.:The Record Room:.


.:Poll:.
Best Single Of 1968 #15
How Does It Feel To Feel - The Creation 33% [7/21]
Home Cookin' - Junior Walker & The All-Stars 0% [0/21]
Hole In My Pocket Ė The Rockets 0% [0/21]
Holding Onto Nothing Ė Porter Wagoner/Dolly Parton 5% [1/21]
Hold On Ė Sharon Tandy 10% [2/21]
Hip City (Part 2) - Junior Walker & The All-Stars 0% [0/21]
Hey Western Union Man - Jerry Butler 0% [0/21]
Hey Jude - The Beatles 38% [8/21]
Hey Jude Ė Wilson Pickett 0% [0/21]
Here I Am Baby - The Marvelettes 0% [0/21]
Here Comes The Judge - Shorty Long 5% [1/21]
Help Yourself - Tom Jones 5% [1/21]
Hello It's Me - Nazz 0% [0/21]
Hello I Love You - The Doors 5% [1/21]
Hello How Are You Ė The Easybeats 0% [0/21]


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.:1968 Singles Poll 15 PLEASE LISTEN, though you'll probably just vote for Hey Jude anyway:.
Author Message
MoogDroog
Michael Bolton's mullet

Posts: 8501
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 12th, 2011 05:30 PM   IP              
Choosing between The Creation and Sharon Tandy on this one is almost impossible. Both incredibly cool records but i think I have to give it to the dead-eyed, ceaseless How Does It Feel.
"The other thing is that the quality of the mp3's I listen to varies especially as some of the music from the likes of Led Zeppelin is old, even with re-mastering still isnt up to the quality of the likes of Def Leppard."
   
MoogDroog
Michael Bolton's mullet

Posts: 8501
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 12th, 2011 05:32 PM   IP              
Hey Jude has never been a song i've liked, really. I can't even get into the Pickett version til the last minute or so (and i've tried, loads).

The Shorty Long is amazing too. That's probably my favourite of the albums I discovered in Ian's Motown thread. It's a riot.

"The other thing is that the quality of the mp3's I listen to varies especially as some of the music from the likes of Led Zeppelin is old, even with re-mastering still isnt up to the quality of the likes of Def Leppard."
   
Matinee Idyll (129)
Camp Counsellor

Posts: 8244
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 13th, 2011 01:38 AM   IP              
I'm with you on the dilemma Moog... Creation or Sharon.

My heart says Sharon, but I don't want that dull as dishwater Fabs tune to come from behind and steal it from the rightful winners, The Creation.

Ahh fuck it, Sharon. But if it's a tie between Creation and Fabs, I change my vote.

"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
Matinee Idyll (129)
Camp Counsellor

Posts: 8244
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 13th, 2011 01:42 AM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote:
This poll has turned red...with purple flashes.


Ha! Nice one. What a fucking band.

"Nick is the Mode guy. Jon is the Duran guy."

   
halleluwah
Total Rock Cumshot

Posts: 7312
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 13th, 2011 03:54 PM   IP              
How Does It Feel To Feel - The Creation

Damn cool track. It pains me to learn that thereís a version out there missing the feedback, which sounds like such an integral part of that main riff that I canít imagine hearing the song without it. This fucker snarls angrily at you, assaults you, and makes you beg for another. And talking about whip-crack snare drum sounds, you could do a lot worse than this track. The first time I played the intro, I wasnít prepared for it, and every time I heard one of those snare hits, it made me involuntarily blink.



Home Cookin' - Junior Walker & The All-Stars

Love it. Iíd kill to be able to play bass like that. For somebody not really known as much of a singer, I think Junior did great for himself. His delivery was always spirited and perfect for the material. His stuff is the perfect get-off-your-ass-and-dance music. And I dug his other track here even more.



Hole In My Pocket Ė The Rockets

Itís striking how much they already sound like Crazy Horse here, even though those guys only accounted for three band members out of six. But this would sound right at home if you placed it in the middle of the Horseís í71 debut. Danny Whitten already sounds like some booze hound they picked up on the corner and stuck in front of a mike, and that is a good thing. The guy just oozed this funky, disheveled strain of plaid-shirted soul like few other white guys youíll ever hear. And the song is great, the type of thing that probably took about ten minutes to write, but whose perfect simplicity you could spend years trying to duplicate yourself. And the fiddle is killer. That Bobby Notkoff was something; same guy who helped make Neilís ďRunning DryĒ so haunting the following year.



Holding Onto Nothing Ė Porter Wagoner/Dolly Parton

Itís a very good duet record, with the two of them both in fine, dignified form, taking a clear-eyed view of why their love is going to hell. Itís very slick and miles away from the honkytonk as a production, but the two of them work marvelously well towards a common emotional goal, and it comes off as effortlessly affecting.



Hold On Ė Sharon Tandy

Within the first twenty seconds, I knew this would probably be what Iíd end up voting for. Even having read the previous raves about this track in this thread, itís still startling to hear how insanely aggressive this sounds. It sounds like the guitar is revolting, attacking its master to death during that solo. But over the rabid din, she maintains this laid-back cool to her vocal approach, like some sexy Medusa teasing you to come closer while her snakes are snapping at you at the same time. What a gloriously demented record this is.



Hip City (Part 2) - Junior Walker & The All-Stars

So funky it hurts. Thereís really no Ďsongwritingí here to speak of; itís basically just a one-chord vamp cut from the middle of a jam, over which Junior shouts some stuff about dancing and calls out some cities. Itís artless. But that groove is so IMPOSSIBLY funky; who needs an actual song at a time like this? Anybody worried about this record lacking hooks or whatever just isnít dancing hard enough.



Hey Western Union Man - Jerry Butler


It pains me that you canít write songs like this anymore. A song about desperately trying to log into your IM account to tell your woman you love her just doesnít have the same weight, you know. Hell, maybe Jerry Butler could still sell that concept, though. Heís so damn good at never overplaying his hand as a singer. You know how you see some great actors who delight in chewing scenery, drawing attention to themselves at every turn, and you can never take your eyes off them, while others just toil thanklessly in the shadows because their performances are so understated and naturalistic, but they can feel a bit more Ďrealí at times? That is kind of like the relationship between Jerry Butler and most other soul singers. Heís a fantastic singer, but he never calls attention to that fact. The songís great too, driven by that double-time drum beat that still feels laid back, and a chorus that goes for the high stakes in terms of beauty and power.



Hey Jude - The Beatles
Hey Jude Ė Wilson Pickett


I decided that I still do like this song. I mean, yes, it is overblown far in excess of the level of modesty it deserves, and some of its lyrics donít quite make it. The Wilson Pickett version is about at the right length for the song, I think. It still feels more than epic enough without having to drive the point in to your head repeatedly for four additional minutes. But the thing is, I have to admit that itís clearly the work of a master melodist. I canít imagine having a gift like that, where you can just spin off melodies that are original, but immediately sound like theyíve been around forever the first time you hear them. What makes it work so well is the contrast between the simple, almost child piano lesson-esque verse melody, which hooks you in and gets your guard down, and the more sophisticated and moving bridge. Neither of those sections would work as well without the other one there, alternately adding and taking away weight. And listening again, Iíll give you that Ringoís snare sound is indeed too dull and thuddy, but I maintain that the rest of the kit sounds great. Wilson Pickettís reinvention of the song as a soul anthem, given a lightly funky arrangement, was a bit of a masterstroke. He pulls out emotional peaks from the song that Paul couldnít approach, both toughening and tenderizing the message. And adding Duane Allman (even though itís a very young Duane who didnít quite have his tone or chops together as much yet as he soon would) to the mix does not make it a fair fight. The Beatlesí cleanliness just cannot compete with that level of soul all gathered in one place. But take away all elements of cultural baggage, production, performance, etc. and just listen to it as a composition? Itís clearly a fantastic melody, and Paul deserves some props for that.



Here I Am Baby - The Marvelettes

More sexily funky sweetness from Motown. You canít beat that company for consistency, but that also means itís hard to write anything original and non-repetitive about a lot of their records.



Here Comes The Judge - Shorty Long

On the other hand, this is a pretty unique Motown record, and itís a blast. This is at Rufus Thomas-level in terms of funky soul humor songs, and thatís a serious compliment. Even if you donít get off on the humor (and there is some funny stuff in hereÖĒJudge, this boy cannot dance!Ē), you canít hear a song this energetically funky and not have a smile on your face.



Help Yourself - Tom Jones

Iíll admit that I cannot hear this without immediately thinking about the sex scene from Anchorman. Like a lot of Tom Jonesí stuff, this has a thick layer of smarmy lounge cheese melted over the top, but at the same time, I canít help but like it. He always seems good-humored and self-aware about the cartoonishness of his oily God of Chest Hair image, and moreover, regardless of anything else you could say about the guy, youíve got to admit that he can flat-out SING.



Hello It's Me Ė Nazz

Honestly, I think I like this original better than Toddís solo hit version (which is great, of course, but weíre talking in degrees here). Thereís something weirdly tranquil about this reading that makes it unique. The vibes, the melodic, bend-y basslines, the distinctive way Stewkey approaches the vocal. I can see why this wasnít much of a hit at the time, though; it sounds a little subtle to stick out much on the radio, and the hooks are a little muted in deference to the overall atmosphere.



Hello I Love You - The Doors

Iíve never liked this song, and I still donít. The thick distortion on some of the keyboard and guitar sounds is pretty killer, though.



Hello How Are You Ė The Easybeats

Not my favorite of the Easybeats stuff Iíve heard so far, but itís a creditable ballad. Thereís a reason that kind of descending-chord piano ballad has become such a clichť these days; thereís something inherently moving about it. And they do it well here, just not quite as well as, say, the Bee Gees.



(Edited by halleluwah)

I'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMINGI'MCOMING
   
IanWagner
The Rustic Bumfiddler

Posts: 47999
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 13th, 2011 07:29 PM   IP              
That Sharon Tandy is insane, ain't it? Love your writing on the Butler, and all else.
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 20th, 2011 04:41 PM   IP              
Huh. The day I reach for Hey Jude over Here Comes The Judge you can stick a fork in me cause I am done. That song is the BEST.

Also liked Creation, JR, Rockets (never even heard of them), Sharon Tandy (she almost got my vote--where the hell has she been? smh), Beatles, wilson Pickett (now I know where Cool V/Paul C got the sample for the Biz's Dedication from!), Marvelettes (this, too, almost got my vote), the Doors (the most obnoxious noise on this poll) and the Easybeats.
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 20th, 2011 04:42 PM   IP              
Joe, tell me more about ms Tandy.
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 20th, 2011 04:47 PM   IP              
Quote:
IanWagner wrote: Shorty Long (in Marvin Gaye's estimation, the most talented artist at the company).


High five to Marvin!
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 20th, 2011 04:47 PM   IP              
Quote:
kenny wrote:
THIS has a bad snare sound.




I love that song!
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 20th, 2011 04:49 PM   IP              
Quote:
Jon wrote:
(I really like Aztec Camera!)


High five to Jon!
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 20th, 2011 04:54 PM   IP              
Quote:
Matinee Idyll (129) wrote:
Hold On... Oh Sharon! What a stunning, freaked out, insanely cool and sexy burst of psychedelic energy. Her vocal is part Dusty, part Sandie Shaw and all perfect - how could you resist holding on!?! Les Fleur De Lys were the backing band, who released a cover of The Who's 'Circles' and some other fine singles. Nothing else they, or indeed Sharon did stacks up against this titan of titillation. Perhaps even including Hendrix (don't quote me on that though) this track may have my favourite guitar-strangling of the year. Unbelievable.

It started life as a B-side, but was re-released as the A because it's so damn undeniably awesome.



Not sure what I'll vote for yet (I'll sleep on it), but not sure you can top this.
(Edited by Matinee Idyll (129))


Very cool--thx Joe. I see you ava too!
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 20th, 2011 05:11 PM   IP              
Quote:
halleluwah wrote:

Hey Western Union Man - Jerry Butler


It pains me that you canít write songs like this anymore. A song about desperately trying to log into your IM account to tell your woman you love her just doesnít have the same weight, you know. Hell, maybe Jerry Butler could still sell that concept, though. Heís so damn good at never overplaying his hand as a singer. You know how you see some great actors who delight in chewing scenery, drawing attention to themselves at every turn, and you can never take your eyes off them, while others just toil thanklessly in the shadows because their performances are so understated and naturalistic, but they can feel a bit more Ďrealí at times? That is kind of like the relationship between Jerry Butler and most other soul singers. Heís a fantastic singer, but he never calls attention to that fact. The songís great too, driven by that double-time drum beat that still feels laid back, and a chorus that goes for the high stakes in terms of beauty and power.




R Kelly feels the same way! Although, towards the end he gets so excited he take a text if he's gotta!

   
kenny
Charles Nelson Reilly's SHORTS!

Posts: 986
Registered: Feb 2008
 Posted July 20th, 2011 05:18 PM   IP              
Quote:
Nick wrote:


I love that song!


I like the song but can barely listen to it these days since I heard it early one morning on the radio and the "snare" (for want of better word) really stood out. It's a crime.
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 20th, 2011 05:26 PM   IP              
NP--and I think most people would agree with you--I find a lot of disgust at that album called Love.
   
Nick
Has Taken The Cure

Posts: 9478
Registered: Aug 2007
 Posted July 20th, 2011 07:11 PM   IP              
Also another nice contemp. song going with the Western Union theme


   



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