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.:Movie Report Card (the watching thread redeux):.
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Matinee Idyll (129)
Camp Counsellor

Posts: 8244
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted March 30th, 2011 06:29 AM   IP              
Gosh, what fun! Harryhausen can have me any time he pleases. What a talent, some of his finest creations. The story was a curious mash-up of Greek mythology, with some parts of the Perseus legend sadly left out (Atlas has always struck me as one of the great tragic figures in myth). Anywho, it's really all about the effects - incredible that Ursula Andress didn't age a jot in the 20 years between She and Clash of the Titans!


"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
Matinee Idyll (129)
Camp Counsellor

Posts: 8244
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted March 30th, 2011 06:32 AM   IP              
Crazy!

She:



Clash of the Titans:


"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
Bubba Ho-Tep
God's Lonely Man

Posts: 12493
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 1st, 2011 10:46 PM   IP              
Rented "The Fighter". I liked it fine but somehow the ending felt anti-climatic and unsatisfying.
I want to be a writer when I grow up. CLICK HERE and humor me!
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 1st, 2011 11:19 PM   IP              
Absolutely. It turned from being an interesting, quirky film into a standard, sports-movie rehash. Blecch. Couple nice performances in there, though.
   
Beckner
One Motherfucker

Posts: 19232
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 1st, 2011 11:40 PM   IP              


Incredible.
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 2nd, 2011 01:22 AM   IP              
Isn't it?
   
Matinee Idyll (129)
Camp Counsellor

Posts: 8244
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 2nd, 2011 03:29 AM   IP              
Do Paper Moon next, Dave! Just as good, but in different ways... plus, she says you're better looking than Dick Powell!



"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
Jeff Mason
The Nitrate Bandit

Posts: 20814
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 2nd, 2011 08:44 PM   IP              


Good lord, what an insane film, or at least first 1/3. If that full five hour version had ever been filmed/finished, I think we'd have the all time classic over-the-top melodrama. The scenes in the African brothel are REALLY laying it on. You can tell why Swanson was so uncomfortable about it. But the art direction, the amazing sets and photography, it was an utterly compelling watch. Does anyone know when the soundtrack was made? It sounds like a vintage 1929 soundtrack but I would have to think that they had not yet made the music up. Or was it on the 1931 released version in Europe?

Cool special features too. Not too often you get a star talking for 20 minutes straight about an unfinished legendary masterpiece.
(Edited by Jeff Mason)
   
Bubba Ho-Tep
God's Lonely Man

Posts: 12493
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 2nd, 2011 08:46 PM   IP              
Quote:
Matinee Idyll (129) wrote:
Do Paper Moon next, Dave! Just as good, but in different ways... plus, she says you're better looking than Dick Powell!


I love Paper Moon. Makes me want to move to Kansas.

I want to be a writer when I grow up. CLICK HERE and humor me!
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 2nd, 2011 10:09 PM   IP              
Quote:
Jeff Mason wrote:


Good lord, what an insane film, or at least first 1/3. If that full five hour version had ever been filmed/finished, I think we'd have the all time classic over-the-top melodrama. The scenes in the African brothel are REALLY laying it on. You can tell why Swanson was so uncomfortable about it. But the art direction, the amazing sets and photography, it was an utterly compelling watch. Does anyone know when the soundtrack was made? It sounds like a vintage 1929 soundtrack but I would have to think that they had not yet made the music up. Or was it on the 1931 released version in Europe?

Cool special features too. Not too often you get a star talking for 20 minutes straight about an unfinished legendary masterpiece.


Big favourite of mine.

   
Bubba Ho-Tep
God's Lonely Man

Posts: 12493
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 2nd, 2011 11:12 PM   IP              



Brilliant!

I want to be a writer when I grow up. CLICK HERE and humor me!
   
Jeff Mason
The Nitrate Bandit

Posts: 20814
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 2nd, 2011 11:15 PM   IP              


Wow. Just wow.

Why did you guys think I would hate this?
   
Jeff Mason
The Nitrate Bandit

Posts: 20814
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 2nd, 2011 11:35 PM   IP              
Still thinking about this. I could be totally offbase, but this is what I am seeing....

First off, you can't miss the Twin Peaks vibe. Clearly this is something that matters to Lynch, the layers of corruption under what seems to be a vibrant and safe environment (you have to dig the bugs under the grass at the opening, and the robins, source of love, ultimately eating the bugs at the end as a pretty obvious metaphor of that clash).

Second, I sort of am seeing Kyle Maclachlan as a surrogate for Lynch himself, as Lynch's ideal of himself. Acting out what Lynch sees in his dreams, opening up the seedy side of life, drawn in by no more than idle curiosity. He doesn't want any part of it, but like a voyeur wants to see what is going on, and ultimately is both drawn into it and severely repelled by it.

And yet, Lynch notices that the "normal" world sometimes is a pale reflection of the darkness. Laura Dern's boyfriend coming after Jeffrey seems so weak after the rampage of evil from Hopper, but yet the intent and emotion is basically the same -- a desire to possess. Hopper is just more obvious and maniacally willing to do whatever it takes to please himself.

I am sure more thoughts will follow later. Lynch is coming up fast in my way of thinking as a favorite. That is the best of any film in the 80s that I have seen, I will say that.
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 2nd, 2011 11:42 PM   IP              
Quote:
Bubba Ho-Tep wrote:



Brilliant!


Seriously? I love De Palma, but I nearly walked out on that one, especially since the supporting feature was Craven's brilliant The People Under The Stairs.

   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 2nd, 2011 11:55 PM   IP              
Quote:
Jeff Mason wrote:
Second, I sort of am seeing Kyle Maclachlan as a surrogate for Lynch himself,


YA THINK??? :-)
Seriously though, glad you liked it. Those are some good, accurate thoughts you have upon first viewing. It is hard for me to think of how the film would be as seen for the first time now, as my feelings on it are so coloured by its original 80s context. Now, we are fully postmodern, and all the truly shocking elements of the film have been submerged into the film language. But back then? Nothing like it. I imagine it was similar to what it would have been like seeing Psycho when it was released.
I have seen Blue Velvet so many times, in so many different settings, and so many different life circumstances, that it is hard to come up with any new thoughts about it at all. It is like trying to come up with new praise for Pet Sounds, The Beatles and Led Zeppelin. I can't imagine a world before Blue Velvet, really. It is like another limb for me. And probably suffers for it.
The important thing, really, is that he meant all of it. No irony. That great speech Laura Dern gives? He MEANS that. That is how Lynch really views the possibilities of life and existence.
One thing that most folks don't talk about is the complex shading given to Hopper's character (who, let's face it, is simply the darker nature of Jeffrey, Lynch and the audience). Sure, he is an offensive, brutal maniac. But, man, he LOVES MUSIC! He is moved to tears by it. He'd probably be the type of person to love Blue Velvet, actually.
One great central visual motif is the undulating blue velvet robe, whcih fills the screen in both sets of credits, thereby serving as a super-intimate form of proscenium curtain. When those curtains move, what will we see?
I saw that film at the Westwood Crest when it came out, a massive, prestigious venue for the newest and brightest films. It brought everything that had been boiling up under the surface of cinema, left unexpressed or hinted at, as well as the freedom and experimentalism of underground cinema, and brought it into the world of big, beautiful, epic Hollywood movieland. The world hasn't recovered.
I don't think it is the best film of the 80's, though. But it is up there.

   
Chris D.
Gene Rayburn's BLANK

Posts: 3213
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 3rd, 2011 09:15 AM   IP              
Quote:
One thing that most folks don't talk about is the complex shading given to Hopper's character (who, let's face it, is simply the darker nature of Jeffrey, Lynch and the audience). Sure, he is an offensive, brutal maniac. But, man, he LOVES MUSIC! He is moved to tears by it. He'd probably be the type of person to love Blue Velvet, actually.


Probably my favorite aspect of the movie. It's why I feel so uncomfortable when I show it to people and they laugh at Frank's dialogue, even though it is hilarious in its own way. But he's a person. Kind of a simpler version of what Ellis would do with Patrick Bateman later (except Frank's for real and I never buy Bateman as a killer).

I also think the complexity of Frank is what's missing for me from Twin Peaks. Or else I'm just burned out on 10 years of watching, but I think in Twin Peaks Lynch indulged his taste for characters as ideas instead of characters as people. In Blue Velvet they're all people. In TP I think they start out as people and change a little more into ideas, which was fine with me at 17 but harder to digest now.

Glad you liked the movie, Jeff. That's my favorite of his early movies, though Highway is still my favorite, period.

When Ian Wagner meditates, he uses the lyrics to "Wild Wild West" by Escape Club as his mantra.
   
alan
Richard Thompson's G-String

Posts: 2022
Registered: Sep 2007
 Posted April 3rd, 2011 10:49 AM   IP              
Lynch is about the only director you can think of whose work could just as easily be displayed in an art gallery and could be judged on those terms.
   
Bubba Ho-Tep
God's Lonely Man

Posts: 12493
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 3rd, 2011 03:04 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:


Seriously? I love De Palma, but I nearly walked out on that one, especially since the supporting feature was Craven's brilliant The People Under The Stairs.


Yeah, I really enjoyed it!

What other DePalma films do you recommend I seek out? I've seen all the obvious ones....Sisters, Carrie, Phantom, Blow Out, Casualties of War (a looooong time ago, though), Bonfire of the Vanities, Scarface, Carlito, Body Double (boobies), MI, Black Dahlia...

I've never seen "The Untouchables"! I don't know how that happened. And I'm having a hard time snatching up "Dressed To Kill" at a fair price. But I will...eventually...

Is The Fury any good?

I want to be a writer when I grow up. CLICK HERE and humor me!
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 3rd, 2011 03:43 PM   IP              
Get Dressed To Kill immediately, then Femme Fatale. The Fury is worth seeing. If you have as much of a Nancy Allen love as I do, then Home Movies is worth seeing too. If you like late 60's/early 70's hippie paranoia comedy, and/or De Niro, then Greetings and Hi Mom! are worth a look.
   
Chris D.
Gene Rayburn's BLANK

Posts: 3213
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 3rd, 2011 04:40 PM   IP              
Quote:
Jeff Mason wrote:


Good lord, what an insane film, or at least first 1/3. If that full five hour version had ever been filmed/finished, I think we'd have the all time classic over-the-top melodrama. The scenes in the African brothel are REALLY laying it on. You can tell why Swanson was so uncomfortable about it. But the art direction, the amazing sets and photography, it was an utterly compelling watch. Does anyone know when the soundtrack was made? It sounds like a vintage 1929 soundtrack but I would have to think that they had not yet made the music up. Or was it on the 1931 released version in Europe?

Cool special features too. Not too often you get a star talking for 20 minutes straight about an unfinished legendary masterpiece.
(Edited by Jeff Mason)


It is an all-time classic! You really see it as melodrama, though? I guess I should watch it again, since it's been a few years. I always felt like it was pure comedy.

When Ian Wagner meditates, he uses the lyrics to "Wild Wild West" by Escape Club as his mantra.
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 3rd, 2011 04:48 PM   IP              
Quote:
Chris D. wrote:
what Ellis would do with Patrick Bateman later (except Frank's for real and I never buy Bateman as a killer).


Exactly. That's why the movie American Psycho is brilliant. People like Bateman are too milquetoast to actually kill anyone, even if they have those thoughts. And somehow that makes the story even more chilling.

   
Jeff Mason
The Nitrate Bandit

Posts: 20814
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 3rd, 2011 06:09 PM   IP              
Quote:
Chris D. wrote:


It is an all-time classic! You really see it as melodrama, though? I guess I should watch it again, since it's been a few years. I always felt like it was pure comedy.


Structurally it sure is -- innocent put into extreme situations of peril, heavy handed use of damsel in distress. But by "over the top" there is certainly room for it to be a parody on that as well. There is both absurdity as well as pathos in the scene where the innocent Kelly gets whipped by the Queen and thrown out of the palace in her nightgown.
   
Chris D.
Gene Rayburn's BLANK

Posts: 3213
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 3rd, 2011 07:42 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:


Exactly. That's why the movie American Psycho is brilliant. People like Bateman are too milquetoast to actually kill anyone, even if they have those thoughts. And somehow that makes the story even more chilling.


True. Bateman is a hero, because he wants to live morally, but no one around him cares. So he has to live this plastic existence and to balance that out he fantasizes about extreme murder. Frank helps you decide if you become like him or become a hero.

When Ian Wagner meditates, he uses the lyrics to "Wild Wild West" by Escape Club as his mantra.
   
Jon
The Bubblegum Supremacist

Posts: 9214
Registered: Sep 2007
 Posted April 4th, 2011 09:38 AM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:


YA THINK??? :-)
Seriously though, glad you liked it. Those are some good, accurate thoughts you have upon first viewing. It is hard for me to think of how the film would be as seen for the first time now, as my feelings on it are so coloured by its original 80s context. Now, we are fully postmodern, and all the truly shocking elements of the film have been submerged into the film language. But back then? Nothing like it. I imagine it was similar to what it would have been like seeing Psycho when it was released.
I have seen Blue Velvet so many times, in so many different settings, and so many different life circumstances, that it is hard to come up with any new thoughts about it at all. It is like trying to come up with new praise for Pet Sounds, The Beatles and Led Zeppelin. I can't imagine a world before Blue Velvet, really. It is like another limb for me. And probably suffers for it.
The important thing, really, is that he meant all of it. No irony. That great speech Laura Dern gives? He MEANS that. That is how Lynch really views the possibilities of life and existence.
One thing that most folks don't talk about is the complex shading given to Hopper's character (who, let's face it, is simply the darker nature of Jeffrey, Lynch and the audience). Sure, he is an offensive, brutal maniac. But, man, he LOVES MUSIC! He is moved to tears by it. He'd probably be the type of person to love Blue Velvet, actually.
One great central visual motif is the undulating blue velvet robe, whcih fills the screen in both sets of credits, thereby serving as a super-intimate form of proscenium curtain. When those curtains move, what will we see?
I saw that film at the Westwood Crest when it came out, a massive, prestigious venue for the newest and brightest films. It brought everything that had been boiling up under the surface of cinema, left unexpressed or hinted at, as well as the freedom and experimentalism of underground cinema, and brought it into the world of big, beautiful, epic Hollywood movieland. The world hasn't recovered.
I don't think it is the best film of the 80's, though. But it is up there.


I dunno if those were NEW thoughts, but it sure summed up how I feel about the film. Superb.

I don't know why I ever believed the Chipmunks had the lowdown on punk.
   
Jon
The Bubblegum Supremacist

Posts: 9214
Registered: Sep 2007
 Posted April 4th, 2011 09:40 AM   IP              
Quote:
I also think the complexity of Frank is what's missing for me from Twin Peaks. Or else I'm just burned out on 10 years of watching, but I think in Twin Peaks Lynch indulged his taste for characters as ideas instead of characters as people. In Blue Velvet they're all people. In TP I think they start out as people and change a little more into ideas, which was fine with me at 17 but harder to digest now.


I think, oddly, that the most human and complex character in Twin Peaks is Pete Martel. He's not a brutal psychopath like Frank, but he has shading, light and dark. He's a troubled man with a good heart who finds enormous sadness in the world. He's not a cipher. He's a real guy. You love him, you feel his pain.

I don't know why I ever believed the Chipmunks had the lowdown on punk.
   
Bubba Ho-Tep
God's Lonely Man

Posts: 12493
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 8th, 2011 11:35 PM   IP              




I can't even find the words....

I want to be a writer when I grow up. CLICK HERE and humor me!
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 8th, 2011 11:41 PM   IP              
A truly incredible film, isn't it? I think that is among the finest films of the last 20 years, at least.
   
Chris D.
Gene Rayburn's BLANK

Posts: 3213
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 9th, 2011 08:41 AM   IP              
Quote:
Jon wrote:


I think, oddly, that the most human and complex character in Twin Peaks is Pete Martel. He's not a brutal psychopath like Frank, but he has shading, light and dark. He's a troubled man with a good heart who finds enormous sadness in the world. He's not a cipher. He's a real guy. You love him, you feel his pain.


Absolutely. I think they almost all did at some point...in the pilot Cooper is kind of dark. But it comes and goes for some reason. Maybe because of too many writers, maybe because it's an ongoing story.

When Ian Wagner meditates, he uses the lyrics to "Wild Wild West" by Escape Club as his mantra.
   
Bubba Ho-Tep
God's Lonely Man

Posts: 12493
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 10th, 2011 02:38 PM   IP              
Watched "The Descent" last night. We had previously seen it in the theater way back when it came out. I remembered liking it, and I still like it. It works for me.
I want to be a writer when I grow up. CLICK HERE and humor me!
   
Bubba Ho-Tep
God's Lonely Man

Posts: 12493
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted April 13th, 2011 01:51 PM   IP              
Home sick with the tonsilitis. Watched "Blue Velvet" since the subject just came up.

Got "Dressed to Kill" in the mail today and gonna watch it now.

I want to be a writer when I grow up. CLICK HERE and humor me!
   



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