.:The Record Room:.


.:Poll:.
Best Single Of 1968 #2
Wonderboy - The Kinks 0% [0/31]
With A Little Help From My Friends - Joe Cocker 0% [0/31]
Wild Tiger Woman - The Move 0% [0/31]
Wichita Lineman - Glen Campbell 23% [7/31]
Who's Making Love - Johnnie Taylor 3% [1/31]
White Room - Cream 3% [1/31]
White Light/White Heat - The Velvet Underground 10% [3/31]
What's Made Milwaukee Famous (Has Made A Loser Out Of Me) - Jerry Lee Lewis 0% [0/31]
What A Wonderful World - Louis Armstrong 16% [5/31]
What A Man - Lynda Lyndell 0% [0/31]
We're Rolling On - The Impressions 0% [0/31]
We'll Get Ahead Someday - Porter Wagoner & Dolly Parton 0% [0/31]
We Can Fly - The Cowsills 10% [3/31]
Waiting Around To Die - Townes Van Zandt 6% [2/31]
Voodoo Child (Slight Return) - Jimi Hendrix 29% [9/31]


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.:1968 Singles Poll #2 PLEASE LISTEN BEFORE VOTING!!:.
Author Message
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 02:13 PM   IP              
46 minutes this time, a few longer tunes. Please, please listen before voting.


http://www.megaupload.com/?d=ZOSBCXFR





So many folks seem to hate Wonderboy, even some members of The Kinks. But maybe I am just completely uncritical of their 60's work, because I hear it as brilliant, more mad than straightforwardly fey. And John Lennon loved it too. So there. Not their best of this year, of course.
Yeah, With A Little Help From My Friends has suffered a ton o' Woodstock/Wonder Years overplay, damaging it. But I love Cocker's early work, the arrangement is an utterly brilliant save of one of The Beatles' weakest tunes, and Jimmy Page's guitar work is incredible particularly the trademark downward swoop at 2:19. Listen for Brenda and Patrice Holloway's backing vocals and expert drumming from BJ Wilson.
The Move are one of my favourite bands, one of the most unique and distinctive groups one could find, and this was their heaviest single yet. Those ascending guitar lines on the heavy-pop Wild Tiger Woman kill me. Love it, utterly, everything it represents. Listen for Nicky Hopkins' piano. Classic B-side on this one as well, Omnibus. Check it out!
Wichita Lineman is Wichita Lineman. OK? The great achievement, and lasting artistic testament of both Jimmy Webb and Glen Campbell. An outrageously soulful, mysterious and even spooky piece of work. The guitar and horn/strings break is fucking magical. I'd be surprised if it didn't win this one outright. Still, only second place for me.
Who's Making Love? was an important record in Stax history, as it was the company's first breakout smash after their seemingly disastrous severance from Atlantic distribution. Taylor was an interesting figure, labouring since the late 50's in the shadow of mentor Sam Cooke, and finally becoming a star with this record. A tormented man, his career through the mid-70's is classic-studded, and worth close study. And oh yeah, this record is amazing.
White Room has suffered a lotta overplay damage, unfortunately. Still, this record is great and there is a lot to love here. The intro/break theme is memorable, the guitar tone throughout is nasty and remarkable, particularly on two of Eric Clapton's greatest solos. The sonic rawness of the basic band track is also of note. Very dynamic piece of work.
White Light-White Heat is the speed/New Age anthem title track of my favourite album by my favourite band. In a certain way, it is also a great single choice, considering the warped Jerry Lee piano beamed in from the roadhouse at the end of the world. Why can I not vote for it here? I'm too close to it as the first song of the album, and it always sounds wrong to not hear the opening of The Gift after it ends. Still, this is really the greatest, needs no further explanation, and the mono 45 mix is featured here.
Speaking of Jerry Lee, he finally caved in to pressure from his record label and producer to move into the country market this year, proving himself a master of the form. Another Place Another Time was his first country smash, and should be sought out, as well as his third, She Still Comes Around (To Love What's Left Of Me). Heard on these polls is the most popular and everlsting of Jerry's country classics, the gorgeous What's Made Milwaukee Famous. The thing that kills me here is his voice, which may be his true instrument.
Louis Armstrong was winding up his long, miraculous recording career, his last session being the stunning We Have All The Time In The World the following year. But before then, he cut this tear-inducing classic, which may have been soppy crap from any other voice. Armstrong's utter charm makes this a stunner. This was a huge UK hit, but outrageously didn't even hit the Top 100 here, until its usage in the nauseating Good Morning VIetnam in the late 1980's. This really deserves votes.
What A Man also came nowhere near the pop chart, but has gained attention due to its megapopular update by Salt-n-Pepa/En Vogue. The original, raw-voiced Lyndell take is one of the sexiest soul records one can find, and a Stax all-time classic.
We're Rolling On is another in the streak of Curtis Mayfield and The Impressions' string of black-pride single classics. This is a sequel to the incredible We're A Winner, which may be a stronger tune and message, but the funkiness of this one is a fucking steamroller. The Impressions are the most underrated soul outfit, and Curtis Mayfield the most underrated poet, singer, producer, arranger, guitarist.
We'll Get Ahead Someday is one of Porter and Dolly's more cheerful ditties. Usually, there sang about one of their children dying a horrible death, but here, they have still got that American spirit and faith despite their everyday tribulations. Love it.
I still remember my first hearing of We Can Fly. My friend was making a bubblegum compilation cassette for me, and when he put this one out, it utterly stunned me with its punishing, unmerciful battery of hooks. When the "hey, YOU ON THE GROUND" and "HEY, EVERYONE ON THE GROUND, LET'S FLY!!!!" parts hit, I was a real goner. This one still lays me out. Perfect, shameless pop insanity.
Hilarious, though apt transition into Waiting Around To Die, which is about as low as they come. Thing is, Townes had as much in his voice as anyone on those Harry Smith Anthologies. Even if he didn't experience them himself, the full experiences of the hard-luck set travelled right into his soul and came out through his guitar and voice. This one is a perfect, concise example of a talent that could only cme from God or The Devil, perhaps both. Ya think this got much jukebox play?
Bringing this midblowing set to a close is the closer of Electric Ladyland, Voodoo Child (Slight Return). Not released as a 45 until 1970, in the UK as a memorial in the direct aftermath of Hendrix's passing, becoming a #1 hit under the incorrect title Voodoo Chile. But even in the States, this is a single by any other name. Perfect after the Townes cut, as this is also a deep, personal blues that could come from only one soul container. Yeah, it has suffered a bit due to overplay and overuse in too many movies, and it sounds better as the album closer, as Hendrix intended. But this is undeniable guitar terrorism.
It may sound crazy, but there is so much pure brilliance here that the only possible solution is to go with the one that had the most unexplainable emotional effect upon first listen.
So, for me, We Can Fly.

   
Becky
The Queen Of Soul

Posts: 2534
Registered: Aug 2008
 Posted June 17th, 2011 02:20 PM   IP              
Too much greatness. I'm going to need longer to think this over. BRB.
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 03:40 PM   IP              
why does the studio tomfoolery of We're Rolling On annoy me when the same on Voodoo Child knocks my socks off? Why should the precious twee of wonderboy make me want to take out a hit contract on rainbows when the same in We Can Fly gives me a warm feeling? Why does the Johnnie Taylor cut leave me cold when what A Man gives me a hard on? Who knows. I know that's a vile take of a vile song by Joe Cocker. It needs to be beat on with a belt.
Good Porter & Dolly. Great, GREAT Jerry Lee. I wish a couple of his other hit singles were gonna be here this year, Another PLace...make love sweeter... Waiting Around To die--thought I'd hate it but I didn't--at all.

Wichita vs. Voodoo, old personal favorite with brand new thang (yes, new to me). Voodoo--it's too badass.
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 03:41 PM   IP              
I'd also agree that W Lineman is definitely spooky. Always gave/gives me an eerie feeling.
   
Beckner
One Motherfucker

Posts: 19232
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 04:01 PM   IP              
Quote:
I know that's a vile take of a vile song by Joe Cocker.


You're wacked. It's great, better than the Beatles' own. Have you heard the whole album? Not even re-watching the entire "Wonder Years" series can diminish its power.
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 04:25 PM   IP              
Quote:
Nick wrote:
Waiting Around To die--thought I'd hate it but I didn't--at all.



Why'd you think you'd hate it?

Which version of that tune is on the poll, by the way, the heavily produced, spaghetti Western music-sounding single, or the stripped-down acoustic version? The latter is obviously the better one, but I actually kind of like the overproduced initial attempt in a weird sort of way. It's such a wrongheaded idea to do that to a song like that, with the choirs and war drums and shit, but the result is kind of weirdly affecting to me in a way. Such an odd experience. Generally with Townes, the less stuff you have getting in the way of his voice and the songs themselves, the better, though.


I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 04:26 PM   IP              
Can you put up the produced version?
   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 04:35 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
Can you put up the produced version?
Yeah, I'll have a bit of time when I get home tonight, I believe. It's pretty funny in retrospect, but I think Townes was initially horrified at what Jack Clements did to his first album. It's a testament to how disappointed he was in the final product that he ended up re-recording most of the really good songs on his debut in stripped-down versions over the course of his following two albums.


I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 04:39 PM   IP              
Quote:
Beckner wrote:


You're wacked. It's great, better than the Beatles' own. Have you heard the whole album? Not even re-watching the entire "Wonder Years" series can diminish its power.


I haven't but I'm not inclined to! It's not the Wonder Years thing, which is like an edit anyway, right? I just didn't like the song and I don't think this version saves it. Don't like the organ, the bass, the mix of backing vocals with the lead. The slow, serious heaviness of it. Just felt like trying to dress up a pig way hard and of course in the end...
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 04:42 PM   IP              
Quote:
halleluwah wrote:


Why'd you think you'd hate it?

Which version of that tune is on the poll, by the way, the heavily produced, spaghetti Western music-sounding single, or the stripped-down acoustic version? The latter is obviously the better one, but I actually kind of like the overproduced initial attempt in a weird sort of way. It's such a wrongheaded idea to do that to a song like that, with the choirs and war drums and shit, but the result is kind of weirdly affecting to me in a way. Such an odd experience. Generally with Townes, the less stuff you have getting in the way of his voice and the songs themselves, the better, though.




From what I vaguely knew (and I mean vaguely!) I guess I thought TVZ would just be this fake sounding guy, but I listened and was immediately convinced!

Obv you know this was the acoustic version, but if you up the mega one I'd give that a listen as well.
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 04:46 PM   IP              
If you are actually unfamiliar with Voodoo Child, I can see why that'd knock you right out here.
(Edited by IanWagner)

   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 04:54 PM   IP              
I really am--I try and be straightforward about that stuff. I know it's hard to believe. And it's doubly hard online because you can't see my face or body language or hear my voice even. I think I mentioned a while back that I had only just been getting into Hendrix (and not all of his stuff thrills me) and this is one tune that I hadn;t gotten to on my own yet. And if I had heard it on the radio when I was younger I had completely forgotten about it.

I know the holes in my listening experience can seem fake sometimes, but trying to make that stuff up wouldn't serve any real purpose...

...regardless--the boast: chopping mountains with his bare hands and then the actual doing it: on his guitar thrilled me.

   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 04:55 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
If you are actually unfamiliat with Voodoo Child, I can see why that'd knock you right out here.


Yeah, Voodoo Child is rough for me, because I've seen so damn many people in the SRV/Kenny Wayne Shepherd set using it as a springboard to just use for ten minutes of scrunchy-faced, one-chord blooze guitar wankery. It's an open-mic jam night staple, and the intro is the first lick you hear everybody play when they're first trying out a new wah pedal (I will admit to having been guilty of this myself). But sweet Jesus, when Jimi kicks on the fuzz and the band comes in, it's one of the most primal studio guitar assaults ever recorded. And that last verse...If I don't see you no more in this world, I'll meet you in the next one, and don't be late...that's pretty heavy. Hell of a last line to end an album on. But it's possibly more overfamiliar to me than almost any other song from this year; I've heard the damn thing thousands of times. The thought of having the opportunity to hear that again for the first time, without any prior knowledge of it, is scintillating, though. I wish I could have that opportunity again. That shit will knock you across the room on first listen.

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 05:04 PM   IP              
Maybe that's why I'm so impressed with Hendrix--with lots of others it seems like wankery, but with him I don't feel it is at all. even though it probably was as un-structured as anything, it's like me walking into a cathedral with all these flying buttresses, stained glass windows, gargoyles and shit at once. Intricate and light, yet solid and re-inforced. Structured spirit.

Also remember--I didn't play in a band, nor go to any open mic nights so wouldn't have heard it like that.
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 05:06 PM   IP              
Quote:
Nick wrote:
I really am--I try and be straightforward about that stuff. I know it's hard to believe. And it's doubly hard online because you can't see my face or body language or hear my voice even. I think I mentioned a while back that I had only just been getting into Hendrix (and not all of his stuff thrills me) and this is one tune that I hadn;t gotten to on my own yet. And if I had heard it on the radio when I was younger I had completely forgotten about it.

I know the holes in my listening experience can seem fake sometimes, but trying to make that stuff up wouldn't serve any real purpose...

...regardless--the boast: chopping mountains with his bare hands and then the actual doing it: on his guitar thrilled me.




Well, I think it is great and I envy your musical discoveries. For me, this was the type of stuff I never discovered, I just grew up hearing it every day. Sometimes I think about what it would be like to have sought this stuff out on my own. Through your experiences, I can kinda come close to that, vicariously, and hear the stuff from a new perspective.

   
Justin
Charles Nelson Reilly's SHORTS!

Posts: 854
Registered: Apr 2011
 Posted June 17th, 2011 05:15 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:


Well, I think it is great and I envy your musical discoveries. For me, this was the type of stuff I never discovered, I just grew up hearing it every day. Sometimes I think about what it would be like to have sought this stuff out on my own. Through your experiences, I can kinda come close to that, vicariously, and hear the stuff from a new perspective.


Right. It's like, it's hard to for me to believe-comprehend, really-that there are people my age who don't know the Beatles' last names, or any of their music. I grew up around so many different kinds of music that sometimes I have a hard time remembering that a lot of people didn't have that sort of upbringing. And it's not a knock on them, it's just that I always assumed that people grew up the same way-coming home from Kindergarten and eating your lunch while listening to Abbey Road.

Our Band could be Your Life.
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 05:16 PM   IP              
Thanks--I really appreciate that!

But enough meta. (about me, at least!) How about some more votes and comments!
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 05:19 PM   IP              
can't resist one more--didn't hear Abbey Road until I was 24-25 yrs old!
   
Matinee Idyll (129)
Camp Counsellor

Posts: 8244
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 06:40 PM   IP              
BJ Wilson is my favourite of ALL the British drummers at this time. To watch and listen to... mindblowing.
"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 07:32 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
Can you put up the produced version?

http://www.sendspace.com/file/a23wsk

This is the original, more overtly produced version of Waitin' 'Round To Die.

(Edited by halleluwah)

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
Matinee Idyll (129)
Camp Counsellor

Posts: 8244
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 07:50 PM   IP              
Yeah, that one hit hard.

I could go into indepth comments, I loved everything here - props to 'What a Man', 'What's Made Miwaukee Famous', and 'Waiting Around to Die' - the three I'd never heard before, all fabulous and contenders.

Every track had several 'ooh!' moments, but Jimi did come along at the end and literally trigger an apocalyptic whirlwind of sound and fury that wiped out the competition. I wasn't expecting it, but like 'Whole Lotta Love' in the '69 poll - you forget how towering these 'overplayed' numbers are.

Of the billion or so things one could love about 'Voodoo Child', this is my favourite:



The fact that the maracas are SO FREAKIN' LOUD, they practically swallow up the bass and drums - it's basically 5 minutes of Jimi jamming with his own overdubbed percussion.

"The Happy Maraca Plays the Hits of Jimi Hendrix"

"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
Matinee Idyll (129)
Camp Counsellor

Posts: 8244
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 08:11 PM   IP              
While I could never approach Jimi, I just spent the last 15 minutes jamming around on Voodoo Child - there are few more empowering experiences than laying into that feel and wahing your ass off.
"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
Jon
The Bubblegum Supremacist

Posts: 9214
Registered: Sep 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 09:18 PM   IP              
guess what I voted for!

Lynda Lyndell was second place. The record room has so changed my taste!!

I don't know why I ever believed the Chipmunks had the lowdown on punk.
   
Justin
Charles Nelson Reilly's SHORTS!

Posts: 854
Registered: Apr 2011
 Posted June 17th, 2011 09:30 PM   IP              
Surprised that there's no love for Cream, although I can see why-'White Room' isn't one of their best, although 'Wheels Of Fire' is a hell of an album.
Our Band could be Your Life.
   
Matinee Idyll (129)
Camp Counsellor

Posts: 8244
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 09:47 PM   IP              
No love for Cream!?

THEY'RE UNFREAKINBELIEVABLE! White Room is most certainly one of their best cuts.

"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
Jon
The Bubblegum Supremacist

Posts: 9214
Registered: Sep 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 10:04 PM   IP              
I adore Cream!! I just adore Jim Webb and Glen Campbell more.
I don't know why I ever believed the Chipmunks had the lowdown on punk.
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 10:59 PM   IP              
I think there's love from most for all of this stuff, but the competition is fierce.
   
Beckner
One Motherfucker

Posts: 19232
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 11:15 PM   IP              
I really don't understand the appeal of "Witchita Lineman."
   
artie
has Beach Boy blood in their veins

Posts: 1364
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 11:22 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
I think there's love from most for all of this stuff, but the competition is fierce.


Indeed.

Even though it has been overplayed and has become mainstream, in the end, I go with Louis' timeless, emotional vocal delivery of What A Wonderful World.
I really believe what he is singing; I'm listening again, trying to imagine it is my 4th or 5th time hearing it, or perhaps seeing him sing it live...and it is perfection.

Cowsills, Glen, and Jimi all hang close to it.

"This one...is this one"
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted June 17th, 2011 11:23 PM   IP              
It is a beautiful song, arrangement, performance. Amazing lyrics, stunning vocal. Haunting imagery. I don't understand how anyone couldn't be floored by it. The guitar break alone...whew.
   



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