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.:Why I love Beat Club, and you should too.:.
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OMAR
Proud To Be Contarded

Posts: 508
Registered: Feb 2010
 Posted August 26th, 2011 01:26 PM   IP              
Jason - love this thread!!!

Interesting side note pertaining to Dylan & The Silkie -
Episode is marked as 4/16/66 - don't know if that's airdate or recorded date.
But the Silkie were obviously on Bob's & John Lennon's mind on 5/27/66 when they were filmed for EAT THE DOCUMENT.

***
Dylan: Haha! Tell me about The Silkies.

Lennon: Naw. We've missed all the good 'uns.

Dylan: Tell me about this pain in my side.

Lennon: Why don't you take something?

Dylan: I've taken a few milligrams of Silkie once.
***

The Silkie had covered Bob's song, but they were managed by Beatles' manager Brian Epstein. Bob, jokingly, is sticking it to John (as if John were responsible by proxy) about this group being associated with The Beatles. Also, Bob was legendary for consistently having a negative view of people's covers of his songs, so this fits too.
   
Jon
The Bubblegum Supremacist

Posts: 9214
Registered: Sep 2007
 Posted August 26th, 2011 01:27 PM   IP              
One interesting Gary factoid is that he was DEFINITELY friends with a lotta the krautrock groups from back then -- he still keeps in touch with the guys from Faust, for example, and he told me he knew a lot of the Can guys too. The Monks were without a question an influence on those groups in the 70s -- the repetition, the brutal attack, the hookless/wordless vocals, etc.
I don't know why I ever believed the Chipmunks had the lowdown on punk.
   
seymour
Tiger Beat Centerfold

Posts: 2114
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 26th, 2011 01:34 PM   IP              
Wow, I'm going to have some fun with this this weekend. Thanks !
They call me Dr. Beep.
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 26th, 2011 01:37 PM   IP              
Quote:
OMAR wrote:
Jason - love this thread!!!

Interesting side note pertaining to Dylan & The Silkie -
Episode is marked as 4/16/66 - don't know if that's airdate or recorded date.
But the Silkie were obviously on Bob's & John Lennon's mind on 5/27/66 when they were filmed for EAT THE DOCUMENT.

***
Dylan: Haha! Tell me about The Silkies.

Lennon: Naw. We've missed all the good 'uns.

Dylan: Tell me about this pain in my side.

Lennon: Why don't you take something?

Dylan: I've taken a few milligrams of Silkie once.
***

The Silkie had covered Bob's song, but they were managed by Beatles' manager Brian Epstein. Bob, jokingly, is sticking it to John (as if John were responsible by proxy) about this group being associated with The Beatles. Also, Bob was legendary for consistently having a negative view of people's covers of his songs, so this fits too.


Oh man, that's badass. And I thought I might be coming off as too harsh on that band...just knowing that Dylan was aware enough of them to bother to spit bile in their direction basically lets me off the hook. There's no way I can ever top that guy at that game.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 26th, 2011 01:42 PM   IP              
Quote:
Jon wrote:
One interesting Gary factoid is that he was DEFINITELY friends with a lotta the krautrock groups from back then -- he still keeps in touch with the guys from Faust, for example, and he told me he knew a lot of the Can guys too. The Monks were without a question an influence on those groups in the 70s -- the repetition, the brutal attack, the hookless/wordless vocals, etc.
See, that's what I'm talking about. Amazing. I do know that with some of those Krautrock bands were essentially made up of avant-garde or jazz musicians who didn't become interested in rock until they started to hear some of the more adventurous acts (Hendrix, the Velvets, etc). I've always wondered whether there was much of a direct link involving the Monks to that particular stew, but what you said makes it sound like there definitely was. That's awesome.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
OMAR
Proud To Be Contarded

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Registered: Feb 2010
 Posted August 26th, 2011 01:57 PM   IP              
On April 16, 1966 Bob was on tour in Australia.
Quite possible that Bob, post-gig back at the hotel, had to endure watching the Silkie on TV.
   
OMAR
Proud To Be Contarded

Posts: 508
Registered: Feb 2010
 Posted August 29th, 2011 11:49 AM   IP              
I'd like to ask a tangential question at this point:

at what point did pop-music-showcase shows like this begin to peak?
and to what would you attribute the reason for such shows peaking?
(I have my own theory or two.)
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 29th, 2011 02:59 PM   IP              
Quote:
OMAR wrote:
I'd like to ask a tangential question at this point:

at what point did pop-music-showcase shows like this begin to peak?
and to what would you attribute the reason for such shows peaking?
(I have my own theory or two.)


I'm not sure I can fully answer that, since I'm more a straight-up Beat Club enthusiast than I am any kind of expert on the state of pop music television in general. But from what I do know, it seems to me that the rapid proliferation of pop music TV shows happened in response to the effect Beatlemania had on the pop scene in general. Just based on a cursory glance at Wikipedia, it looks to me like 1965 or so might have been a peak year; surprisingly, both Hullaballoo and Shindig only were on the air for a little over a year apiece, straddled over '65 and '66. And in Britain, who got Beatlemania before we did, Top of the Pops and Ready Steady Go debuted a year or so earlier. (Interestingly, RSG ended at the end of 1966 as well.) I don't really know why a number of the most remembered shows all ended around the same time in 1966; perhaps a lot of them couldn't figure out a way to adapt to the changes in musical styles/bigger production techniques/psychedelic visual presentation.

That's one of the things I find most interesting about Beat Club, actually; they got into the game a little later than a lot of other shows, but they were able to find a way to continually evolve their show alongside the musical trends of the day. When music got trippier and more concerned with production gimmicks, so did they. When the progressive, high-minded attitude took over pop music, Beat Club followed it there as well.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
OMAR
Proud To Be Contarded

Posts: 508
Registered: Feb 2010
 Posted August 29th, 2011 03:09 PM   IP              
Good points, Jason.

Plus also:
there's probably a correlation to the downfall of these types of shows to the (perhaps) apparent lack of dance music put out there. (Of course, there's an argument that loads of Beatles, Who, and others' music were not dance-y either.)
Probably has to do with the drug culture kicking in too. When you're stoned out of your gourd, you don't necessarily want to stand up & move about. And dancing to The Stones' "The Lantern" is pretty darn difficult. ;-)
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted August 30th, 2011 04:27 AM   IP              
Beat-Club Episode 11
8/27/1966
All performances live from the Tiles Club, London

1. Sounds Incorporated - Rinky Dink (cold open)
2. Sounds Incorporated – Fingertips
3. Sounds Incorporated - Little Red Book*
4. Uschi gives a tour of the Tiles Club
5. Cliff Bennett & His Rebel Rousers - Hold On, I'm Coming
6. Cliff Bennett & His Rebel Rousers - Got To Get You Into My Life
7. The Moody Blues - Bye Bye Bird
8. The Moody Blues - Really Haven't Got The Time*
9. Uschi talks to a bartender named Barbara
10. Shape And Sizes - A Little Lovin' Somethin'*
11. The Washinton DC's - 32nd Floor

(This episode originally included the promo clips for "Rain" and "Paperback Writer" by The Beatles.)


FULL EPISODE PART 1: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4599.html
FULL EPISODE PART 2: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4600.html


Beat Club’s second foray into an on-location episode shoot took them to London (you can tell by the subtle hints found in the cold-open montage of photos showing Big Ben and double-decker buses), for a set of performances in the Tiles Club. The first band featured is the instrumental combo Sounds Incorporated, who had enjoyed a solid career with a few minor hits, as well as having backed musicians such as Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Sam Cooke on U.K. tours. They’d even opened for the Beatles on a U.S. tour, including the famous 1965 Shea Stadium show. And more to the point here, they were also the band who performed the current organ-led Beat Club theme song, titled “Rinky Dink.” They open the show with a live version of this upbeat theme, extended to allow several band members instrumental solos. These guys were a pretty tight group of musicians.


http://youtu.be/Y9inRs2oQ0s


Uschi then greets the audience and introduces her co-host for the evening, the Tiles Club’s house DJ, a not-as-cool-as-he-thinks-he-is guy in sunglasses named Clem (I think that's what Uschi calls him, anyway). He strangely gives her a pair of reading glasses to put on, and introduces Sounds Incorporated’s next tune, a cover of Stevie Wonder’s “Fingertips.” Instrumentally, this isn’t a bad performance, with some awesome breakbeats from future Jeff Beck Group drummer Tony Newman. Unfortunately, it’s a bit spoiled by the frontman efforts of one of the saxophonists, who misinterprets Stevie’s exuberantly youthful exhortations on the original by turning it into a mess of shrill, obnoxious caterwauling and idiotic dancing. Sad.


http://youtu.be/q1NPPBqQhM4


Sounds’ last song is an instrumental take on Bacharach’s “My Little Red Book” which I like a lot. They navigate the changes well, and offer up a small wall of sound with their dynamic arrangement featuring one of the saxophonists doubling on flute. Again, drummer Newman shines here. It’s probably the musical highlight of the show for me.


http://youtu.be/kqeXN3N3zyI



Uschi then takes a minute to have a camera follow her around to a few boutiques surrounding the club on Tiles Street, selling clothing, jewelry, and handbags; it’s an interesting little slice-of-swinging London moment that ends with her introducing our next band, Cliff Bennett and the Rebel Rousers. This was another band with Beatles ties, being managed by Brian Epstein and scoring a top 10 British hit version of “Got to Get You Into My Life.” However, all this easily pales in comparison to what Bennett would go on to accomplish in the early 70s as frontman for the legendary megagroup Toe Fat. So you KNOW you’re in for a treat here.

The band, dressed in hilarious plaid jackets, opens with a cover of Sam and Dave’s “Hold On, I’m Comin’.” It’s understandably more tepid instrumentally than the M.G.s’ playing on the original, while Bennett himself spends the time bloozily proving that under no circumstances is he an adequate substitute for either Sam OR Dave. Still…I’ve heard worse.


http://youtu.be/8NKOdIJP8MQ


They follow with their hit version of “Got To Get You Into My Life,” which isn’t too bad, mainly because they play the Beatles’ arrangement basically note-for-note. I’m still not convinced Bennett is anywhere near as good a singer as he thinks he is, though, and holy shit does he come across as a posterboy for perpetuating the stereotype of British people having horribly crooked teeth. Again, they’re essentially a decent cover band with an overbearing singer and nothing more.


http://youtu.be/vnfl3gNRoK8


Breathe deep the gathering gloom now and get ready for the best-known band on this episode, The Moody Blues. This isn’t your children’s children’s Moody Blues, though; this is the band in their initial Denny Laine-led r&b incarnation. That schmuck Clem introduces them, noting that Laine had been recently voted the best-looking young pop star in England, and making the bizarre pronouncement that “this is very unusual, I think, to play a harmonica with your mouth.” (As opposed to what, sticking it up your ass and blowing through it THAT way?) They start with Laine’s harmonica-led version of Sonny Boy Williamson’s “Bye Bye Bird,” which is spirited enough, but comes off only about as well as any other British band’s grunting-through-a-harp showcase (think Jack Bruce’s “Traintime” in Cream). To me, the best thing about this clip is the pair of young ladies getting down on the dancefloor.


http://youtu.be/7jnTQwQP1U0


They follow with “Really Haven’t Got the Time,” a raucous r&b stomper sung by pianist Mike Pinder. He was probably the best musician to play in the Moodies’ best-known lineup, proving his worth here with a fine barrelhouse piano solo. It’s not entirely amazing, but in the context of this musically rather thin episode, this will pass as another highlight, I suppose.


http://youtu.be/mC4jCjLjnPU


Despite already having three core members in place, this version of the Moody Blues musically shares almost nothing with their best-known lineup, except for the fact that Ray Thomas still basically does nothing but shake tambourines and maracas onstage. Within a year, Justin Hayward would join the band, Mike Pinder would get a mellotron, and the group would become famous for melodramatic psych-pop, some of it very good, some of it not so much. They’d return to Beat Club again in 1968, while Denny Laine would go on to further fame as a member of Paul McCartney’s Wings.

After the Moodies, Uschi goes over to the refreshment stand, where she spends a couple of minutes interviewing a cute bartender named Barbara, who speaks German with an English accent. She then introduces Shape and Sizes, a band of mostly goofy-looking guys (the drummer has oversized novelty glasses and a big cigar, and they all dress in silly outfits), with a really cute female singer. Despite their appearance, their only song, “A Little Lovin’ Somethin,’” is a pretty good chunk of bubblegum-y proto-power pop, with a pounding drum performance and memorable chorus. I don’t know if this band, or any of its members, ever amounted to much, but they at least left us with this memorable performance.


http://youtu.be/V_zEd68jeq4


Uschi holds up a large Tile Club card and gives information for becoming a member of the Beat Club, and she hands it over to Clem, who introduces the last band of the evening, the Washington D.C.’s. They play a fairly average soul-flecked pop song called “32nd Floor,” highlighted by some decent Animals-esque organ. The brief performance ends, and there’s an awkward final shot of the crowd sort of milling about in silence, as if somebody forgot to add closing credits and music in post-production. The end.


http://youtu.be/oJLqI-3VIJw


I like these on-location club shows; even when the musical content is uneven, there’s an energy and excitement about the atmosphere. This episode is primarily notable for taking Beat Club onto British soil for the first time, and for being a sort of test run for the Marquee Club show the next year. It’s not the best episode musically overall, but there are a handful of small pleasures to be found.


(Edited by halleluwah)

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
OMAR
Proud To Be Contarded

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 Posted August 30th, 2011 10:11 AM   IP              
I love this thread; great analysis & description, Jason.
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

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 Posted August 30th, 2011 12:54 PM   IP              
Quote:
OMAR wrote:
I love this thread; great analysis & description, Jason.
Thanks, John! I appreciate it.


I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

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 Posted September 1st, 2011 04:03 AM   IP              



Beat-Club Episode 12
9/24/1966
All performances live, except where noted

1. Opening titles (park bench)
2. The Bunch Of Fives - Can You Hear Me?
3. Carol Friday & The Remo Four - Everybody I Know
4. Carol Friday & The Remo Four - Heatwave
5. Graham Bonney & The Remo Four - Super Girl
6. Graham Bonney & The Remo Four - Barefootin'/Don’t Fight It
7. Sonny & Cher - Then He Kissed Me (mimed on Beat Club stage)
8. Cher - I Feel Something In The Air* (mimed)
9. Sonny Bono - Laugh At Me* (mimed)
10. Sonny & Cher - Little Man* (mimed)
11. Carol Friday & The Remo Four - Little By Little
12. The Bunch Of Fives - Jump Back* (Top 10 shown over screen)
13. Closing credits (“Jump Back” continues)


FULL EPISODE: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4601.html


The live portions of Beat Club’s twelfth episode were again filmed on location, this time from a club with a sign identifying it as Uncle Willy’s Saloon. The show is bookended by performances by The Bunch of Fives, a short-lived British group featuring ex-Pretty Things drummer Viv Prince. Their only real claim to musical immortality is that they apparently provided the guitar-smashing sounds heard when Jeff Beck stomps in his axe in the film Blow-Up. The band’s opening song, “Can You Hear Me?,” is a decent, if extremely brief, mod-soul number with call-and-response vocals and energetic drum breaks. At the end of the first verse, the camera shot of the kick drum head reverses, an early example of the tendency for visual trickery that would soon become something of a calling card for Beat Club.


http://youtu.be/9eRrPCPZDIQ


After this, Uschi (hosting solo again) comes on and introduces British singer Carol Friday, the first of two vocalists who would be backed by our old friends The Remo Four on this show. Carol gets three songs during this episode, and frankly, she’s fucking awful. Her first song, “Everybody I Know,” is probably her high-water mark here, but even it isn’t very good. She’s singing flat through much of it, her high notes turn shrill, and the parts of the verses that require her to do sustained melodic walk-downs are, to put it charitably, adventurous in her selection of pitches. Still, it’s an okay pop song, the Remos play well behind her, and if it’s not too shallow of me to mention this, she is a strikingly beautiful woman. If this was her only performance on the show, I’d consider it at least passable and not give it much further thought.


http://youtu.be/58Bm_os2_oM


But dammit, I can’t, because Carol immediately proceeds to go into Martha and the Vandellas’ “Heatwave,” and…I just can’t forgive her for what she does to it. I mean, it’s so bad it sounds like one of those American Idol auditions that becomes the butt of jokes on late-night talk shows. She takes one of the greatest and most memorable early Motown singles and beats it into a gruesome heap under the weight of her tuneless screeching. I’m actually a little disappointed this isn’t on YouTube; if I’m gonna have to have the mental image of this song’s destruction etched into my brain, I at least want company. I guess I’ll just have to take this one for the team.

Carol Friday then leaves (she’d be back before the end of the show, however, so consider yourselves warned), and her place in front of the Remo Four is taken by Graham Bonney, who last appeared on show eight. He goes directly into his hit “Super Girl” again, this time singing live rather than miming, and it’s abbreviated down to only a single verse and chorus.


http://youtu.be/MKLEo8hre3s


Bonney introduces the audience to a saxophonist who had been backing him on his current tour with the Walker Brothers, and then launches into a medley of “Barefootin’/Don’t Fight It.” This is a fun, highly danceable r&b number that mainly highlights the Remo Four’s talents as a tight backing band. Bonney’s an acceptable, though average, singer, but it still comes off pretty well anyway. Halfway through, the “Don’t Fight It” section starts, and it gets a bit slower and more grinding. The performance is no great shakes, but at least acts as a palate-cleanser after the musical atrocities Carol Friday just inflicted upon us.


http://youtu.be/AXn_HOSOveU


The live portion of the show is put on hold for a time at this point, and Uschi sends us back to the Beat Club studios in Bremen for four mimed performances by Sonny and Cher. The duo had already previously appeared in film clips twice on Beat Club, but this marked the first time they had performed especially for the show itself. There’s another interesting first to be found here as well; this marks the debut of the distinctive all-lower case Beat Club sign hanging behind the performers in the studio. This sign would remain a familiar feature during many performances on the show until 1970.

Sonny and Cher start with a cover of The Crystals’ “Then He Kissed Me,” an appropriate choice, since Sonny’s previous career had been as a publicist/general whipping boy for Phil Spector himself. Cher looks great in a white turtleneck sweater, while Sonny is dressed in a Dylan hat, scarf, and goofy fur vest. This isn’t the greatest version of the song I’ve ever heard, but it’s not bad at all.


http://video.mail.ru/mail/cahek1953/3/269.html


Sonny excuses himself for a wardrobe change (good idea), and Cher takes the spotlight alone to mime her current solo record, “I Feel Something In the Air.” This is undoubtedly the musical highlight of this episode, an ambitious multipart pop opus with a brilliant arrangement that adds an epic feel to the whole thing. It goes through sections of ethereal beauty on the verses, an anthemic bridge, and a more driving uptempo segment. It’s hilarious how the kids in the audience try to clap along, only to be confounded by the tempo changes. I’d never heard this record before, but it’s a real stunner, and Cher’s vocal delivery is sensitive and affecting. If you only watch one clip from this episode, make it this one.


http://youtu.be/RDSlXiUMcVk


Now it’s Sonny’s turn for a solo spotlight, as he reappears in an even goofier striped suit to perform “Laugh at Me.” He introduces it as his favorite and most personal song he’s ever written, and it does indeed display a self-awareness that is kind of touching. You can’t help but like Sonny Bono; he was homely as hell, couldn’t really sing, and had a gawky, awkward manner about him, but he was always affable and aware of his faults. This song isn’t musically the greatest thing you’ll ever hear, but it’s a declaration of a type of “I am who I am, and I have to believe in myself, even if others don’t” sentiment that I find highly honest and moving. Unavailable on YouTube.

Cher returns in a glitzier outfit at this point, and they duet on their last number, “Little Man.” Starting with a Godfather-esque mandolin part, it soon launches into a brisk groove that brings to mind Eastern European folk music or something. It’s another pretty good song, which primarily features Cher on vocals, as Sonny just pops in on the harmonies. The crowd’s attempts to clap in time are even more pathetic this time, as they completely fail at even keeping up with a steady 2/4 rhythm. Although at a disadvantage due to giving the only mimed performances on a mostly live show, Sonny and Cher come off very well in this episode, bringing strong material and a charismatically real stage presence.


http://youtu.be/gQlhH6tDBc8


Son of a bitch…Carol Friday’s coming back on to bring us back into the live club setting. Her last song, “Little By Little,” isn’t bad as a coposition, being a semi-spooky minor-key pop song, but she’s still pretty hopeless behind the microphone. Of the three songs she performs on this episode, only the first is available on YouTube, and I think there’s a good reason for that.

The episode ends with the band that started it, as The Bunch of Fives return for “Jump Back.” This is a fairly strong groover, performed with a tightness and panache rivaling the Remo Four. The lyrical references to current hits “Yellow Submarine” and “Eight Miles High” are kind of lame, but it’s a reasonably strong note to exit on. There apparently wasn’t time for a proper Hit Parader countdown on this episode, so the top 10 titles are simply flashed across the screen as the band plays (Jim Reeves’ “Distant Drums” is at #1 this week, which is a bit odd seeing as he'd been dead for two years at this point). The Bunch of Fives jams on "Jump Back" for a while more as the closing credits roll, before the whole thing fades to black. Unfortunately, this video is unavailable as well.

This was an odd hybrid of an episode, straddled somewhat awkwardly between the mostly forgettable live club performances and the mostly very good studio-shot Sonny and Cher segment. In fact, after the brief peak of strong shows during the middle of the year, for the most part late 1966 was a bit of a fallow period for Beat Club. Not to say that there aren’t some fine moments coming up in the next few episodes, but on the whole, the quality of musical guests wouldn’t truly start to stabilize until the next year. Meanwhile, the next show would be another film clip affair with no new performances.



(Edited by halleluwah)

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
The Venerable Gould
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 Posted September 1st, 2011 05:57 AM   IP              
Ha, poor Carol Friday. I kinda liked her. Like she was just some chancer who somehow managed to end up making music professionally and found herself on a tv show. Don't know anything about her at all, but she seemed to be having fun, looked kinda cute, and I reckon she knew that on some level she was actually quite shit. Which made it quite innocent. I dunno. I think I'm wrong in the head that I enjoy old shit things like this more than old stuff that's supposed to be good.
  
halleluwah
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 Posted September 1st, 2011 12:30 PM   IP              
Quote:
The Venerable Gould wrote:
Ha, poor Carol Friday. I kinda liked her. Like she was just some chancer who somehow managed to end up making music professionally and found herself on a tv show. Don't know anything about her at all, but she seemed to be having fun, looked kinda cute, and I reckon she knew that on some level she was actually quite shit. Which made it quite innocent. I dunno. I think I'm wrong in the head that I enjoy old shit things like this more than old stuff that's supposed to be good.


I do know what you mean; just based on that one clip I was able to find online, I'd probably have the same reaction. She certainly seems happy to be doing what she's doing. But "Heatwave"....wow. That just killed it for me. She is unbelievably bad on that song. There's a certain amount of badness where it's still kind of fun, but once you cross a certain line, man, it's war.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
halleluwah
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 Posted September 1st, 2011 05:29 PM   IP              
By the way, in researching up for episode 13, I came across a lot of new information that I had been incorrect about before. So I went and re-wrote parts of a few entries, most notably Episode 5, which I basically panned at first, but now realize had been completely gutted before it got to DVD, far more than I initially realized. So I re-wrote a lot of that recap to reflect the true reason the show comes off so shitty on the DVD set. Just in case anybody's, you know, keeping score or something.

Also, I happened upon a list of performances that are known to have been filmed during Beat Club sessions, but which never aired at the time, and which still exist in Radio Bremen's archives. It's fairly staggering; I'm not sure it's not longer than the list of actual broadcast performances. Essentially, when a band appeared on Beat Club, producer Mike Leckenbusch had them play a sort of mini-concert of 5-10 songs, and then only one or two performances would be used for the show itself. For some bands, NO performances were ever aired--for example, Led Zeppelin filmed a two-song mimed Beat Club performance in March 1969, and they never showed any of it, except for using a small bit of the footage for a hodgepodge "Whole Lotta Love" video a year later. Some of them have been shown on a Radio Bremen series from a few years ago called "Vinyl," but a ton are still in the vaults. There are rumors that Beat Club is set to release a boxed set of some of these 'lost' performances, but apparently nothing's been heard for a while. It's crazy; the more information I find out about this fucking show, the more questions pop up.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
IanWagner
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 Posted September 1st, 2011 05:51 PM   IP              
Great, great stuff again. Listening and watching religiously. J, ya need to write the literal BOOK about the Club.
   
halleluwah
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 Posted September 1st, 2011 05:58 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
Great, great stuff again. Listening and watching religiously. J, ya need to write the literal BOOK about the Club.
Somebody already did, it turns out! But it's in German and really short!

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IanWagner
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 Posted September 1st, 2011 06:00 PM   IP              
Well, fuck THAT book. A REAL book is needed.
   
The Venerable Gould
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 Posted September 1st, 2011 06:01 PM   IP              
Quote:
halleluwah wrote:
By the way, in researching up for episode 13, I came across a lot of new information that I had been incorrect about before. So I went and re-wrote parts of a few entries, most notably Episode 5, which I basically panned at first, but now realize had been completely gutted before it got to DVD, far more than I initially realized. So I re-wrote a lot of that recap to reflect the true reason the show comes off so shitty on the DVD set. Just in case anybody's, you know, keeping score or something.

Also, I happened upon a list of performances that are known to have been filmed during Beat Club sessions, but which never aired at the time, and which still exist in Radio Bremen's archives. It's fairly staggering; I'm not sure it's not longer than the list of actual broadcast performances. Essentially, when a band appeared on Beat Club, producer Mike Leckenbusch had them play a sort of mini-concert of 5-10 songs, and then only one or two performances would be used for the show itself. For some bands, NO performances were ever aired--for example, Led Zeppelin filmed a two-song mimed Beat Club performance in March 1969, and they never showed any of it, except for using a small bit of the footage for a hodgepodge "Whole Lotta Love" video a year later. Some of them have been shown on a Radio Bremen series from a few years ago called "Vinyl," but a ton are still in the vaults. There are rumors that Beat Club is set to release a boxed set of some of these 'lost' performances, but apparently nothing's been heard for a while. It's crazy; the more information I find out about this fucking show, the more questions pop up.



Can you post that list of lost performances? If it's not too much trouble, that is!
  
halleluwah
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 Posted September 1st, 2011 09:34 PM   IP              
Quote:
The Venerable Gould wrote:


Can you post that list of lost performances? If it's not too much trouble, that is!
Go here:

http://missingepisodes.proboards.co...lay&thread=4538

It's the fifth post down on this thread. Pretty massive list.


I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
halleluwah
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 Posted September 2nd, 2011 01:07 AM   IP              
Beat-Club Episode 13
10/22/1966
All performances on film from other sources

1. Lovin' Spoonful - Summer in the City
2. Manfred Mann - Just Like a Woman
3. Peter & Gordon - Lady Godiva
4. The Ramsey Lewis Trio - A Hard Day’s Night
5. Simon & Garfunkel - I Am a Rock
6. Sonny & Cher – Monday
7. Tommy James & the Shondells - Hanky Panky
8. Walker Brothers - Baby You Don't Have to Tell Me
9. Walker Brothers - The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine Anymore
10. Walker Brothers – Everything’s Gonna Be Alright


FULL EPISODE: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4602.html


Beat Club episode thirteen is a singular oddity in the show’s history. After having been on the air for a full year as of September 1966, the next broadcast in October was a kind of celebratory lap of success, showing film clips of several big-name acts performing recent hits. Unlike the previous clip show (episode nine), none of these performances originated in the Beat Club studios; this was the only time in the show’s entire run that a full episode was exclusively devoted to externally licensed clips. As such, it was omitted from the DVD release, and so I don’t have it at my disposal to watch. In fact, until very recently, this episode was considered lost altogether, as no copy remained in Radio Bremen’s archives; in 2009, however, a collector provided the network with a videotaped copy, and it was re-broadcast for the first time in decades. Given Radio Bremen’s diligence in archiving this show, this is the only episode of Beat Club to ever hold the distinction of being ‘lost,’ a rare feat in the world of 60s pop shows.

Due to the strange and obscure history of this episode, finding definite information about where each of the clips hails from is difficult, and I don’t have a full listing, especially without having the show to watch for myself. However, with a bit of detective/guess work, I’m 95% sure I’ve pieced together a likely sequence of which clips were shown, aside from the Sonny and Cher song. Most of them were promo films made by the artists and distributed to several different shows, while only the Ramsey Lewis and Walker Brothers capture specific performances. Most of them feature the same type of distinctive Helvetica-fonted titles shown at the bottom of the screen, identifying them as hailing from this Beat Club episode. Here’s the rundown, in the order they were shown:


The Lovin’ Spoonful – Summer In the City (promo film):
http://youtu.be/rYuVPGmw3D4


Manfred Mann – Just Like a Woman (promo film):
http://youtu.be/9Yk-LsIaj_M


Peter & Gordon – Lady Godiva (promo film):
http://youtu.be/cyzUoDwDhi4


Ramsey Lewis Trio – A Hard Day’s Night (live performance from unknown show):
http://youtu.be/-KvgVQgZsrY


Simon and Garfunkel – I Am a Rock (promo film):
http://youtu.be/eWPXqxc9Lj0


Sonny and Cher – Monday (unknown origin, and not on YouTube, apparently)


Tommy James and the Shondells – Hanky Panky (promo film):
http://youtu.be/BbsoeoGv-_U


Walker Brothers - Baby You Don't Have to Tell Me (mimed on Top of the Pops; first 46 seconds of both videos below)


Walker Brothers - The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine Anymore (live vocals on Ready, Steady, Go!; starts at :47 in this video):
http://youtu.be/WTTR3fI8jjo


Walker Brothers – Everything’s Gonna Be Alright (live vocals on Ready, Steady, Go!; starts at :47 in this video):
http://youtu.be/iF0arBtdk78


All of these clips are of interest as period pieces from the time when the music video was in its infancy, and most of them are fine records to begin with. The most interesting clips to me are the last two Walker Brothers performances that close the show, as Scott and John are actually singing live to a backing tape rather than miming, a rarity on their television appearances. Also notable is that this episode was the only time in Beat Club’s history that such major artists of the era as Simon and Garfunkel and The Lovin’ Spoonful would appear on the show.

While this installment was an interesting detour for Beat Club, with a lost-and-found history that made it legendary beyond its real identity as a simple clip showcase, in the grand scheme of things it’s mostly just a curiosity, and one the producers would never return to. The next show would return to the standard performance structure, with mixed results.


(Edited by halleluwah)

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
The Venerable Gould
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 Posted September 2nd, 2011 05:40 AM   IP              
Quote:
halleluwah wrote:
Go here:

http://missingepisodes.proboards.co...lay&thread=4538

It's the fifth post down on this thread. Pretty massive list.




shit, that's a huge list! insane that that amount of stuff was never broadcast.
  
halleluwah
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 Posted September 2nd, 2011 12:07 PM   IP              
Quote:
The Venerable Gould wrote:


shit, that's a huge list! insane that that amount of stuff was never broadcast.
I know! Crazy, isn't it? I'm really intrigued by some of these...like, Tim Buckley taped two songs for the show, but he never actually made an appearance on-air, The Pretty Things and Fotheringay both did three additional songs for their '70 sessions, where only a paltry one apiece were broadcast, Curtis Mayfield, MC5, Edwin Starr, String Band, Mountain, Sabbath, Zeppelin, a whole shitload of '72 Kinks, etc, etc, etc. I'm getting a little wet just looking down that list. I really do hope they choose to release that stuff on DVD someday.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
The Venerable Gould
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 Posted September 2nd, 2011 12:58 PM   IP              
The one that intrigued me the most was Fairfield Parlour. There's barely any Kaleidoscope footage out there - there's some ropey French footage, I think, but that's about it - but to find out there are three Fairfield Parlour clips just sitting in the vault is kind of maddening. I don't see why this stuff wouldn't get put out some day - there have been enough Beat Club DVD releases so there must something of a market for this stuff. Plus the fact that barely any of this stuff is on YouTube (well, I'm guessing barely any of it is) makes it all the more intriguing for fans. What I'd really love is if you could download individual performances from some official Beat Club website. But then I'd love to be able to do that from just about any company that still has its archives in tact. So wishful thinking basically!
  
halleluwah
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 Posted September 2nd, 2011 01:15 PM   IP              
Quote:
The Venerable Gould wrote:
The one that intrigued me the most was Fairfield Parlour. There's barely any Kaleidoscope footage out there - there's some ropey French footage, I think, but that's about it - but to find out there are three Fairfield Parlour clips just sitting in the vault is kind of maddening. I don't see why this stuff wouldn't get put out some day - there have been enough Beat Club DVD releases so there must something of a market for this stuff. Plus the fact that barely any of this stuff is on YouTube (well, I'm guessing barely any of it is) makes it all the more intriguing for fans. What I'd really love is if you could download individual performances from some official Beat Club website. But then I'd love to be able to do that from just about any company that still has its archives in tact. So wishful thinking basically!
Yeah, totally. If there was a website where you could just download whatever videos you wanted, that would be great. You could pick out the stuff you really wanted to see, and not bother with watching even more Morrison-less Doors and Stone the Crows than they originally put on the air. (Or Anne Murray, for that matter! Why the hell did she go in for a Beat Club taping at the height of their heavily progressive period? Weird.) Of course, a lot of the fun of going through Beat Club in full for me is the juxtaposition of the sublime performances with the bad ones, but with outtakes...I dunno. I'd watch all of them if I had them at my disposal, I guess, but I wouldn't exactly feel a huge void in my life if I never see any of those additional Hardin + York clips.

A lot of these clips have been shown on TV over the past few years, but unless you live in Germany, or somebody tapes it off of TV and puts it on YouTube, you can't see them. I have seen maybe one or two of those clips on YouTube, but they're in pretty rotten quality. It would definitely be nice to see them in the remastered picture/sound quality of the official Beat Club Story box.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
halleluwah
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 Posted September 6th, 2011 02:27 AM   IP              
Beat-Club Episode 14
11/19/1966
All performances mimed, except where noted

1. Opening Titles (park bench)
2. John Smith & The New Sound - Winchester Cathedral (live)
3. David & Jonathan - Lovers Of The World Unite
4. Lee Drummond - Hi Hi Hazel
5. John Smith & The New Sound - Big Big Time Operator (live)
6. David Garrick - Dear Mrs. Applebee
7. Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich - Hard To Love You*
8. Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich – Bend It*
9. Hit Parader Top 10
10. David & Jonathan - Ten Storeys High
11. John Smith & The New Sound - You Don't Know Like I Know (live)
12. Jacques Dutronc - Et Moi, Et Moi, Et Moi... *
13. End credits (“Et Moi, Et Moi, Et Moi” continues)


FULL EPISODE: http://video.mail.ru/mail/stepochki...TCLUB/4603.html


As I stated at the end of the episode 12 recap, late 1966 was a bit of a low ebb for Beat Club in terms of quality, and nowhere is this more apparent than in this particular installment. It’s not a bad show, per se, but there really isn’t a whole lot about it that’s especially memorable, either. Still, there are a few pleasant surprises to be found here, albeit minor ones. And in fact, there is one facet of this episode that does mark it as something of a transitional landmark show: for the first time on a ‘regular’ Beat Club, the mimed performances heavily outnumber the live ones. Only one guest is allowed to play live here (not that it particularly helps in their case), while all the others engage in lipsynching. It would be a few months before Beat Club would officially make the switch to being a predominantly mimed show, but this episode stands as an early signpost for things to come on that front.

At any rate, the one band who does get to play live on today’s show is John Smith and The New Sound, a British group whose stock in trade was to simply churn out rote covers of recently popular novelty hits (their first album was called, I shit you not, “Snoopy Vs. the Red Baron/Winchester Cathedral”…presumably, they were hoping nobody would wonder how such a slavishly derivative band could gather the balls to call themselves ‘The New Sound’). They open the show with, you guessed it, their cover of The New Vaudeville Band’s “Winchester Cathedral,” in a version that sticks pretty closely to the original arrangement. Hilariously, John Smith himself attempts to replicate the vocal effect on the hit version by simply holding his nose throughout the entire vocal section. The audience seems to realize how lame this is, and the dancing is understandably tepid during this song. This band’s remaining two songs on the show would be soul covers, but they wouldn’t really be much better, unfortunately.


http://youtu.be/-xPFVFm8NpA


Uschi, dressed in a happening corduroy suit, comes on to say gutentag, and introduces the first of our parade of miming artists today. David and Jonathan was a performing pseudonym for songwriters Roger Greenaway and Roger Cook, who would write a number of hit songs for other artists such as The Hollies, Gene Pitney, and The Fortunes, before settling into a living writing commercial jingles in the 70s (the original version of “I’d Like to Buy the World a Coke” was theirs). In the meantime, they had a couple of decent-sized U.K. hits as performers in the mid-60s, including “Lovers of the World Unite,” which had recently peaked at #7. It’s a record with that peculiar quality of being simultaneously faceless and catchy, which I suppose is a useful skill for jingle-writers to possess. As performers, they’re spirited but a little goony. By the way, with their Biblical-themed name and their contrasting white and black suits, I wonder if they had some kind of performance theme in mind here.


http://youtu.be/H66AisjsoQo


A British singer named Lee Drummond is next, and apparently, the only information on him that exists on the internet is solely connected to his appearing on this show. The most memorable thing about his performance of “Hi Hi Hazel” is that he has one of the thickest, most prominent unibrows I have ever seen on anybody this side of Sesame Street’s Bert. He performs the song too, but frankly, I barely noticed.

Lee’s sole 2:45 of fame now exhausted, John Smith and the New Sound return to play “Big Time Operator.” It’s a reasonable soul-pop performance, with a tight, punchy horn arrangement, but Smith here comes across like a budget-rate Eric Burdon imitator behind the mic. It seems that his vocal style was entirely dictated by whatever tune his band was aping at the moment. Like Drummond’s song, nobody has seen fit to place this performance on YouTube.

David Garrick was your standard one-hit-wonder teenybopper singer; his “Dear Mrs. Applebee” was only a medium-level hit in his native England, but reached #1 in Germany, and he is clearly milking his brief success for all it’s worth on his debut Beat Club performance. He shows up dressed in frilly Swinging London finery, and mimes his song directly into the faces of several pretty girls in the front row, including one whose hair he rather creepily begins to fondle. Like much of the material performed on this episode, this song is kind of lame, but it’s not offensively bad. Despite never repeating the success of this song, Garrick would return for another appearance on Beat Club a year later.


http://youtu.be/EpV0H8CACiQ


Next up is the second appearance of Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick, and Tich (although I think Tich is absent at this taping for some reason). “Hard To Love You” is their first song here, and it follows in the footsteps of the material they’d played on their debut performance: a straight-up bubblegum song with a good hook peppered with low, heavy riffs. And again, the results are pretty good, far outshining any of the pop material we’ve heard thus far in the show for memorability.


http://youtu.be/897NsBd6SoE


DDDBM&T’s second song, “Bend It,” is a mandolin-based song with a distinctively European feel. Indeed, it reached the top of the charts in Germany, while stalling in England due to a controversy over the supposed suggestive nature to the lyrics. There’s a unique structure to this tune, as each verse begins slowly and gradually picks up speed as it rushes towards the chorus, before stopping and slowing down again. It’s like a bubblegum version of “Heroin” or something. You know, I’m beginning to think that maybe I was initially a little too hard on these guys. If you first see DDDBM&T in the later days of the show, doing hokey bullwhip routines on episodes where they’re competing with the Small Faces and Procol Harum, they don’t come off great, but if you see them earlier in their proper context, surrounded by dancing teenagers who clearly love them, they make tons more sense. I’m not as into this particular song as I am into the three songs they’d previously performed on Beat Club, but it’s still pretty good, and is still a highlight on this show. As if it needed to be noted, DDDBM&T would return to Beat Club in the not-too-distant future.


http://youtu.be/hTR06YItGVo
(Pay no attention to the mislabeling of this clip as being from 1968…it’s the performance from this episode, trust me.)


It’s time for the Hit Parader Top 10 list, given a new, more streamlined format that is visually sleeker than previous installments. Instead of eating up large chunks of show time by airing 30-second clips of each song, Uschi simply counts them all down to the soundtrack of “Good Vibrations,” the week's #1 record, while the song titles starkly flash on the screen. It turns out the newly ‘professional’ look is a bit of a ruse, however, as when the camera goes to a wider angle, it's revealed that Uschi is holding the cards with the song titles on them herself, and simply flipping them as she counts them down. You’ve got to love cheap production values.

At this point, David and Jonathan return for one more song, “Ten Storeys High.” It’s certainly a pretty song, far more memorable than their first, and it works its way up to a nice, mock-Spector climax. I’m not particularly convinced by either of them as an effective lead vocalist for this type of song, but it’s not bad at all.


http://youtu.be/buYNwqTDI-c


We get one last live moment from John Smith and the New Sound next, this time doing Sam and Dave’s “You Don’t Know Like I Know.” Again, the band sounds pretty good, but if you’re gonna pull off material like this, you need to be able to offer something beyond an average club singer vocally. You won’t find this anywhere on YouTube.

Judging by the way this episode has played out, that definitely felt like it should have been the closing number of the show. But Beat Club had one curve ball for us on this occasion, saved for the very end. Jacques Dutronc is something of a cult artist, a French singer-songwriter whose work is much more rooted in the rock idiom than better-known counterparts such as Serge Gainsbourg. For what it’s worth, he’s also Francoise Hardy’s husband. His song here, “Et Moi, Et Moi, Et Moi,” is a decently tough garage rocker in the mold of “The Last Time”-era Stones, sung in French and delivered with a cool Dylan-ish sneer by Dutronc. He sounds like he’s assimilated his influences well, as this performance, seemingly tagged on at the end of the show as a bit of an afterthought, stands out as a post-script of genuine coolness coming at the end of a mostly lackluster episode. It’s unfortunately not singled out for such distinction by the Beat Club producers themselves, though, who start rolling the credits and fade to black before the song is even over. Annoyingly, only a short segment of this performance is available on YouTube; there are plenty of other videos on there of the guy performing elsewhere, though. At any rate, it’s good to see this show end on a high note.


http://youtu.be/WJm4Ul7hO68


Honestly, there’s not a whole lot to say in summing up this episode. Most of the artists on hand had legitimate chart hits at the time, so it’s not as if the producers probably thought they were putting on a substandard show when it aired. It’s just that, with a couple of exceptions, time has not been particularly kind to the music or careers of the artists featured on this episode, and so it feels weak when viewed today. Fortunately, this episode was the nadir of Beat Club’s autumn 1966 slump, and the next show would be a marked improvement.


(Edited by halleluwah)

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
Matinee Idyll (129)
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 Posted September 6th, 2011 02:33 AM   IP              
Fuck yeah Jacques Dutronc!


"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
IanWagner
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 Posted September 6th, 2011 11:30 AM   IP              
Nice one, Jason!
Now I really want to form a psychedelic folk soul band named The Happening Corduroy Suit.

   
halleluwah
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 Posted September 6th, 2011 12:17 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
Nice one, Jason!
Now I really want to form a psychedelic folk soul band named The Happening Corduroy Suit.


Or a hipster post-rock band called The Happening! Corduroy Suit.

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