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.:Why I love Beat Club, and you should too.:.
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The Venerable Gould
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 Posted August 16th, 2011 05:51 AM   IP              
i like the embedded vids myself, and strangely my heap of shit for a computer doesn't seem to be affected so is able to cope with them. but whatever's easier for you - it's your thread!

midway through typing my computer crashed and I had to turn it off and on again. hmm...don't think it's linked to any embedding shenanigans though.
  
Andy B
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 Posted August 16th, 2011 07:13 AM   IP              
Somehow i missed this thread yesterday. Looks amazing. Can't wait to get home and read and check out all the performances. I used to have some of the complete episodes on DVD, though God knows what happned to them.

Beat Club was great though because as much as i enjoy watching and listening to the bands, i love seeing the audience - the clothes the dancing, the general awkwardness when they realise they are being filmed. It somehow gives these clips a realness that promo clips or other TV shows don't always portray.
   
The Venerable Gould
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 Posted August 16th, 2011 08:06 AM   IP              
Quote:
Andy B wrote:

Beat Club was great though because as much as i enjoy watching and listening to the bands, i love seeing the audience - the clothes the dancing, the general awkwardness when they realise they are being filmed. It somehow gives these clips a realness that promo clips or other TV shows don't always portray.



I dunno, plenty of old Top of the Pops clips focussed on the audience too. Like you I love that as much as watching the artists - my favourite clip (er, yes I actually have a favourite clip of this type!) is Mary Hopkin's Temma Harbour which is 90% audience dancing.



Go to about 1 minute and watch the black woman dancing - she realises the camera's on her and she's gonna ignore it....only ten seconds later she cant ignore it. everyone is looking too cool (well, trying to) and she's just like "oh bugger!".
Love this clip. And sorry for deraling the thread!
  
halleluwah
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 Posted August 17th, 2011 04:04 AM   IP              



Beat-Club Episode 5
2/12/1966
All performances live

1. Wilhelm Weibern cold open
2. The Boots - In The Midnight Hour
3. The Tramps - Medley: Just A Little Bit
4. The Tramps – Remember (Walking In the Sand)
5. The Tramps – Gone, Gone, Gone
6. Isabella Bond & The Tramps - Bread And Butter
7. The Boots – Gloria
8. Ian & The Zodiacs - Leave It To Me
9. Ian & The Zodiacs - Why Can't It Be Me*
10. Hit Parader top 10 with Gerd
11. Closing credits (plain black screen, over “In the Midnight Hour”)

(This show originally included The Beatles’ promo films for “Ticket To Ride,” "We Can Work It Out," and "Day Tripper." Also removed was a brief poetry reading at the show's conclusion.)


FULL EPISODE: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4591.html


Beat Club episode five has a strangely regressive, skimpy vibe about it, as if it was filmed around the time of the first episode but was discarded, and then later shown out of sequence. The Hit Parader list proves this not to be the case, but still…watching this one is a weirdly unsatisfying experience compared to the previous shows. Part of the reason for this is that on DVD, the show runs a paltry 22 minutes (each of the previous has been a half hour or slightly over), which admittedly is not the fault of the original production. When originally shown, this episode included three film clips of the Beatles, presented in a similar manner to the Sonny and Cher clip a couple episodes back. However, as with all of the Beatles footage that originally appeared on Beat Club, they have long since been edited out of the episode for presumed legal reasons, so we are left with a shorter-than-usual show.

The thing is, though, even if The Beatles clips were still part of the program, it would still not be the best of episodes. Musically, it’s a return to the mix of straight club band covers and B-level Mersey beat sounds from the earliest shows. After a strange cold open (literally), in which Wilhelm Wiebern appears to be reporting live from the site of a teenage snowball fight (it brings to mind those Kermit the Frog news reports from Sesame Street), we’re immediately introduced to The Boots, a so-so German cover band, playing “In the Midnight Hour.” Musically, it’s okay, but the singer comes off like a non-placing contestant in a John Kay soundalike contest, trying to approximate Wilson Pickett’s gritty intensity by just yelling hoarsely and making awkward hand gestures. It’s not a pretty sight.


http://youtu.be/n6GZlIvu_4Y


After this, Gerd quickly introduces Hamburg’s The Tramps. Although they ostensibly play three songs in their set, The Tramps make quick work of them, joining them into a medley that lasts barely three minutes. They’re a decent dance band, who bizarrely seems to presage the indie penchant for ironic stage wear (two members sport sweatshirts emblazoned with ‘USA Twist Team’). “Just a Little Bit” and the closing “Gone Gone Gone” are both not bad uptempo dance songs, but the fifty seconds of a froggily-sung “Remember (Walking In the Sand)” sandwiched in between just sounds bizarre. Afterwards, they’re joined by singer Isabella Bond, and they back her up on a forgettable rendition of The Newbeats’ “Bread and Butter.” None of The Tramps’ material seems to exist on YouTube.

At this point, The Boots return for another cover band staple, “Gloria.” As with their first song, it’s played fairly well, but the singer still gets on my nerves a bit. At least we get some good shots of their keyboardist, who appears to be Woody Allen in a mop wig.


http://youtu.be/MfWrTo4tjQQ


Ian and the Zodiacs appear next, making them the first repeat performers on Beat Club. They’d only last appeared the previous October, but are a bit less visually Beatles-copying this time around, having traded up to plaid stage suits with black turtlenecks. They are, however, musically following the Fabs into their Help period, with a slight folkiness to the compositions, and frontman Ian Edwards playing a Gibson acoustic guitar with an electric pickup, just like Lennon. “Leave It To Me,” the first of their two songs, is a respectable semi-ballad, not the most memorable of tunes, but pleasant. Cutely, two members of the band play this first song with roses attached to their guitar headstocks; afterwards, they present them to Uschi (smooth move, Ian) and Gerd (er, whatever you’re into, I guess). This performance doesn’t appear to be available on YouTube. Their second song, “Why Can’t It Be Me,” is a bit more uptempo and pretty good. It’s punk-rock short at two minutes, and gets a moderate head of steam going. On most other episodes, it would just come off like another song, but with the relatively slim pickings today, it stands out as the show’s highlight.


http://youtu.be/aoMtbtsirNI


And…only sixteen minutes in, that’s the last musical performance for the day. The remainder of the space in this episode is filled by Gerd stretching the Hit Parader Top 10 countdown out to nearly six minutes in length, a tendency that would last for the next few episodes. In this countdown format, a generous 30 to 45 second clip of each charting song is played as it is mentioned, and then the full list appears onscreen at the end. In keeping with the downbeat nature of this episode, even the UK top 10 that week was relatively lackluster for the period, with a few minor classics padded out with inferior contemporary pop covers by forgotten bands (although it’s salvaged by having Nancy Sinatra’s “These Boots Are Made For Walking” in the top spot). And then, after the countdown is over, Uschi and Gerd just sort of abruptly come on and say goodbye, and the credits roll over a plain black screen.

Or at least, that's how it looks on the DVD; in addition to the Beatles clips, this show originally ended with a German author coming on and reading a brief poem about the current 60s youth culture before the credits rolled. In short, this episode was gutted more than any other in the entire history of Beat Club for the DVD set. It's entirely possible that if the missing footage was restored, the show might have a much greater impact, but as with so many things in this life, legal issues essentially ruined it. Although this episode as it appears on DVD is an unsatisfying experience, all of the Beatles-related footage has been aired on Radio Bremen television in recent years in a special called "The Beatles Beat Club Top 40." Apparently Radio Bremen is allowed to broadcast the footage, but not to sell it as part of their DVD sets. This hurt several shows in the set to varying degrees, but none more than this one. As it is presented here, show five is very possibly the least essential non-retrospective episode in Beat Club's history.


(Edited by halleluwah)

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IanWagner
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 Posted August 17th, 2011 11:20 AM   IP              
NICE!!!!!!!!
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

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 Posted August 20th, 2011 08:31 PM   IP              



Beat-Club Episode 6
3/26/1966
All performances live, except where noted

1. Cold open – Wilhelm Weibern
2. The Spencer Davis Group - Keep On Running* (live on film from International Beat Festival)
3. The Overlanders - Michelle (live on film from International Beat Festival)
4. Twinkle (& The German Blue Flames) - Sha-la-la-la-lee (live on film from International Beat Festival)
5. The Birds And Bees - Shout
6. Eileen - The Boots Are Made For Walking (mimed)
7. The Birds And Bees - Down In The Boon Docks
8. Hit Parader UK Top 10 countdown
9. Sandie Shaw - I Don't Need That Kind Of Lovin’ (mimed) / Sandie exchanges plaques with Uschi and Gerd
10. Sandie Shaw - Tomorrow (mimed)*
11. Closing Credits (Song: “Keep On Running”)

(This program originally included The Beatles' promo films for "I Feel Fine" and "Help!")


FULL EPISODE: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4592.html


The first segment of Beat Club episode six documents performances from the International Beat Festival, held in Bremen in February of 1966. After a cold-open announcement from Wilhelm Weibern, we are immediately taken to footage of the currently very popular Spencer Davis Group, featuring the 17-year-old blue-eyed-soul prodigy Steve Winwood on vocals and fuzz guitar. They play a fine version of their hit “Keep On Running,” although the way it is filmed, with absolutely no crowd in evidence and a casual, guitar tuning intro, I’m not sure that it’s not footage from the soundcheck, rather than the show itself. (Did bands even GET soundchecks back then, by the way?) The remote soundboard audio is well below Beat Club’s usually well-balanced in-studio standards, with a particularly distant guitar presence, but it’s still a good performance, and Winwood’s voice sounds mature far beyond his years. This would be the Spencer Davis Group’s only Beat Club appearance, but Winwood would return two years later with a new band.


http://youtu.be/wcCoaN5q2Pg


The show then makes a quick return to Gerd in the studio, and The Overlanders are introduced. A former British folk group who had recently switched to beat covers, they were briefly a big thing in the UK due to an inexplicably high-charting cover of “Michelle.” Honestly, they’re not that great, and one wonders why this similar but pale cover charted when people still had the far superior Beatles original fresh in their minds. This performance is clearly live at the festival, with wider-angle crowd shots and audible audience noise. The most amusing touch is that this completely benign group is flanked by a wall of Marshall half-stacks on the stage. Also note the large banner behind the stage with the Beat Club logo prominently displayed, a sign of how high the show’s stature had already risen in a mere six months on the air.


http://youtu.be/S4-T-tCvzZc


This is immediately followed by a blonde British pop singer who went only by the name of Twinkle, backed here by the German Blue Flames, last seen pseudo-comically lamenting their involvement in monkey business in episode two. She sings a cover of the Small Faces’ “Sha-La-La-La-Lee” dressed in a silver dress/knee-high boots combo that looks like it was designed for her by Dr. No. She’s a pretty terrible singer, and the band lacks the power of the Small Faces, so it’s not the greatest thing I’ve ever heard musically, but there’s still a decent energy there due to the festival atmosphere that’s fun to watch. This performance is unavailable on YouTube.

From here on out, the rest of this episode is studio-based, and Uschi finally appears to introduce us to The Birds and Bees, a very white group which I think she says are from Birmingham (the English Birmingham, I’d assume…I can’t imagine any band from Alabama displaying this much misunderstanding of basic soul music). I’ve heard some shitty versions of the Isley Brothers’ “Shout” before, but this may be the least soulful/energetic one I’ve ever encountered. I can’t find anything at all about this band on the internet, and I think there’s probably a good reason for that. Moving on!

An interesting performance follows, as a singer known simply as Eileen mimes to a note-for-note cover of Nancy Sinatra’s “These Boots are Made For Walking.” As a multilingual American living in France, she became the go-to performer for recording soundalike versions of Nancy’s hits in French, German, and Italian. Although never a famous performer in her own right, for a time in the mid-60s, Eileen’s re-recordings were as well known as the originals in mainland Europe. Strangely, though, in this performance, she sings the song in English, and it must be said that she does a pretty good job of sounding a lot like Nancy. She does lack a bit of Sinatra’s swagger and personality, which is why I’d never recommend this over the original, but she does an undeniably respectable job of it as an imitator, and she comes across as an engaging, if slightly uncomfortable, performer. Presumably, the Beat Club producers were unable to get Nancy herself to sing the hit on their show, so they settled for the next best thing. Hilariously, every time she sings the chorus, the camera cuts over to a folded pair of go-go boots placed on top of a television set. At the end of the song, she picks them up and throws them directly into the camera, which Gerd seems to find highly amusing.

The Birds and Bees return next for a cover of Billy Joe Royal’s “Down In the Boondocks.” It’s definitely better than their version of “Shout,” but they’re still nothing too impressive. This type of square, unknown-for-good-reason cover band had been a regular feature on Beat Club throughout these early episodes, but the days would be numbered for this type of thing, and The Birds and Bees would never return to the show. Like everything else in the middle section of this episode, this performance is not available anywhere on YouTube. You’re not missing much, trust me.

Gerd then comes on for the top 10 Hit Parader countdown, and again it’s stretched out with long song clips to nearly six minutes. I don’t really mind this time, though, since it’s a much better list overall, featuring such acts as the Beach Boys, Small Faces, Kinks, Yardbirds, and Hollies, and topped by The Walker Brothers’ “The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine Anymore” (amusingly, one of the pictures accompanying this song on the screen is a newspaper clipping whose headline reads ‘Scott Walker: Moody and Over-Emotional.’ Brilliant). Personally, I like these countdown segments, since they’re a sort of fascinating time capsule, but when the charts were having a lackluster week, they could feel gruelingly long.

The final performances of the show are a pair of songs mimed barefoot by British pop star Sandie Shaw. First is “I Don’t Need That Kind of Loving,” a decent pop song which features a similar ska-influenced beat, but a stronger hook, than the Chris Andrews songs from a few episodes back. She makes absolutely no effort to make it look live, by the way, not even bothering to hold a microphone.


http://youtu.be/aAP7cZ0Gd6M


Afterwards, she calls Uschi and Gerd over, and presents them both with plaques from “a very popular European magazine” which voted Beat Club as the #1 pop music television show. Gerd then in turn presents Sandie with a plaque from the same magazine, stating in English that she had been voted “the most popular female girl singer!”

Shaw then finishes with her current UK hit “Tomorrow.” This is a fine, slightly more subdued song with a lovely, flowing melody and a strong vocal performance. Along the way, she gets a guy to come out of the crowd and dance with her, and although her miming is again not stellar, she comes across as very appealing and likeable.


http://youtu.be/D1bsh66WVqE


After an abrupt cut owing to the removal of two Beatles film clips, Uschi and Gerd say goodbye, and the closing credits roll to the tune of “Keep On Running.” This would be Gerhard Augustin’s final moment on Beat Club. After this episode, he was dismissed as co-host of the show he'd had a large hand in creating, leaving Uschi Nerke alone to hold the reigns on-air. No mention is made of it here; apparently, the parting of ways over the next month came as a bit of a shock to Gerd, who understandably assumed that his job was safe. Beat Club was, after all, his show. But increasingly, Mike Leckenbusch was in talks with various English entertainment managers, trying to make deals that would bring higher-profile talent to the show. And he kept hearing the same thing: Beat Club had potential, and they liked the cute girl host just fine, but something had to be done about the nerdy blond guy. Personally, I like Gerd; yes, he had the sex appeal of a lamp post, came off as square and awkward in front of a camera, and regularly made verbal hash out of tasks as simple as reading a damn top 10 list in his native language. By any conventional standard, he was not a strong television host. But dammit, he was legitimately enthusiastic and in love with music, and it showed. And of course, we have him partially to thank for the existence of this show in the first place. But at the same time, if Gerd had stayed on board, a lot of those British managers might have taken a pass on booking their artists to do Beat Club, and the show never would have become what it became. Just as The Beatles might have never taken off into the stratosphere had they not taken the callous step of firing Pete Best on the eve of their stardom, the same is probably true for Beat Club and Gerhard Augustin. Whether or not Mike Leckenbusch pulled a nasty trick on Gerd, the resulting qualitative leap for the show was immediate; within two months, Beat Club would be hosting two of the hottest groups in England on the same episode. It would be a full year before the show would provide Uschi with a new co-host (and you shall rue the day when you first see that guy in action, trust me), but her time hosting solo would likewise allow her to blossom into a more confident and capable television personality.

As for Gerhard Augustin, despite the indignity of getting booted off of his own show, he did alright for himself in the end. After moving to San Francisco and immersing himself into the new psychedelic culture there, he got a job working A&R for Liberty Records. The label shipped him back home, instructing him to comb the German underground rock scene for talent. Three of the bands Augustin would discover and sign would be Can, Amon Duul II, and Popol Vuh, all among the earliest and most important pioneers of the Krautrock movement of the 70s. This means that, in addition to co-creating Germany's most important pop television show, Gerd Augustin was also partially responsible for the development of the country's most notable musical contribution to rock and roll. A strong case could be made that he is the single most important non-musician in German rock history. He may have appeared hopelessly geeky during his time on Beat Club, but in reality Gerd turned out to have been the coolest guy in the room the whole time.


(Edited by halleluwah)

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Jason Penick
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 Posted August 21st, 2011 01:07 PM   IP              
Awesome stuff, J! I'm devouring these clips!


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halleluwah
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 Posted August 21st, 2011 01:23 PM   IP              
Quote:
Jason Penick wrote:
Awesome stuff, J! I'm devouring these clips!
Thanks, Jason!

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halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

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 Posted August 23rd, 2011 02:14 AM   IP              



Beat-Club Episode 7
4/16/1966
All performances live

1. The German Bonds - Sonata Facile (cold open; no opening titles)
2. The German Bonds - We Are Out Of Sight*
3. The Silkie - The Times They Are A-Changin
4. The German Bonds & Tanja May - Don't You Rock Me Daddy-O
5. The German Bonds - Sing Hallelujah*
6. The Silkie – Go Tell It On The Mountain
7. The Silkie - You've Got To Hide Your Love Away
8. Hit Parader Top 10
9. The Pretty Things - Midnight To Six Man*
10. The Pretty Things - Rainin' In My Heart*
11. The Pretty Things – Roadrunner*
12. Closing credits (“Roadrunner” continues and ends)


FULL EPISODE PART ONE: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4593.html
FULL EPISODE PART TWO: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4594.html


Episode seven abruptly cold opens with a close-up of the back of some guy’s head wearing a curly Elizabethan era wig, and he immediately starts playing Mozart’s Piano Sonata #16 (Sonata Facile). Even if you don’t know this one by name, you’ll immediately recognize it; every eight-year-old who’s ever been given piano lessons in the past 200 years has had to play it. After a bit, he tosses off his wig, and the camera pans out to reveal the rest of his band, The German Bonds, who all join in playing a rock version of the piece. (Their actual name was The Bonds, but I guess it’s one of those situations where they had to add a modifier overseas, presumably to avoid confusion with, I don’t know, Gary U.S. Bonds?) Now, I’m not saying this is the first time an instrumental rock arrangement of a famous classical piece had ever been attempted—I’m sure there’s an earlier example somewhere I’m just not aware of—but April 1966 seems pretty damn early for people to be engaging in this type of thing. I’m sure that, without the weight of knowledge of how insufferable this activity would become in the hands of later bands like ELP, this seemed like a fun, harmless little diversionary idea at the time. The band themselves seem to be having fun with it, as the guitarist and bassist stiffly do “proper”-looking dance steps with smirks on their faces throughout.

After this, Uschi (who is looking particularly cute here in her first solo hosting appearance) makes a quick introduction, and The German Bonds launch into their single “We Are Out of Sight.” Here’s where they reveal their true identity as a respectably tough garage band, and it’s one of the better rock performances from Beat Club’s early era. Check out the brief shot at 1:50 of the guitarist’s eyes rolling back into his head as he unleashes a flurry of “Eight Miles High”-esque noise during his solo.


http://youtu.be/dEGuutpk44s


The show proceeds to cruelly throw a cold pail of water onto the viewers’ collective rock boners at this point, as The German Bonds’ set is interrupted by a British folk group named The Silkie, who basically come off as a lily-white, over-earnest UK answer to Peter, Paul, and Mary, but with the addition of some anonymous beatnik-looking bass player who stays off camera most of the time. And of course they open with (sigh) “The Times They Are A-Changin’,” in case you were left with any doubt as to what kind of group they saw themselves as. Trust me, this performance sounds EXACTLY like you’re imagining it right now.

After that unpleasant interruption, The German Bonds resume their set, backing up a female singer named Tanja May on “Don’t You Rock Me, Daddy-O,” a garagey rockabilly song that bears a bit of resemblance to “One After 909.” She’s a decent enough singer who’s better than some of the other guest vocalists bands would have to put up with on this show, but the song itself gets repetitive and a little annoying, with the title being repeated by the band in unison after every single line throughout its duration.

Tanja May leaves the stage, and The Bonds finish up with “Sing Hallelujah.” This frenzied performance of a pretty killer garage track is undoubtedly the highlight of their set, but unfortunately it’s not on YouTube. I’ve got to say, I really like that guitar player/singer guy a lot; he gets rabid every time he takes a solo, no matter how brief it is. Here’s a link to the studio version anyway, just because I think it’s a pretty cool song that you should hear:


http://youtu.be/qjZRzNrgmPM


I like The Bonds quite a bit on this episode, but this would be their only Beat Club appearance. However, the keyboardist and bassist would return, completely transformed, in the early 70s as members of a proto-dark metal band called Lucifer’s Friend, who were also not bad.

Dammit…The Silkie’s coming back on. And as if they hadn’t come across as enough of a stereotype on their first song, they do “Go Tell It On the Mountain.” Because if there’s one group of people you’d expect to really be able to relate of the essential core of an American slavery-era spiritual, it’s a pasty white girl and two pasty white guys who carry their guitars so high up on their chests that it looks like they think they’re holding ukuleles. Plus an anonymous beatnik bassist. And of course, they’re the young, hip generation of folkies, so they follow it with “You’ve Got To Hide Your Love Away.” The girl and the guitar guy closest to the camera trade off verses. Again, picture in your head what you think this would sound like. Yep, that’s it. Sadly, we have The Beatles themselves to partially blame for this; all of them except for Ringo had been involved with producing and arranging The Silkie's version of this song. Yet more proof that secretly, Ringo was really the smartest guy in that band.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60K0r7VQ2G0


Uschi then sits down at a table for her first time reading the Hit Parader Top 10 list; this had previously been Gerd Augustin's feature. It takes up a lot less time this show, since the song clips are excised for all but the top three songs: Bob Lind’s “Elusive Butterfly” (a song which also places at #6 in a cover by Val Doonican), The Spencer Davis Group’s “Somebody Help Me,” and The Walker Brothers’ “The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine Anymore.” Remember that this show was filmed three weeks after the previous one, where the Walker Brothers song was also at #1, and you get an idea of just how big that group was in England in early 1966. They’d get their turn on Beat Club themselves on the next episode.

The main attraction of this episode is saved for the closing spot. The Pretty Things were at this point still in their early, rough r&b phase, and they were still in their commercial prime, with their singles placing on the UK charts. They open with “Midnight to Six Man,” and they sound great, giving a scrappy rave-up performance. Phil May, dressed in a black sweater, comes across as a damn cool frontman, spitting out the lyrics and never opening his eyes the entire time. The thumpy bass is placed a little too high in the mix, but this is a new high-water mark for Beat Club musical performances.


http://youtu.be/rlGk0jDzf6k


The Pretties slow things down a bit for a bluesy “Rainin’ In My Heart, which gives Dick Taylor opportunity for a couple of nice guitar solos. Even on this more subdued song, they’re still playing with a lot of loose, unpolished attitude, as if it was a regular club rather than a TV show taping.


http://youtu.be/cpAHehF3eCg


Uschi comes on and says goodbye, flanked by a group of teenagers and bizarrely, a very old woman as well, announcing that the next show would feature The Hollies and Walker Brothers (the days of exclusively relying on mediocre German club bands for musical guests were clearly coming to an end). The Pretties then start their final number, an amphetamine-supercharged version of “Roadrunner.” The band works themselves into a frenzy (drummer Skip Alan in particular seems like he’s trying to fly off his drum stool), very nearly flying off the rails at a couple of points. It’s not the most together performance you’ll ever hear, but who gives a shit? It’s heavy, intense, crude, and just generally great rock and roll. In case you didn’t know, The Pretty Things were a fucking great band. Their commercial fortunes would start to dwindle not too long after this, but they’d begin to alter their sound and continue to make great records well into the 70s. By the time they would next appear on Beat Club in 1970, they were a very different band indeed. In the meantime, here’s their closing explosion on “Roadrunner.”


http://youtu.be/mZAU3FipLLU


One further parting fact about this episode is that, aside from the filmed festival footage in the previous show, this is the first Beat Club to be entirely filmed in a location different from their normal warehouse-looking TV studio. I’m not sure where it was filmed (I don’t speak German, so if Uschi mentioned it at any point, I didn’t catch it), but it’s a legitimate club somewhere, with a real stage and tables and people smoking and drinking and everything. In the future, the show would do occasional remotes from various locations (most notably for the famous Marquee Club show the following year featuring Hendrix and The Who), but in the meantime this change of location marked yet another step in the show expanding its horizons. Aside from the shitty PBS tote bag-folk section in the middle, episode seven was undoubtedly Beat Club’s best aired up until this point, and the next show would be another winner.


(Edited by halleluwah)

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Matinee Idyll (129)
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 Posted August 23rd, 2011 02:45 AM   IP              
Amazing Pretties performances, don't think I've seen that before (never seen Dick Taylor without a moustache! - I thought he was born with one!).

Can't wait for Hollies and Walker Bros. in the next one. Great work Jason the Unpopular!

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The Venerable Gould
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 Posted August 23rd, 2011 06:02 AM   IP              
That clip of You've Got to Hide Your Love Away should be compulsory viewing for everyone, say those on the Hoffman boards for example, who think that all today's popular music is made by cretins without any talent and who can't write their own material. Cos its one of the shittest things ever. I don't particularly like Bob Dylan and so don't know too much about his history, but it's shite like that that makes me really appreciate him going electric.

Pretty Things were interesting. I can't get over how much of geek Dick Taylor looks like in comparison to Phil May. What are they doing in the same band?!
  
Matinee Idyll (129)
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 Posted August 23rd, 2011 06:07 AM   IP              
Pretty Things were 'interesting'?

They SET THE FUCKING STAGE ON FIRE. Swear to god, why the hell people aren't talking about them on the same level as the Stones I will never understand. I love 'em every bit as much, and on some days, much more.

Don't wanna hijack your thread Jase, but A PRETTY GIRL IS LIKE A MELODY, BUT THE PRETTY THINGS IS LIKE A BIG SOUND!

Ahh, The Dutch, introducing the band while only two of them are on the stage. They tune up, technical issues abound, then at the 2:08 mark, they explode into life and pummel little Dutch children - one of my favourite performances of ever.



(Edited by Matinee Idyll (129))

"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
The Venerable Gould
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 Posted August 23rd, 2011 06:26 AM   IP              
Quote:
Matinee Idyll (129) wrote:
Pretty Things were 'interesting'?


Hey I love the Pretty Things, and those clips were cool and all but they're not the greatest Pretties clips out there. Shit the best clip I've seen of them aint on YouTube anymore. From maybe about 1970 when the drummer goes walk about on stage and does some kind of crazy cymbal solo. Dunno why they took that clip down.
  
halleluwah
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 Posted August 23rd, 2011 01:25 PM   IP              
Quote:
The Venerable Gould wrote:
That clip of You've Got to Hide Your Love Away should be compulsory viewing for everyone, say those on the Hoffman boards for example, who think that all today's popular music is made by cretins without any talent and who can't write their own material. Cos its one of the shittest things ever. I don't particularly like Bob Dylan and so don't know too much about his history, but it's shite like that that makes me really appreciate him going electric.


Hell, I love Bob Dylan, and I still can't stand shit like that. The thing is, to me, American folk music is best when it lets its weird, unpolished, gritty side take charge. When you listen to those old Lomax recordings, or John Jacob Niles or whoever, there's a really high level of weirdness going on. It can be some guy who lived in backwoods Appalachia wailing in falsetto as he picks at some homemade instrument, or somebody engaging in the most guttural shouting possible with no accompaniment at all. That music is amazing, and it's many things, but 'polite' and 'pretty' aren't really among them. That's what I hate about shit like The Silkie and Peter, Paul, and Mary; they took this highly idiosyncratic, unique music with a large amount of reality and roughness, and just slapped layer upon layer of whitewash on top of it, until it became this completely safe, homogenized sound with no teeth whatsoever. So then nice white people from nice suburban homes can listen to it and feel like buying those records is a blow against social injustice or something. A lot of that early-60s folk revival music comes off like that to me.

But that's also one of the things I like about early Bob Dylan; he inherently understood the place that grittiness and weirdness had in folk music, and he adapted it into his own work, rather than trying to hide from it or smooth it over. While everybody else was working at making their sound prettier and more toothless, Dylan actually tried to make his own voice sound uglier. It's not his fault that a whole generation of kids whose parents still cut the crust off of their bread totally misunderstood that and assimilated his songs for their own uses.

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The Venerable Gould
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 Posted August 23rd, 2011 03:25 PM   IP              
I hope I didn't sound like I meant that I thought Dylan's acoustic stuff sounded like Silkie. What I meant was that I don't the full reasons why Dylan went electric, but if it was a move to distance himself from people like Silkie then I full understand his motives. I like the idea of trying to make yourself sound weirder and embracing the ugliness. Hadn't really thought about folk music in those terms, but I can definately see that in the ISB. And also why I prefer Shirley Collins to say Sandy Denny. Not that she tries to sound ugly, but she embraces the fact that she's got a kind of ungainly voice.
  
halleluwah
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 Posted August 23rd, 2011 04:16 PM   IP              
Quote:
The Venerable Gould wrote:
I hope I didn't sound like I meant that I thought Dylan's acoustic stuff sounded like Silkie. What I meant was that I don't the full reasons why Dylan went electric, but if it was a move to distance himself from people like Silkie then I full understand his motives. I like the idea of trying to make yourself sound weirder and embracing the ugliness. Hadn't really thought about folk music in those terms, but I can definately see that in the ISB. And also why I prefer Shirley Collins to say Sandy Denny. Not that she tries to sound ugly, but she embraces the fact that she's got a kind of ungainly voice.
Yeah, I dig. I've always felt like there's a different kind of weirdness in traditional American folk as in British folk (to me, American folk weirdness is more backwoods, like it's made by isolated pockets of people who have never seen other human beings, where the British type seems more mystical and haunted...not to mention often being several hundred years older), but you're totally right that there's just as much of it there, and it's a big part of things like ISB.

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halleluwah
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 Posted August 24th, 2011 04:05 AM   IP              



Beat-Club Episode 8
5/28/1966
All performances live, except where noted

1. Opening park bench credits w/"Rinky Dink" theme music
2. The Remo Four - Peter Gunn
3. The Remo Four - Whatcha Gonna Do About It
4. Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich – Hideaway*
5. Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich - Hold Tight*
6. Graham Bonney - Super Girl (mimed)
7. The Who - Substitute (mimed on film)*
8. The Hollies - Look Through Any Window* / Uschi interviews Graham Nash
9. The Hollies – The Very Last Day*
10. The Hollies - I Can't Let Go*
11. The Remo Four - Rock Candy*
12. Hit Parade Top 10 Countdown
13. The Walker Brothers - Land Of 1000 Dances (mimed)
14. The Walker Brothers - Love Minus Zero/No Limit (mimed)*
15. The Walker Brothers - The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine Anymore (mimed)*
16. Closing Credits (“The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine Anymore” continues)


FULL EPISODE PART ONE: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4595.html
FULL EPISODE PART TWO: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4596.html


Beat Club Episode 8 introduced a few more firsts for the show. For starters, whereas every previous show had clocked in right at around a half an hour apiece, this one lasts for more than 45. The show would return to 30 minutes in the following weeks, but would fluctuate in length from now on, generally settling into a full hour by the end of 1968. This is by far the longest episode of the series so far. Also, this is the first episode of Beat Club to introduce their first proper title sequence, a stop-motion film of a young lady moving to various poses on a park bench, accompanied by an upbeat organ instrumental called "Rinky Dink" by Sounds Incorporated. From the very beginning, this was a show that had played around with its format, sometimes forgoing opening titles altogether. Now, for the first time, they had a standard opening, which would appear on most episodes until the end of 1966.





There’s a playful smash cut from the title screen directly to the hands of Colin Manley of the Remo Four, making their second appearance. And…they open with the same song as they did in their first Beat Club spot, their instrumental rock take on the Peter Gunn Theme. I guess they must have just really liked that song. The ‘look at me’ mugging is still there this time, albeit in slightly less retarded fashion. For some reason, somebody saw fit to place both Remo Four versions of Peter Gunn on YouTube, so here’s this one.


http://youtu.be/DnTZFXBDBDU


The Remos’ next tune is a cover of The Small Faces’ “Whatcha Gonna Do About It,” oversung here by organist Tony Ashton. It’s an alright soul-stomp raver, but the Small Faces’ version was better. Ashton tries to get in on a bit of the lame show-offing, and not to be outdone, Manley proceeds to put his guitar on top of his head and wear it like a hat for the duration of his solo. Sorry to tell you this, buddy, but nobody’s gonna let you get away with that weak level of guitar clowning as soon as Hendrix hits England. Enjoy it while it lasts.

The Remo Four may have been popular recurring guests on Beat Club, but they have nothing on the next group, who inexplicably would become the most frequent guests in the show’s history: Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich. I’m not making this up; DDDBMT (I’ll be damned if I’m going to type that name out in full every time I have to write about them) appeared on a whopping twelve separate episodes of Beat Club—far more than any other artist—and that’s not even counting the fact that after he quit the group, lead singer Dave Dee would go on to co-host the show with Uschi for a brief time in 1969. Yes, somebody at Beat Club obviously had a bit of a hard-on for these guys. If you come at Beat Club thinking of it as a more progressive-leaning pop show, the ubiquity of DDDBMT can be a bit of a headscratcher, but their quirky bubblegum fuzz-pop was very popular with the audiences, and they would become an integral part of the show's history. I personally like them alright (if you’re into Beat Club, you sort of have to, they were on so much), but they increasingly indulged in their novelty side as time went on, and they tend to get kind of annoying and overly-gimmicky to me at that point.

Fortunately, this first performance is possibly their best-ever on the show from a musical standpoint, with the group playing live (this is their only non-mimed Beat Club appearance) and doing a tight, exciting mini-set. “Hideaway,” their first song, starts like it’s gonna be a nasty garage song, but immediately settles into being a pretty nice bubblegum stomper instead. The crowd seems to be getting into it. Good start.


http://youtu.be/lJuZZ9GMwdo


They follow with “Hold Tight,” which is basically a demonstration for how a badass fuzz tone can immediately elevate a mediocre composition into something bordering on great. It’s a pretty average pop tune that doesn’t leave much of an impression on its own, but that guitar player does a good job of making it sound like something dangerous and special. It’s a glorious noise they make here. Again, they have an energetic rapport with the crowd, and they come out of this first appearance very well. We’ll be seeing PLENTY more of this band as the series progresses, trust me.


http://youtu.be/VwODy5xSrcc


After DDDBMT finish their debut set, Uschi makes what as far as I can tell is the first Beat Club mention of the show’s partnership with the BBC and the BFBS (British Forces Broadcasting Service). I’ve tried to research this a bit, but haven’t come up with anything definite yet. I assume it meant that the show would be broadcast on the British mainland and/or on their military bases, but I have found no hard evidence to back this up as of yet. It would certainly make sense; Beat Club seems to be unusually well-known in England and the US for a foreign-language European music show, and it is pretty striking how suddenly this show was able to start obtaining groups that were currently really big stars. I’ll try to find out exactly what the international broadcast schedule was for Beat Club. (If anybody happens to know anything about this, let me know!)

British singer Graham Bonney is up next, miming his single “Super Girl.” Bonney had been the frontman for a minor band called The Riot Squad (incidentally, a later 1967-era version of that band would briefly feature a young David Bowie), but had recently struck out on his own with this song, which was a big European hit. He never really repeated its success, but apparently has released a shit-ton of albums on his own over the past 40 years. This song itself is an alright slab of teen pop, decently-executed but benign overall. He pulls a couple of girls out of the audience to dance with him, and I feel a little sorry for how awkward a couple of them look up there. Bonney would return to Beat Club a year later.


http://youtu.be/-HzdPh0B7ls


This is followed my a momentous occasion: the first appearance of The Who on Beat Club. Technically speaking, they weren’t actually in the building—Uschi just shows the well-known promo clip for “Substitute”—but it’s still great to see The Who enter the story for the first time. More than any other English band (well, except for Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Titch, I guess), The Who would recognize what this show was about, and would return again and again over the next three years. In return, Beat Club would become regular supporters of the band, to the point that in 1969, the bulk of an entire show was dedicated to a celebration of their Tommy album. The Who wouldn’t actually appear live on the program until the beginning of 1967, but the “Substitute” promo acts as a sort of teaser, and is fine watching on its own. It's one of their best early singles, of course, and it’s never not entertaining to watch Keith Moon’s half-assed miming skills in action.


http://youtu.be/eswQl-hcvU0


Next, we’re treated to a set by another highly-regarded English group, The Hollies. The band was enjoying a commercial golden era, in which their singles regularly finished in the UK top 10. They open with “Look Through Any Window,” a track which was already close to a year old at the time, but which still comes across well, as a shimmering piece of folk-pop. The band sounds great here, very tight, with a strong lead vocal and a very good sound balance.


http://youtu.be/COlR2Tj3FnY


Graham Nash then sits down at the front of the stage and is interviewed by Uschi in English (lucky bastard); she then translates his responses to German for the audience. It’s a completely generic 60s pop star interview (how long have you been together/how many hits have you had/etc.), but still manages to be notable as being by far the least annoying Graham Nash interview I’ve ever heard. Even that being the case, Uschi still has to tell him to knock off the funny stuff at one point. He does take great pains at the end to emphasize that the next song The Hollies play, “The Very Last Day,” was currently a #2 hit in Sweden. The apocalypse would seem to be an odd subject matter for a hit single, but I guess they don’t mind it that much in Sweden. The song was originally written by the guys from Peter, Paul, and Mary, and I’m not much interested in hearing their version, but the Hollies' moody, minor-key version here is fairly brilliant. This video features both the interview and song itself.


http://youtu.be/1JTUx1tMXeY


The Hollies finish up with their current UK hit “I Can’t Let Go,” another fine pop song with a great chorus and more shimmering proto-power pop guitar. It would be another year before the Hollies would return to Beat Club, but they made the most of their first appearance on this show.


http://youtu.be/kzGfQ0w16Wo


Strangely, The Remo Four are called back out at this point to play right after the superstars had whipped the crowd into a frenzy (or as close as the German kids ever got to a frenzy, anyway), but they rise to the occasion on a jazzy instrumental called “Rock Candy.” The guitar solo isn’t that amazing, but keyboardist Ashton and drummer Dyke once again prove to be two of the finer musicians around with impressively spirited performances. I’m not usually that into drum solos, but Dyke’s is pretty great here, I’ve got to admit.


http://youtu.be/eg7RetnCwxQ


It’s time for the Hit Parade Top 10 (which now has its own intro card, similar to the park bench theme of the intro). It’s another long, six-minute segment, with every song being given its own long clip, but it’s a hell of a good list, featuring such songs as “Rainy Day Women,” Roy C’s “Shotgun Wedding” (a great soul song banned in many places in the States, but popular overseas), “Monday Monday,” “Sloop John B,” “Strangers In the Night,” and “Wild Thing,” all topped by fucking “Paint It, Black.” That’s an obscene number of classics to be found in a single week’s top ten list. These kids had no idea how lucky they had it.

The climactic top position for this show belongs to the Walker Brothers, the American expatriate trio who were currently riding a white-hot wave of popularity in England. Anybody who knows me well is aware I’m a pretty massive Scott Walker fan in particular, and so the prospect of seeing him giving his only musical performance on Beat Club should be an enticing one. But I’m really not sure they put their best foot forward as a band here. For one thing, they’re miming the whole thing, which wouldn’t be so bad, except that everything else on this show (excepting the Graham Bonney song everybody’s already forgotten about at this point) has been live, and miming just doesn’t quite cut it for getting the crowd’s excitement going in comparison. Further, although all three of the members initially played instruments in the group, singers Scott and John both just hold microphones here. This leaves nonsinging drummer Gary to lamely mime by himself behind a drum set, which looks kind of stupid, as he’s the only person pretending to play anything on stage. And man…you can tell that John in particular just doesn’t know what to do with his hands when he’s not holding a guitar. They open with “Land of 1,000 Dances,” in a fairly soul-free, white version I’ve never been overly fond of in the first place, and throughout, John is doing the strangest, most awkward contortions with his hands you’ll ever see, like he’s been studying all of Mick Jagger’s moves, but not very hard. Scott's mannerisms look a little better, but this is still obviously a supreme mis-match of singer and song, and the whole first song comes off as nothing short of bizarre.


http://youtu.be/cfTKkyWBu6U


Their second song, a pop-ballad arrangement of Bob Dylan’s “Love Minus Zero/No Limit,” appears to be much more in their wheelhouse, if a little over-restrained vocally. But it works well. Amusingly, during the entirety of the guitar solo, the camera by default pans over to Gary, the only instrumentalist on stage, even though he’s only playing the drums (or pretending to, anyway). Notice a weird moment about 48 seconds into this video, where a big guy standing behind Scott pushes a girl away from the stage, and immediately gets into an altercation with a guy who takes umbrage at this.


http://youtu.be/StiXK68Jr8w


Uschi gives a few closing remarks, and the Walker Brothers immediately launch into their recent smash hit “The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine Anymore,” by far their most effective performance on this show. Part of its success here is due to the song itself; to varying degrees, they’d sounded and looked like they were a little uncomfortable in one way or another with both of the previous songs, but this song became their calling card for a simple reason: it’s exactly in line with what they did best. It’s beautiful and melodramatic at the same time, and gave Scott a chance to get both moody and over-emotional on the soaring choruses. He even suddenly looks like he knows exactly how to make his hand gestures seem mysterious, rather than dumb-looking. There’s a damn good reason this song became such a huge hit; it’s simply one of the best pop records of the era.


http://youtu.be/2eAxCVTMJ-I


And that’s it for this installment, which in a way is the first one to really ‘feel’ like a classic Beat Club episode. Obviously, there was a focus on big name pop acts, but aside from that, the greater length and the fact that they’d bothered to finally include a title sequence meant that overall the show had a more substantial, professional feel about it than it ever had before. As if to underline just how heady the current days were becoming, the next installment found Beat Club intentionally looking backward for the first time.



(Edited by halleluwah)

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The Venerable Gould
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 Posted August 24th, 2011 05:44 AM   IP              
Quote:
halleluwah wrote:
Yeah, I dig. I've always felt like there's a different kind of weirdness in traditional American folk as in British folk (to me, American folk weirdness is more backwoods, like it's made by isolated pockets of people who have never seen other human beings, where the British type seems more mystical and haunted...not to mention often being several hundred years older), but you're totally right that there's just as much of it there, and it's a big part of things like ISB.


Well its interesting you say that, as I'd probably expect American folk to be more about isolation than British folk just because of the size of the country. But in the sleeve notes of Shirley and Dolly Collins' Love, Death & The Lady she's talking about the song The Outlandish Knight and she's talking about the origin of the word outlandish. She talks about how some old woman she knew couldn't marry a bloke
in her youth because he was too outlandish. And all she meant was that he came from the next village, meaning that back in the day despite the small size of our little country, there were still pockets of isolation where villages kept themselves to themselves. I think that explains a lot about the "mysticalness" (is that a word?) of British folk - it's made by backwards bumpkins who didn't experience the wider world.

But anyway, I shall now read your next installment!
  
Matinee Idyll (129)
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 Posted August 24th, 2011 06:51 AM   IP              
Hey cool! That 'I Cant Let Go' clip is my favourite Hollies footage, had no idea it was on Beat Club (which before this thread I had assumed was only mimed performances).

Man, they're killing those harmonies... what a great live performance. To see Tony on an acoustic 12-string, and STILL nailing those difficult Look Through Any Window parts. Pure class.

Up to the Walker Bros. clips now.

"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
Matinee Idyll (129)
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 Posted August 24th, 2011 06:59 AM   IP              
"Notice a weird moment about 48 seconds into this video, where a big guy standing behind Scott pushes a girl away from the stage, and immediately gets into an altercation with a guy who takes umbrage at this."

Haha, brilliant - WOT THE HELL!?

"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
Andy B
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 Posted August 24th, 2011 08:22 AM   IP              
Quote:
halleluwah wrote:
Hell, I love Bob Dylan, and I still can't stand shit like that. The thing is, to me, American folk music is best when it lets its weird, unpolished, gritty side take charge. When you listen to those old Lomax recordings, or John Jacob Niles or whoever, there's a really high level of weirdness going on. It can be some guy who lived in backwoods Appalachia wailing in falsetto as he picks at some homemade instrument, or somebody engaging in the most guttural shouting possible with no accompaniment at all. That music is amazing, and it's many things, but 'polite' and 'pretty' aren't really among them. That's what I hate about shit like The Silkie and Peter, Paul, and Mary; they took this highly idiosyncratic, unique music with a large amount of reality and roughness, and just slapped layer upon layer of whitewash on top of it, until it became this completely safe, homogenized sound with no teeth whatsoever. So then nice white people from nice suburban homes can listen to it and feel like buying those records is a blow against social injustice or something. A lot of that early-60s folk revival music comes off like that to me.

But that's also one of the things I like about early Bob Dylan; he inherently understood the place that grittiness and weirdness had in folk music, and he adapted it into his own work, rather than trying to hide from it or smooth it over. While everybody else was working at making their sound prettier and more toothless, Dylan actually tried to make his own voice sound uglier. It's not his fault that a whole generation of kids whose parents still cut the crust off of their bread totally misunderstood that and assimilated his songs for their own uses.


Totally agree with you. I guess it happens to all musical forms - they start off primitive and wild, then as more people start to play and listen to the music, the more it's original form gets diluted and twisted into something else entirely, so that although it's sounds familiar it has actually become far removed from the original source.

The only thing is, that becasue musical genres are now so widely spread across the world and each genre is played by millions of people, it seems that authenticity becomes the most valued thing, and the goal is often to sound as close to some of these original forms as possible - something that seems to have happened especially with folk music, with hundreds of bands and singers trying to be all old and mystical and weird sounding just to fit in with this expectation and almost hip coolness that applauds this false authenticity. What they forget is that the old records and singers were genuinely weird and mystical because they couldn't be anything else- they were just products of the times, who they were and where they came from. A lot of the new singers and bands seem to have forgetten this and choose to be something that they are not.

I'd much rather someone sing a folk song in their own voice rather someone elses.

Sorry about the ramble.

This a great thread with some amazing write ups - just need to get home a watch the clips as Youtube is banned at work
   
halleluwah
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 Posted August 24th, 2011 01:33 PM   IP              
Quote:
Matinee Idyll (129) wrote:
Hey cool! That 'I Cant Let Go' clip is my favourite Hollies footage, had no idea it was on Beat Club (which before this thread I had assumed was only mimed performances).

Man, they're killing those harmonies... what a great live performance. To see Tony on an acoustic 12-string, and STILL nailing those difficult Look Through Any Window parts. Pure class.

Up to the Walker Bros. clips now.


I've got to say, their set in this show is what made me start digging The Hollies. I liked them before, but had never taken special notice of them above and beyond a lot of other bands. They sound really damn good on their three songs on this show, though, and it's a well-chosen trio of songs. They are clearly playing to their own strengths, and it shows. Compare that with how the Walker Brothers, a group I already was a fan of, come across on this show. They take like a song and a half to start looking comfortable at all up there, and only their last song totally works. In a head-to-head match-up of two of the biggest pop groups in England at the time, the one I was less familiar with completely trounced the one I already dug, and that's what made me sit up and start taking special note of The Hollies for the first time.


Quote:
"Notice a weird moment about 48 seconds into this video, where a big guy standing behind Scott pushes a girl away from the stage, and immediately gets into an altercation with a guy who takes umbrage at this."

Haha, brilliant - WOT THE HELL!?


Yeah, I can't figure out if that guy back there was security, or the Walker Brothers' road manager, or what. But that girl was just sort of standing there when he pushed her; it's not like she was rushing the stage or anything. It's weird that they used that camera angle for the broadcast version of that bit; you'd think they wouldn't exactly want to highlight that type of incident on their set.

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halleluwah
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 Posted August 24th, 2011 01:35 PM   IP              
Quote:
Andy B wrote:

The only thing is, that becasue musical genres are now so widely spread across the world and each genre is played by millions of people, it seems that authenticity becomes the most valued thing, and the goal is often to sound as close to some of these original forms as possible - something that seems to have happened especially with folk music, with hundreds of bands and singers trying to be all old and mystical and weird sounding just to fit in with this expectation and almost hip coolness that applauds this false authenticity. What they forget is that the old records and singers were genuinely weird and mystical because they couldn't be anything else- they were just products of the times, who they were and where they came from. A lot of the new singers and bands seem to have forgetten this and choose to be something that they are not.



Totally true...forced 'authenticity' isn't really authenticity at all. You can't just capture that folk weirdness in a bottle and spit it back out at people and expect it to be the same.

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halleluwah
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 Posted August 24th, 2011 03:50 PM   IP              
Beat-Club Episode 9
6/18/1966
All performances from previous Beat Club shows

1. The Yankees - Halbstark (Show 1)
2. The Overlanders - Michelle (Show 6)
3. Chris Andrews - To Whom lt Concerns (Show 4)
4. Liverbirds - Bo Diddley Daddy (Show 1)
5. The Lords - Poor Boy (Show 4)
6. The Rattles - Come On and Sing (Show 3)
7. Eileen - These Boots Are Made for Walkin' (Show 6)
8. Sandie Shaw - I Don't Need That Kind Of Lovin' (Show 6)
9. Graham Bonney - Super Girl (Show 8)
10. The Beatles - Rain (on film)
11. The Beatles - Paperback Writer (on film)


Only nine months into its seven-year run, Beat Club had already covered enough ground to warrant compiling a retrospective clips show. Although I have been able to find a probable list of what was included in the show (see above), the people who compiled my complete Beat Club set chose not to include this episode, as all the clips except for The Beatles films are available elsewhere on the set already. Looking down that list, it's noticeable that most of the big stars who had appeared on Beat Club so far are missing...no Walker Brothers, Hollies, Petty Things, or Gerry and the Pacemakers to be found here, with only Sandie Shaw standing as a somewhat 'big' name at the time. Mostly, the clips offer a glimpse at an era on the show that already seemed much longer ago than it really was. After just having seen two of the most popular pop groups in England on the show the week before, returning to the modesty of those Yankees and Liverbirds clips from the first show already seems nearly alien now.

This show offered a bit of a summary on the earliest era of Beat Club, where it still hewed fairly closely to what Gerd Augustin and Mike Leckenbush had in mind when he initially created it. But they'd already moved past this era, and there was no going back now. When Beat Club returned to shooting new episodes for their July 1966 show, there would be no huge stars present. Episode ten would, however, become known as one of the most notable shows in the entire series, preserving some of the only existing footage of one of the most notorious cult bands of the 60s.


(Edited by halleluwah)

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IanWagner
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 Posted August 24th, 2011 04:12 PM   IP              
Nice stuff!! Nice rundown of episode 8.
Few things, though:
Have u seen Tarantino's film Death Proof? Dave Dee's Hold Tight was used in a very memorable scene in that film, and has become a type of instant classic after that. I have even heard it several times in Rite Aid.
Gotta say, Very Last Day is one of my very favorite Hollies recordings, I think one of their most inspired revisions, much better than their version of I Can't Let Go (have you heard the original by Evie Sands?).
Anyway, great stuff as always.

   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 24th, 2011 04:33 PM   IP              
I haven't seen Death Proof, but I kept finding references to it when I was doing research last night for that part of the write up. That song does totally seem like a perfect type of Tarantino-revival record, like "Little Green Bag" was. It's got that vibe of being total bubblegum, but kind of threatening at the same time, that musically goes right in line with his trip.

I've not heard the original Evie Sands version of I Can't Let Go, or the original of Very Last Day either. I imagine the original version of the former is probably way better than the latter.

Thanks for reading!

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 26th, 2011 03:30 AM   IP              



Beat-Club Episode 10
7/16/1966
All performances live, except where noted

1. Opening titles (park bench)
2. Monks - Boys Are Boys and Girls Are Choice*
3. The Image - Red Rubber Ball
4. Sandy Sarjeant - Can't Stop The Want (mimed)
5. Country Stars - Orange Blossom Special
6. Country Stars - Busted
7. Country Stars - Folsom Prison Blues
8. Monks - Monk Chant*
9. Monks - Oh, How To Do Now*
10. Neil Christian - That's Nice (mimed)
11. Hit Parade Top 10
12. Sonny & Cher - What Now My Love (mimed on film)*
13. Closing credits (new park bench graphics)


FULL EPISODE PART 1: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4597.html
FULL EPISODE PART 2: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4598.html


First off, I’m happy to announce that I’ve found a video of the Beat Club park bench title sequence. Here you go:


http://youtu.be/mMUhChPggCs


When one thinks of the most notable musical performances in Beat Club history, it’s generally the better-known bands who come to mind first. A drunken Alice Cooper haphazardly tossing lines from “American Pie” into “I’m Eighteen;” a pilgrim-hatted Richie Blackmore dementedly slapping his guitar strings during a half-written early version of “Higway Star;” Keith Moon pulling goony faces as he mimes the woodblock part of “Magic Bus.” If you’re any kind of serious fan of that era of rock music, chances are at some point you’ve seen these clips. Beat Club also played host to numerous lesser-known bands, many of whom are essentially forgotten today. But on a select few occasions, the show featured a musical act who may not have been considered any kind of a big deal at the time, but whose status has only risen over the years, to the point that today, to a select cult, they’re almost mythical, and any footage that exists at all has to be considered valuable and painfully rare. In the “I can’t believe this exists” category, tonight’s Beat Club installment surely ranks among the most notable episode in the history of the show, since it features three uncut live performances by The Monks.

That’s not a name that means much to most of the general public, but to certain segments of music snobs, or to those with a taste for more bizarre, ‘outsider’ music, these guys are legendary. A quintet of American soldiers who were stationed in Germany, The Monks had began as a fairly straightforward rock and roll cover band, but something went terribly off-script somewhere along the way, and by 1965, they’d transformed themselves into a band so strange and exisistentially artsy that even GERMAN PEOPLE didn’t quite know what to make of them. They shaved their heads into monks’ tonsures. They wore all black, except for a length of rope tied around their necks like a noose that each of them wore as a tie. Mostly, though, they just didn’t sound like any other band that’s ever existed. Their opening performance on Beat Club episode ten (coming directly after the new park-bench opening sequence) gives a good indication of the sheer weirdness of their sound.

At only about 80 seconds in length, “Boys Are Boys and Girls Are Choice” is still enough to prove both highly unsettling and obnoxiously catchy. Built upon an upbeat cabaret rhythm and carnival organ (sounding not entirely unlike The Doors), along with thick fuzz bass and heavily strummed banjo, it’s essentially a short incantation of the title, chanted repeatedly by the group, and interrupted only by a maniacally unhinged organ solo and a brief, off-key bridge about halfway through. And…that’s it. It’s all very jovial and memorable, but it’s also so fucking weird that, well, it’s hard to believe these guys aren’t really German. The Monks would return for a couple tracks later on in the show, but for the time being, we have other, somewhat less interesting, bands to examine.


http://youtu.be/LJTGimyf0r8


It wasn’t just The Monks who were starting to take Beat Club into an artsier direction; to my eyes, this is the first episode where you can see faint glimmers of the more jagged, jump-cut editing style that would become a hallmark of the show. Of course, it’s pretty tame here compared to the extremes they’d go with it later, but it’s noticeable that the cuts between Uschi and the musicians (and back) have suddenly become quicker and less predictable. After showing a few strange black-and-white pictures of television sets and equipment set up on a beach, Uschi introduces our next band, The Image. A British pop band which supposedly featured a young Dave Edmunds on guitar at one point (he’s not playing with them here, though), they play a version of Paul Simon’s “Red Rubber Ball,” recently a hit for U.S. band The Cyrcle. It’s decent but unadventurous, and the vocal harmonies don’t seem to be as together as they should be.


http://youtu.be/yZ1xqKH4OI0


Next up is the Beat Club debut of Sandy Sarjeant. A British dancer, best-known for her regular appearances on Ready, Steady, Go! (and the future Mrs. Ian McLagan for a short time in the late 60s, by the way), Sandy would return to Beat Club often, particularly after RSG ended in 1967. Unfortunately, while she was heavily influential as a go-go dancer on television (everybody wanted to copy her moves), her singing career never took off as such, primarily because, frankly, her voice wasn’t all that great. At present, she mimes Graham Bonney’s “Can’t Stop the Want,” an okay song whose breathy vocal is meant to accentuate her sexiness, although I’m not sure her conservative outfit is working much in her favor here. She’d return the next year to perform this song again, in a manner that comes much closer to achieving her aims.


http://youtu.be/kD7rrKqeRl0


Okay, in their own way, the next band on is damn near as weird as The Monks. Essentially, it’s a straight-up German country band, full of heavily Aryan-looking guys all dressed in identical western shirts, like they’re ready for the Grand Old Opry, save for the thick accents you can hear when they sing. Their drummer has an old Texas license plate hanging down from his snare drum. They come bearing the supremely generic (and nearly impossible to properly Google) title The Country Stars, and they open with a fiddle-led instrumental version of “Orange Blossom Special” that is actually kind of respectable. They can at the very least play their instruments fairly well. I’m very sorry to report that none of the Country Stars’ three songs is available on YouTube. This is a real shame; I think everybody should be forced to watch this stuff at least once.

Uschi introduces the band members (speaking to them briefly about “hilly-billy” music), and then The Country Stars continue with versions of Harlan Howard’s “Busted” (popularized by Johnny Cash) and Cash’s own “Folsom Prison Blues.” Both of these come off as fucking strange. “Busted” is sung by a very short but cute girl who wears a fringe jacket and sings incredibly stiffly due to her thick German accent. I can’t say this performance is good, per se, but there’s something so bizarre about hearing her trying so earnestly to pull off these lines about babies with no shoes and cows in the fields getting ready to die that it’s impossible to take your eyes off of it. “Folsom Prison Blues” is fucking annoying, though, as one of the other male guitarists takes over the vocal, and he’s made the unfortunate decision to attempt a full-on Johnny Cash impression, which betrays his own accent about once every fifth word or so. He even has his hair styled into the trademark Cash pompadour. I’m just going to say there’s a reason you never hear about any German country music stars and leave it at that. What the fuck.

After that detour into the outer reaches of sanity, it’s a perfect time for the return of The Monks. They launch into “Monk Chant,” by wide margin the farthest-out performance Beat Club had yet featured on their show. It starts with a tribal drumbeat tied to a simple fuzz bass riff, while the other three band members all bang away at giant tambourines and engage in wordless unison vocal exhortations. Then we move into another wild organ solo, and all the free band members walk over to a guitar that’s been placed on the ground, bending over to tap it and do whatever they can to make weird noises on it. As they all return to their initial positions to restate the song’s “theme,” the camera pans over to the dancefloor, where the kids are making a valiant attempt to continue to get down throughout all of this. Again, all of this has transpired in only two minutes.


http://youtu.be/hXUjo7zcifQ


For The Monks’ third and final song, “Oh, How To Do Now,” they start off with a fairly straightforward soul-pop rhythmic groove, but things get strange almost immediately as the entirely straight/non-swinging guitar/banjo stabs enter the picture. The band again chants the title in unison, over which guitarist Gary Burger offers a bit of crazy pleading on the verse (along with a series of facial contortions that come off as almost demented in their extreme jolliness). I guess this is the closest The Monks come to a ‘standard’ sounding song on here, but they’re still churning it out in such a mechanical, metronomic way that they come off a lot more like a proto-krautrock band than a group meant for mid-60s teens to dance to. As the band obsessively repeats the title phrase, the key shifts up, and Burger turns his back to the crowd to get some guttural feedback out of his amp (unfortunately, it seems Beat Club’s sound engineers turned the guitar channel way down to avoid red-lining at this point, so we don’t get the full effect). The final shot of this song, as the band robotically hammers home the ending, while the crowd of teenagers who have no fucking idea what they’re hearing attempt to dance to it, is one of the most surreal and indelible images in Beat Club’s history to me.


http://youtu.be/hBqXXmPqyoA


If it seems like I might be making too big a deal out of only seven minutes of music played by a band most people have never heard of, keep in mind the sorry state of film in existence for most cult bands of the 60s. Even some of the relatively better-known cult acts, like the Velvet Underground, The Stooges, or Silver Apples, have next to no footage in existence; certainly no footage that includes full song performances shot from multiple angles. When placed in that context, the very fact that this performance exists is little short of miraculous. (You know something even MORE miraculous? A bit later, The Monks also appeared on Beat Club’s rival German pop show which had recently sprung up, Beat! Beat! Beat!, and that performance still exists as well. If you were going to be a cult band in the 60s, Germany was definitely the place to do it, it seems.) Also, it’s worth noting that The Monks’ performance on Beat Club was a milestone for the show itself; in its ‘progressive’ era of the early 70s, bands who thrived on experimentalism at the risk of possibly alienating the show’s audience would be commonplace. This was entirely new ground in 1966, though, when nothing even approaching being so brazenly uncommercial had yet been featured. The Monks were in some ways unheralded trailblazers, pointing the way towards the type of unbridled musical freedom that the show itself wouldn’t fully embrace for another four years.

The rest of this episode is a bit mundane in the wake of the craziness we just saw, and retreats straight for the conventional with Neil Christian’s “That’s Nice.” Christian is a bit of a footnote these days, primarily remembered by most rock fans today as the guy who gave Jimmy Page his first steady paying gig in the early 60s. But he did manage a #16 hit in 1966 with this song, his only entry into the charts. Honestly, this song kind of sucks, and he comes across as more smarmy than sexy as he (poorly) mimes it directly to the female members of the crowd, so let’s move on, shall we?


http://youtu.be/NiOnfq1hewk


Next we have the Hit Parade Top 10 list, cut down to a more manageable length due to the shortening of the song clips. It was another pretty good week on the charts, with The Kinks’ “Sunny Afternoon” topping, and songs like “River Deep-Mountain High,” “Bus Stop,” “Paperback Writer,” and “Strangers In the Night” bubbling under.

Following the Top 10, Uschi signs off, giving a little teaser about the artists to be featured on the next program, and proceeds to introduce a clip of Sonny and Cher miming “What Now My Love” on some other TV show. This isn’t one of their better-remembered hits today, but it’s a pretty good one. Interestingly, the clips of this performance available on YouTube are both from this Beat Club episode (you can tell by the TV screen fade in during the intro), rather than whatever original show it was aired on. It’s entirely possible the original tapes of that program were wiped, and this clip only still exists now due to its re-broadcast on Beat Club. As soon as the song is over, a new end credit sequence plays, mirroring the opening titles.


http://youtu.be/ZjDrTfa6GkM


Aside from the film clip of Sonny and Cher, seemingly tossed in as an afterthought at the end, there weren’t any big stars featured on this show, but what it did offer was the first taste of the avant-garde nature that would increasingly become a major part of Beat Club’s makeup towards the end of the decade. Both as a valuable historical document of one of the more original bands of the era, and as a further step towards maturity for Beat Club itself, this episode is a fascinating one.


(Edited by halleluwah)

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 26th, 2011 11:35 AM   IP              
That is one of the best things I've read. Can't believe I am the first to respond!. Those Monks clips never fail to do the job for me.
   
Jon
The Bubblegum Supremacist

Posts: 9214
Registered: Sep 2007
 Posted August 26th, 2011 11:42 AM   IP              
SECONDED -- great writing, and EVERYBODY needs to check out those Monks clips. You're absolutely right about their importance. They're a batshit crazy band and if you've not heard them, you're in for both a surprise and a treat.
I don't know why I ever believed the Chipmunks had the lowdown on punk.
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 26th, 2011 01:15 PM   IP              
Thank you both!

I was hoping you'd get in on the Monks show here, Jon; I'm always knocked out by your Gary Burger stories, which are very cool.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   



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