out as kind of fun, but they sure knew how to wear out their welcome quickly. With me, at least; they’d remain popular in Germany throughout the decade, and would return to Beat Club the following year. Honestly, there were a fair amount of irritating moments in this episode, but there were some good ones too (despite the ridiculous mugging, that Remo Four version of “Peter Gunn” was super cool), and a couple more milestones towards Beat Club developing into its most well-remembered form.


(Edited by halleluwah)

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 15th, 2011 01:48 PM   IP              
QUESTION:

To anybody reading this, should I start just putting up links to the YouTube videos, rather than embedding them into the posts? I like the way the embedded videos look in there myself, but it's also starting to take the page forever to load on my computer, and the problem keeps getting worse as I add more videos. Presumably, if I'm having a problem with the pages being slow, some other people do too (I think I saw Moog saying something about pages with multiple YouTube videos loading slowly for him the other day).

So does anybody mind if I start just putting up links to the videos instead of embedding them?


I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
Jon
The Bubblegum Supremacist

Posts: 9214
Registered: Sep 2007
 Posted August 15th, 2011 01:59 PM   IP              
Holy crap, Uschi Nerke!!!!
I don't know why I ever believed the Chipmunks had the lowdown on punk.
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 15th, 2011 02:02 PM   IP              
Quote:
Jon wrote:
Holy crap, Uschi Nerke!!!!


THAT'S what I should have titled this thread!

:)

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
Matinee Idyll (129)
Camp Counsellor

Posts: 8244
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 15th, 2011 07:57 PM   IP              
Jase, you're doing such a kickass job I'm tempted to make a Beat Club Subforum (along with the Reelin' the Years one) and each show could have a dedicated thread to reduce the loadtimes but keep the embedded vids. It'd be mighty cool, what d'ya think?
"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 15th, 2011 08:04 PM   IP              
If that happened, no one would look at it.
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 15th, 2011 08:31 PM   IP              
Eighty separate threads (hopefully) might be a bit much to wade through, I dunno. And it does seem to be true that the subsection forums get less traffic than the main ones.

I'm thinking about maybe just embedding the really essential videos for each show (the ones I put the asterisks next to in the lists up top), and just offering links to the other ones. Or maybe just making it all links. It doesn't really make that much difference, I guess.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   



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